Blancpain Equation du Temps Marchante – The World’s First Running Equation of Time Watch (2004)

The running equation of time (“Equation du Temps Marchante”) watch by Blancpain was debuted in 2004. This limited edition of 50 pieces features two equation of time displays, the running solar minutes-hand (bearing a sun) and a plus/minus display at 2 o’clock. An equation of time display ties the watch to the cycles of the sun, complete with a hand-carved rotor depicting the sun (in gold), moon and stars.

Blancpain Equation du Temps Marchante - The World's First  Running Equation of Time Watch (2004)

In the history of fine watchmaking, perhaps the most mystical and precious complication of all has been the equation of time. An equation of time display ties the watch to the cycle of the sun. For convenience, humans have defined the day to be exactly 24 hours in length.

Faithful to that definition, watches from the most humble inexpensive quartz watch to the most prized mechanical marvel measure time according to that defined standard. In reality, however, the defined 24-hour day is a convenience, an average, that serves most purposes well but does not correspond exactly to the actual length of a solar day. Because the earth’s orbit is not exactly round and because the earth’s axis of rotation is inclined by 23 degrees, the actual solar day may be several minutes longer or shorter, depending on the time of year, than 24 hours.

The difference between the length of the actual solar day, termed “solar time”, and the 24-hour day, termed “civil time”, is called the equation of time. The accumulated differences between civil time and solar time can be as much as +14 minutes and –16 minutes; on four days per year the errors catch up and the solar time and civil time correspond exactly.

Two centuries ago, fascination with the sun and this phenomenon of a day which varies in length inspired watch and clockmakers to record this time difference, the equation of time, on the face of a timepiece. Since then the equation complication has been reserved for only the most important watches and clocks. In the early development of equation of time movements, two methods of recording the time difference were conceived. The more simple of the two is a display of the difference between solar and civil time on a plus/minus scale. Far more complicated was the second, an équation marchante movement.

With the équation marchante or “running equation” movement, a second minutes-hand is added indicating solar time. This offers the advantage that the solar time can be directly read from the face of the watch. The difference can also be discerned from the difference between the solar minutes hand and the conventional civil minutes-hand. Equation of time displays in wristwatches have always been extraordinarily rare and, following the tradition developed over two centuries with pocket watches and clocks, they have been incorporated in only the most refined of timepieces. However, working in the small dimensions of a wristwatch, the equation complication has, until now, only been of the more simplified plus/minus scale variety.

In 2004, Blancpain debuted a revolutionary equation of time watch, the Equation du Temps Marchante. Blancpain’s watchmakers undertook to bring to wristwatches, for the first time, the rare and difficult running equation complication that had existed only in large clocks and pocket watches. To do this they had to design an innovative gear train, with an ingenious differential that combines the running of the equation gear train controlled by a complex-shaped cam and the running train of the watch’s civil minutes-hand, to drive the running equation hand. In addition, Calibre 3863 provides a plus/minus scale equation display.

Blancpain Equation du Temps Marchante - The World's First  Running Equation of Time Watch (2004)

There is extraordinary complexity in the calendar mechanism of Calibre 3863, which must combine a perpetual calendar with the equation of time train and the normal minute train of the watch. A patented differential system was specially developed for the watch. Of particular interest, at 6 o’clock, is the ellipsoidal wheel which calculates the length of the solar day according to month.

Blancpain Equation du Temps Marchante - The World's First  Running Equation of Time Watch (2004)

As befits this extraordinary wristwatch, Blancpain combined these two separate equation displays with an innovative retrograde moon phase indication and a complete perpetual calendar. The decoration of the movement celebrates this achievement with a special hand carving of the bridges and a meticulously hand-fashioned winding rotor bearing an artist’s image of the sun.

Gübelin “Turbulences” Tourbillon Pocket Watch by Richard Daners and Marion Müller

Gübelin “Turbulences” is a Tourbillon pocket watch conceived and made by the master watchmakers Richard Daners and Marion Müller in 2004 , to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Lucerne-based Jewellery and watch business group Gübelin (1854-2004).

It has a construction that even amongst watchmakers has been deemed impossible: a tourbillon that rotates around three axles in a rectangular position to each other.Gübelin “Turbulences” Tourbillon Pocket Watch by Richard Daners and Marion Müller
The tourbillon, invented by Abraham Louis Breguet in 1795, even today represents one of the greatest challenges any traditional master watchmaker can think of. The watchmaker of Swiss origin, probably the most famous of his kind, had devised the construction in his Paris workshops in order to gain the utmost in precision from his pocket watches.

The constant influence of the earth’s gravity resulted in a lack of precision of the watches that were usually worn in a vertical position in vests and jackets. This default is due to the fact that it is virtually impossible to counterbalance the balance wheel and its hairspring. Breguet’s tourbillon put an end to this problem by guaranteeing that balance wheel, hairspring and escapement fulfil one rotation around their common axis, thereby neutralizing all inherent balance errors.

This rule still applies today, however only if the watch is always worn in a vertical position. Richard Daners and Marion Müller have built a tourbillon that eliminates the so-called gravitational error, no matter in which position the watch is worn. By creating this masterpiece the Gübelin ateliers demonstrated their willingness to venture upon the challenge of the impossible.

The difficulty of developing a tourbillon on three axes only becomes obvious if one realizes how tiny the forces are at the end of the gear train of a mechanical movement. The escape wheel that transmits its impulse to the balance wheel via the pallets has just enough strength to move the tip of an eider down.

Gübelin “Turbulences” Tourbillon Pocket WatchThe movement of the golden pocket watch is symmetrical in its construction and is driven by two spring barrels under one common bridge. The gears are mostly hidden in order not to draw the attention from the three-dimensional tourbillon. Like a skeletized globe it is suspended freely above an opening in the base plate.

Viewing the dial of the watch the delicate tourbillon can be seen through this circular hole. It is only from the rear that one discerns the whole glory of the mechanism. A large transparent caseback made of mineral glass allows a breathtaking view of the tourbillon’s complexity.
Gübelin “Turbulences” Tourbillon Pocket Watch by Richard Daners and Marion MüllerThe see-through cage is driven via an invisible circular cogwheel sustained by a large precision ball bearing, arranged around the opening in the base plate. The lightweight cage turns around the first axis, perpendicular to the plate once in 135 seconds. It takes it 45 seconds to turn in its second axis.

The escapement finally, situated in the innermost cage, accomplishes one full turn in a minute. Its axis again is always at a right angle to the second axis. Thus the observer sees an ever-changing image in continuous motion. The differences in running time of the three cages have the effect that it takes nine minutes until they all come back to their initial position for just one short moment.

The main cage of the tourbillon is suspended on one side only, which results in a so-called flying tourbillon. Therefore the axis on which it turns is invisible. By this the construction obtains a mysterious weightlessness. While trying to follow the complex movements of the tourbillon the observer will become aware of how his or her eyes try to dive into the gears to comprehend what can be seen. This is no easy task, seeing that we are used to gear trains with parallel axles, but none in which their position continually changes.

To round off the complexity of their masterpiece the two Gübelin watchmakers have equipped their escapement with a device that furnishes it with a constant amount of energy independent from the force stored in the spring barrels.

The contrivance relies on the principle of inertia and is a solution that is equally ingenious as simple, based on a 1943 invention by Henry Jeanneret. It ensures that the escape wheel at the moment of release does not get its force directly from the spring barrels, but indirectly from a spiralled hairspring that acts similarly as a buffer in computer technology.

It is regularly armed via the gear train as soon as the escape wheel is stopped again. If it were not for the hairspring, the escape wheel would rotate freely on its pinion. The pinion bears a small platinum weight whose inertia guarantees that the entire gear train only starts moving with a certain delay after the release of the escape wheel.

At the moment of its release the escape wheel, armed by the spiral spring, immediately hurries off, only being followed by its pinion when it has already stopped again.

Gübelin Patek Philippe Jubilee Watch – Calatrava Travel Time Limited Edition (Ref. 5134)

Gübelin-Patek Philippe jubilee watch- Calatrava Travel Time is a special edition timepiece created in 2004 on the occasion of 150th anniversary of Swiss jewellery and watch house Gübelin.

Legendary Swiss watch maker Patek Philippe has joined hands with Gübelin to produce this edition of the popular dual time zone watch, Calatrava Travel Time, in a limited series.

Travel Time unites the classic form of the Calatrava line with the complication of a movement that simultaneously indicates the time in two different time zones. It is the ideal watch for professional globetrotters, as it is strikingly simple to operate.

People who frequently travel long distances by air know how difficult it can be to keep track of the time at home as well as the local time. Two easily distinguishable hour hands display the time in each of the time zones and a small 24-hour subsidiary dial provides day/night information for your home time. The local time can be set easily by pressing the two buttons in the caseband, which move the corresponding hand forward or backward depending on the direction one is traveling across the globe.

Gübelin Patek Philippe Jubilee Watch - Calatrava Travel Time Limited Edition (Ref. 5134)

The Calatrava Travel Time features the manually wound caliber 215 PS FUS, and like all Patek Philippe creations, it is decorated by hand with painstaking care and bears the prestigious Geneva Seal. The elegant watchcase of Calatrava Travel Time is water resistant. The jubilee watch collection was produced in four different variations in a limited series of 180.

Gübelin and Patek Philippe names are engraved on the specially designed dial, which comes in the colors brown, blue, silver and black. Other distinguishing features include the straight-sided bâton hour hands and massive-design indices. The transparent sapphire crystal caseback bears the Gübelin emblem and is dedicated “Gübelin 1854 – 2004”.

50 pieces were produced in yellow gold with a brown dial, 45 in white gold with a blue dial, 45 in rose gold with a silver-colored dial and 40 in platinum with a black dial.

Technical details

Model: Gübelin-Patek Philippe jubilee watch Calatrava Travel Time – Ref. 5134

Movement
Caliber 215 PS FUS 24H
Mechanical movement, manually wound
Overall diameter: 21.90 mm
Height: 3.35 mm
Number of parts: 178
Number of jewels: 18
Power reserve: Approx. 44 hours
Balance: Gyromax
Frequency: 28,800 semi-oscillations/hour
Balance spring: Flat
Hallmark: Geneva Seal

Indications
Dual hour display for local and home time, minutes, seconds
Subsidiary dials: 24-hour display (home time) at 12 o’clock and seconds at 6 o’clock

Case
18K yellow, rose or white gold or platinum
Sapphire crystal caseback secured with screws
2 buttons in the caseband for operating the time zone mechanism
Case extension ridges for protecting the crown
Dimensions:Diameter :37 mm ; Height: 9.8 mm
Water resistance:To 25 meters

Dial
Silver, brown, blue or black with applied indices in gold to match the case
Bâton hand in gold for the display of hours in local time, the small seconds display and the 24-hour day/night information for home time
Bâton hand in matte yellow, rose or white gold for the display of hours in home time

Strap
Handmade alligator band, Folding clasp in 18K yellow, rose or white gold or platinum with Calatrava cross

Suggested prices during launch in 2004
Yellow gold : CHF 20,100
Rose and white gold: CHF 21,400
Platinum: CHF 34,000

A. Lange & Söhne Lange Double Split – World’s First Flyback Chronograph with Double Rattrapante

Introduced in 2004, the LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT chronograph watch from A. Lange & Söhne features two rattrapante hands – one for the seconds and one for the minutes to be stopped. What’s more, both chrono hands and both rattrapante hands are flyback hands.

The intricate complication of a rattrapante sweep-seconds hand in a chronograph has always been an awesome horological accomplishment for short-time measurements. Unfortunately, the possibility of taking a lap-time reading with the rattrapante sweep-seconds hand during an ongoing measurement was restricted to the 60-second scale and thus to laps of less than one minute.

In the LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT, the principle of the rattrapante sweep-seconds hand has been extended to the jumping minute counter. This means that for the first time ever, comparative lap measurements of up to 30 minutes  are now possible in a classic, purely mechanical wristwatch. Also, the act of measuring a lap time does not have to be at the expense of a loss of amplitude when the chrono sweep-seconds hand continues to revolve while the rattrapante sweep-seconds hand is stopped. This is prevented by a patented disengagement mechanism developed by “A. Lange & Söhne”.

The LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT was inspired by the technical refinements once before integrated in a Lange double-rattrapante pocket watch that dates back to the late 19th century.

Buoyed by the success story of the DATOGRAPH that began in 1999, the engineers systematically evolved an already ingenious timekeeping instrument to create an incomparable horological masterpiece in a platinum case with a diameter of 43 millimetres. They endowed this landmark timepiece with all of the major innovations and complications that since then have been devised at the Lange manufactory in Glashütte.

This includes a new balance wheel developed in-house by Lange. Designed for a frequency of 21,600 semi-oscillations per hour, it is equipped with eccentric poising weights instead of inertia screws. It is powered by a top-quality balance spring which was also developed in-house by Lange and is manufactured on site. It, too, features a technical novelty: It is not attached to a hairspring stud but instead is secured by a patented balance-spring clamp.
Inaugurated in 2003, the manufactory’s new Technology and Development Centre has been pursuing the kind of fundamental research that Richard Lange, the oldest son of company founder Ferdinand Adolph Lange, embarked upon in 1930 with his patent No. 529945 concerning a “metal alloy for balance springs”, an invention that since then has found global acceptance. He discovered that the sensitivity of hairsprings to temperature fluctuations could be reduced and their flexibility enhanced with the addition of beryllium.  Since establishment, Lange is one of only a few companies in the world that master the latest-generation processes needed to manufacture balance springs. All these assets are embodied in the LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT, a very special and exclusive horological accomplishment.


With its manually wound calibre L001.1 movement, the LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT is first and foremost a watch that indicates the hours and minutes on its two-tiered black solid-silver dial, the seconds on its silvery subsidiary dial on the left-hand side, and the power reserve with an indicator beneath the Roman “XII”. The small seconds dial, the also silvery 30-minute counter dial of the chronograph on the right-hand side and the up and down indicator constitute the corners of an equilateral triangle, a typical characteristic of the architecture of Lange dials.

The chronograph function: When the owner presses the start/stop push piece of the chronograph, subtly rounded to accent the classic circular case, the LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT becomes a “watch in the watch”. This action sets the slender gold-plated chrono sweep-seconds hand in motion. When the same push piece is pressed again, the hand stops. When the zero-reset push piece at 4 o’clock is pressed, the sweep-seconds hand returns to the 12 o’clock position.The chrono minute counter: Each time the chrono sweep-seconds hand crosses the 12 o’clock marker – not before and not afterwards – the gold chrono minute counter advances by one minute marker. Thus, in the “grey zone” on either side of the zero passage of the sweep-seconds hand, there is never any uncertainty as to the accuracy of a measurement.

The flyback function: While the chronograph mechanism is running, both chronograph hands can be instantly reset to zero by pressing the push piece at 4 o’clock. When this push piece is released, the chrono sweep-seconds hand restarts immediately. Its minute counter will advance by one marker precisely one minute later. This so-called flyback device makes it possible to initiate a new measurement without delay. With simple chronographs, the same effect requires the actuation of the start/stop push piece to stop the hands the actuation of the zero-reset push piece to return the hands to the home position, and the renewed actuation of the start/stop push piece to start the next measurement. The flyback mechanism bundles all of these interventions into one actuation. The idea for this mechanism dates back to an epoch in which pilots needed to co-ordinate speed, rudder position, and time to fly curves, and fast reactions were needed.

The rattrapante function: A further hand is located above the chrono sweep-seconds hand and over the chrono minute-counter hand. The rattrapante sweep-seconds hand, made of rhodiumed steel, hovers over the chrono sweep-seconds hand and the blued steel rattrapante minute-counter hand lies a hair’s breadth above the chrono minute counter hand. During an ongoing time measurement, the rattrapante hands can be used for a separate lap time measurement at any given moment. This is how it works: When the start/stop push piece at 2 o’clock is pressed, both pairs of hands are set in motion simultaneously. The rattrapante push piece at 10 o’clock is pressed to measure the first time. The rattrapante sweep seconds hand stops instantly, displaying the measured lap time. For the second measurement, the start/stop push piece is pressed to stop the still-running chrono sweep-seconds hand. This allows the owner to note the second lap time as a separate result or to compare it with the first lap time. If more than two consecutive measurements are to be made after the hands have been collectively set in motion, the following procedure must be observed: The first lap time, stopped with the rattrapante push piece, must be memorised or written down. The renewed actuation of the push piece causes the rattrapante sweep-seconds hand to instantaneously catch up with the still-running chrono sweep-seconds hand. This process can be repeated as often as desired, as long as the chrono sweep-seconds hand is in motion and the aggregate time measurement has thus not been interrupted.

The rattrapante minute counter: The LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT has a chrono minute counter as well as a rattrapante minute counter. For this reason, the rattrapante time measuring range is not just 60 seconds as in conventional chronographs, but 30 minutes. Technically, this was achieved by duplicating the construction of the chrono/rattrapante wheel pair. In other words, the minute-counter wheel has a through bore that accommodates the shaft of the second rattrapante wheel. Since the LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT contains a chronograph mechanism with a precisely jumping minute counter, the rattrapante minute counter jumps as well. A lever mechanism developed by Lange especially for this purpose assures that it advances by only one minute at a time, at precisely the right moment.

Reference lap time measurement: If a lap time measured with the rattrapante hands is required as a reference time for further measurements, it can simply be “stored”. This is done by leaving the stopped rattrapante time untouched and by resetting the chrono sweep-seconds hand with the start/stop push piece followed by the zero-reset push piece – or instantaneously with the zero-reset push piece (flyback). The normal chronograph function can now be used to measure a reference lap time and compare it with the time displayed by the rattrapante hands. This process, too, can be repeated for any number of further reference lap times that might be needed.

Fastest/slowest lap measurement: Technology buffs will appreciate another function that allows the identification of minima and maxima – the fastest or slowest lap of all laps measured, for instance. To determine the fastest lap of a series, the first lap is stopped with the pair of rattrapante hands, the second with the pair of chronograph hands. At this point, both times need to be compared. If the lap time displayed by the chronograph hands is the shorter of the two, this value must be stored as the minimum, simply by pressing the rattrapante push piece twice in a row. The first actuation causes the rattrapante hands to line up with the chronograph hands, the second actuation freezes them there. If the lap time indicated by the rattrapante hands is shorter, no action is required. The hands can stay where they are.

The next lap can be timed – and if applicable, stored – by resetting, restarting, and restopping the chronograph hands. Conversely, to determine the slowest lap, the rattrapante push piece must be pressed twice if the time measured by the chronograph hands is greater. In both cases, the value displayed by the rattrapante hands at the end of a series of measurements is the extreme (maximum or minimum) of all stopped times.

The disengagement mechanism mentioned above, a Lange proprietary development, prevents the so far technically unavoidable amplitude drop in conventional constructions when the chronograph hands are running but the rattrapante hands are stopped. Normally, the sustained contact between the still-running heart-shaped rattrapante cams and the rattrapante heart levers creates friction losses and torque fluctuations. In the LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT, these annoying phenomena have been eliminated because disengagement wheels on the rattrapante centre wheel and on the rattrapante minute wheel separate both rattrapante heart levers from the still rotating heart-shaped cams. This has a beneficial influence on the rate accuracy of the movement. This makes the habitual use of the fascinating and very practical rattrapante function a delight that entails no regret, all the more as most of the complex mechanisms of this mechanical marvel can be admired through the sapphire crystal caseback. It is hardly disputable that the LANGE DOUBLE SPLIT will push the emotions of connoisseurs around the world quite far up on the open-ended enthusiasm scale.

Technical details

Movement
Lange manufacture calibre L001.1, manually wound;crafted, assembled, and decorated almost entirely by hand to the highest Lange quality standards; precision adjusted in five positions; plates and bridges made of untreated cross-laminated German silver; balance cock engraved by hand;Number of parts: 465;Jewels: 40;Screwed gold chatons: 4;Escapement: Lever escapement;Balance: New, shock-proofed Glucydur balance with eccentric poising weights; proprietary top-quality balance spring with an attachment (balance spring clamp) for which a patent registration has been filed; frequency 21,600 semi-oscillations per hour; precision beat adjuster with whiplash spring;Power reserve: 38 hours when fully wound.

Functions
World’s first flyback chronograph with double rattrapante, controlled by classic column wheels; precisely jumping chrono minute counter and rattrapante minute counter; flyback function; disengagement mechanism; hours, minutes, small seconds with stop seconds; power-reserve indicator; cumulative and lap-time measurements between 1/6th of a second and 30 minutes, tachometer scale

Operating elements
Crown for winding the watch and setting the time; two push pieces for operating the chronograph; one push piece for operating the rattrapante.

Case, dial & strap
Case: Diameter 43 mm, platinum
Glass and caseback: Sapphire crystal (hardness 9)
Dials: Solid silver, two-tiered, black
Hands: Yellow gold, rhodiumed gold, blued steel and rhodiumed steel
Straps: Hand-stitched crocodile straps with solid-platinum Lange prong buckle

Carl F. Bucherer Patravi Tonneaugraph

Equipped with Automatic CFB 1960 movement, this timepiece from Carl F. Bucherer combines three useful complications – chronograph, big date and power reserve – all in an elegant steel case in tonneau style. Its black dial features appliqué diamond hour luminous markers and luminescent hands.

A window at 12’o clock displays the date, and the power reserve indicator is positioned at 6’o clock. Fitted with cambered sapphire crystal, screw-down case back & screw-down crown, the Patravi Tonneaugraph offers water-resistance up to 50 meters.

Carl F. Bucherer Patravi Tonneaugraph

Technical details

Movement
Automatic CFB 1960
Circular-grained and Côtes de Genève decoration

Functions
Hours, minutes, seconds, date, chronograph, power reserve

Case
Steel
Cambered sapphire crystal, screw-down back
Screw-down crown
Water-resistant to 50 m

Dial
Black, appliqué diamond hour markers
Luminescent hands and hour markers

Strap
Black alligator, folding clasp

Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore Juan Pablo Montoya, Pink Gold, Limited Edition

This ROYAL OAK OFFSHORE timepiece from AUDEMARS PIGUET is named after one of the most successful and famous Colombian racing drivers, Juan Pablo Montoya. Launched in 2004, in collaboration with world renowned watchmaker Richard Mille, this limited edition timepiece draws its inspiration from aesthetics and technical features of racing cars.

Case of this exceptional rose gold Royal Oak Offshore (Ref. 26030RO.OO.D001IN.01) timepiece is highlighted with stunning combination of rose gold and carbon. Inspired from the technical features of racing cars, the screws of raised octagonal bezel in rose gold with carbon inserts look like cylinder head screws; the crown is reminiscent of a wheel axle, and the push-buttons resemble cooling flaps.

The Royal Oak Offshore Juan Pablo Montoya is equipped with a 54 jewels Cal.2226/2840 automatic nickel lever movement with an openwork oscillating weight in the form of a brake disc, which is visible through the sapphire case back.

Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore Juan Pablo Montoya, Pink Gold, Limited Edition

The stunning black dial adorned with clous de Paris decoration features luminescent indexes in pink gold and luminous pink gold baton hands, outer ring for tachymeter, three sub dials: small seconds at 12’o clock, 30-minute and 12-hour chronograph counters (9’o clock & 6’o clock respectively), and a date window at 3’o clock.

The screw down case back is secured with eight hexagonal screws and has inscription ‘ROYAL OAK OFFSHORE JUAN PABLO MONTOYA LIMITED EDITION’. The Pink gold version of the Royal Oak Offshore Juan Pablo Montoya is worn with a leather strap featuring an Audemars Piguet 18 carat pink gold deployant clasp.

The limited edition Royal Oak Offshore Juan Pablo Montoya is available in Titanium (1000 pieces), Rose gold (500 pieces) and Platinum (100 pieces) versions.

Anderesen Geneve 1884 World Time Watch (2004)

Introduced in 2004, the 1884 World Time Watch is an exceptional edition of 120 watches, equipped with an ingenious universal-time mechanism as a special tribute to Sir Stanford Fleming, who was the driving force behind the introduction of a world time system.

This exceptional edition commemorates the 120th anniversary of the “Prime Meridian Conference”, which accepted the system of 24 time zones invented by Sir Sandford Fleming.

Anderesen Geneve 1884 World Time Watch (2004)

In 1876 Sanford Fleming was sitting on a railway station bench in the little Irish town of Bandoran.  He had missed his train. Instead of leaving at 5.30 in the evening as the timetable showed, his train had in fact left at 5.30 in the morning. Now he had to wait for 12 hours.

This misfortune gave Sanford Fleming occasion to think hard. In the 19th century – as is still the case in America today – daytime was counted in two periods of 12 hours instead of using a 24 hour clock. What is more, each country in Europe and each major locality in America had its own time, its own zero meridian and its own observatory.

In 1850 there were 144 time zones between the East and West coast of America which all depended on the position of the sun at noon, i.e. on the solar noon. In Europe, work on the standardisation of time had already begun. In 1848 there was already just one time throughout England which was determined at the Greenwich Observatory where the zero meridian was also fixed. The zero meridian for Switzerland ran through Berne.

The time problems resulting from the advance of industrialisation became increasingly acute. The consequences of the impossibility of determining deadlines, the imprecise introduction of new laws or the inaccurate dating of messages were not the worst. The situation for shipping and the railways was more hazardous. Ships sailing under all kinds of different flags determined their positions according to their national maps. In effect this meant that ships sailing under different flags could not give a warning of dangers.

Finally the railway lines were used by different rail companies. The badly coordinated schedules resulted in many rail accidents. Every train travelled at the time applicable at the place where the rail company had its headquarters. If a traveller had to take trains operated by several companies it was almost impossible for him to determine a precise timetable.

Sanford Fleming did not want to miss his train again. So he suggested that the world should be divided into 24 meridians, i.e. 1 meridian for every 15 degrees of longitude separated by time zones. Greenwich meridian was to be taken as the global zero. The date change was to occur on one of the meridians and the hours of the day were to be counted from 1 to 24.

In October 1884 Fleming managed to arrange for the “Prime Meridian Conference” to be convened in Washington. After three weeks of negotiation, his model was approved in principle by the 24 nations present. The date line was to cross the Pacific exactly opposite the zero meridian because no nation had to be “divided” here.

The conference left the French discontented because they were unable to gain acceptance for their own model and also ended with the humbling of Sanford Fleming. Today, however, they have both won because since 1926 time has been determined in Paris by atomic clocks. This Universal Coordinated Time (UCT) instead of the former Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is distributed worldwide from Paris via satellites.

Anderesen Geneve 1884 World Time Watch (2004)

The time system designed by Sanford Fleming was based on a unified notion, i.e. that of the time running through the zero meridian. He imagined that local time would always be determined with reference to GMT. A clock would have to display GMT plus or minus the hours difference for the local time zone and then the minutes.

With his “1884” model, Svend Andersen and his team has designed a watch that reproduces Fleming’s world time concept. The dial represents an image of Fleming’s model. In the centre, a world map showing the meridians together with a dot marking Washington, the conference city, and Greenwich, the origin of the zero meridian. The ring around the globe shows the 24 hours. When this ring is rotated it always indicates the current local time for the cities or time zones on the outer ring. Through the back of the watch, a historical automatic movement can be admired together with the engraved portrait of Fleming.

To mark the 120th anniversary of this conference which made its mark on our daily lives, Andersen Genève made 120 individually numbered watches. They are obtainable with cases in red gold, white gold or platinum. The «1884» is just one of several world time watches which Andersen Genève has already made, including his Christophorus Columbus” in 1992.

Technical details

Model: Anderesen Geneve 1884  World Time Watch

Limited edition
50 watches with a red gold case
50 watches with a white gold case
20 watches with a platinum case

Movement
Automatic, extra-flat universal time module
Portrait and name of Sir Sandford Fleming engraved on the rotor

Functions
Hours, minutes, 24 time zones, day/night indicator

Case
750 (18C) red gold, 750 (18C) white gold, or platinum
Individual number and commemorative engraving
Sapphire crystal and back

Dial
Sky blue
World map and 24 time zones

Strap
Hand-sewn, brown crocodile leather

Links

Quinting Transparency

Launched in 2004, the Transparency is the second line of the watches Quinting. With its 3 hands (hour, minute and second) and its smaller case (39 mm) in comparison to the other models, this watch with its pure and sober lines suits both to the men and women.

Its dial which can be in a circle or octagonal shape can be polished, brushed or set with diamonds. In stainless steel or in gold18kt, the Transparency is an ethereal and refined piece, with an extreme sophistication.

Quinting Transparency

The Transparency has a counter balancing forces movement which permits to compensate the effects of rough gestures. Besides the technical advantage brought by this revolutionary process, this movement also permits to bring a real animation to the design.

The Transparency is like all the other models of Quinting a great complication watch which is composed of 186 pieces. Its movement contains 9 layers of sapphires perfectly parallel, 4 are mobiles and 5 are stationary. It is waterproof until 50 meters depth.

The watch is composed of metalized sapphires and has an anti-reflection treatment. The case back and the movement are engraved with an individual serial number. The unique transparent movement is patented as well as the counter balancing forces movement.

Technical details

Case
Thickness: 9,12 mm
Diameter: 39 mm
Water resistance: 50 meters (5 ATM)

Movement
Number of sapphire layers: 9 perfectly parallel sapphire discs
Warranty: 2 years
Adjustment: +0.10 – 0.60 sec/j

Functions
Hours’ hand
Minutes’ hand
Seconds’ hand

Available with:
Alligator strap with Quinting buckle
Stainless steel, yellow gold, pink gold or white gold
Dial with or without diamond setting
Bezel with or without diamond setting

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Turn-O-Graph

The Rolex Oyster Perpetual Turn-O-Graph features a fluted bidirectional rotatable graduated bezel, giving it a truly distinctive identity. Launched in 1953, it was initially designed to measure short periods of time.

A new version was introduced in 2004, and the Turn-O-Graph is now available in yellow, white or Everose Rolesor. Its red seconds hand, numerals and date also contribute to its special allure.

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Turn-O-Graph

Self-winding, equipped with a Perpetual rotor and certified by the Swiss Official Chronometer Testing Institute (COSC), the Oyster Perpetual Turn-O-Graph is guaranteed waterproof to a depth of 100 metres (330 feet) and features a sapphire crystal with a Cyclops lens.

References

  • Rolex Oyster Perpetual Turn-O-Graph 116264: Stainless steel case and bracelet,  18K white gold bezel.
  • Rolex Oyster Perpetual Turn-O-Graph 116263:  Stainless steel case, 18K yellow gold bezel, stainless steel bracelet with middle links in 18K yellow gold.
  • Rolex Oyster Perpetual Turn-O-Graph 116261: Stainless steel case, 18K rose gold bezel, stainless steel bracelet with middle links in 18K rose gold.

Technical details

  • Calibre 3135
  • Self-winding movement with Perpetual rotor
  • Power reserve: 48 hours
  • 31 jewels
  • Date: Instantaneous change
  • Oscillator Frequency: 4 Hz (28,800 beats/hour), hairspring with Breguet overcoil
  • Chronometer COSC certification
  • Diameter: 36 mm
  • Materials: Yellow, white or Everose Rolesor
  • Case: Fluted bidirectional rotatable 60-minute graduated bezel
  • Waterproofness: 100 m (330 ft)
  • Crown: Twinlock
  • Crystal: Sapphire with Cyclops lens
  • Bracelets: Oyster with Oyster-clasp and Easy-link comfort extension link. Jubilee with Crown clasp

Thomas Prescher Tourbillon Trilogy – Single Axis Tourbillon, Double Axis Tourbillon and Triple Axis Tourbillon

In 2003, Thomas Prescher became the first watchmaker to offer a double axis tourbillon pocketwatch. Just one short year later, he exhibited yet another world premiere: a triple axis tourbillon wristwatch as part of the Tourbillon Trilogy.

The Tourbillon Trilogy is a unique set of three tourbillon wristwatches comprising single, double, and triple axis flying tourbillons with constant force escapements. Each, encased in platinum, possesses a distinctive shape and various visual design features that share a common platform.

Thomas Prescher Tourbillon Trilogy - Single Axis Tourbillon, Double Axis Tourbillon and Triple Axis Tourbillon

Although single axis wristwatch tourbillons are no longer rarities today, only occasionally are they flying tourbillons, and it is absolutely unique to find a flying tourbillon with a constant force mechanism within a tourbillon cage. The Tourbillon Trilogy is only offered in platinum in a limited series of ten sets. However, separate editions of each wristwatch are now available individually and in various case materials.

Thomas Prescher Single Axis Tourbillon

The single axis tourbillon was invented by Abraham-Louis Breguet in 1801 to counteract the effects of gravity in pocket watches and improve their rates. Pocket watches were generally carried in the vest pocket in a vertical position, which was why Breguet’s invention only worked on pocket watches in this position.

Thomas Prescher Single Axis Tourbillon

Once the watch was laid flat, on a table for instance with the dial up or down, the entire effect of the tourbillon was voided and no longer affected the rate.

Thomas Prescher Single Axis Tourbillon

Technical details

Movement
Flying tourbillon construction: Movement, Caliber TP 3W6A.1, designed and constructed in-house; First single axis tourbillon wristwatch with constant force mechanism in the carriage; Tourbillon is secured in a specially designed flexible spring to absorb shocks.
Diameter: 37 mm
Height: 5.43 mm
Number of components: 277
Weight of smallest screw used: 0.0009 grams
Number of jewels: 37
Frequency: 21600 beats per hour (3 Hz)
Number of spring barrels: two
Plates and bridges: Gold-plated brass, hand-engraved with Guilloché Triangulair
Balance wheel: Copper-beryllium CuBe2
Balance spring: Flat hairspring
Power reserve: 40 hours
Number of sub-dials: two
Functions: hours, minutes, seconds

Tourbillon
Number of axes: one
Height of tourbillon rotation 12.2 mm
Revolution time: one minute
Constant force mechanism in tourbillon cage
System of constant force inertia acceleration according to Jaenneret
Constant force reloading :6 times per second
Diameter of balance wheel :9.5 mm
Diameter of cage :13.4 mm
Tourbillon weight :0.347 grams.

Case
Platinum 950 or 18-karat gold
Crystal: Convex sapphire crystal on front and back, anti-reflective on both sides, hand-engraved with individual number
Case Dimensions: 43 mm x 43 mm; Height: 12.3 mm
Water resistance: 1 ATM (10 meters)

Dial
1.2 mm solid silver, hand guilloché with Guilloché Triangulair 18-karat gold applied indexes; 18-karat gold dauphine style hands; 18-karat gold hand-engraved name and number plate

Strap
Hand-cut and –sewn black alligator skin uppers and lowers
Buckle: Platinum 950 or 18-karat gold

Thomas Prescher Double Axis Tourbillon

In the 1970s, an Englishman named Anthony G. Randall created a double axis tourbillon for clocks – more as an intellectual exercise than to actually address the issues of rate deviation mentioned above. He built a carriage clock based on these principles, adding the double axis tourbillon.

In a double axis tourbillon, the second axis revolves parallel to the dial, influencing the rate positively when the watch or clock is positioned with the dial up or down. Thus, this mechanism has an advantageous influence on the rate of all six positions.

Thomas Prescher Double Axis Tourbillon

Since the double axis tourbillon can only realize its full potential in wearable watches, Thomas Prescher first examined his possibilities in a pocket watch so that the feasibility of his vision could be examined and later added to a wristwatch version. It turned out that directly miniaturizing the same arrangement of components was not possible.

Thomas Prescher Double Axis Tourbillon

Problems concerning weight distribution, gearing, and friction of the micro mechanisms led to completely different reactions than in Randall’s clock since the smallest component of the new mechanism weighed a mere 0.0009 grams. The tourbillon had to be designed entirely new, most especially because Thomas Prescher wanted to create a flying tourbillon version.

Technical details

Movement
Flying tourbillon construction on both axes – Movement, Caliber TP 3W6A.2, designed and constructed in-house:First single axis tourbillon wristwatch with constant force mechanism in the carriage;Tourbillon is secured in a specially designed flexible spring to absorb shocks.
Dimensions: 37 x 37 mm
Height: 5.43 mm
Number of components: 279
Weight of smallest screw used: 0.0009 grams
Number of jewels: 37
Frequency: 21600 beats per hour (3 Hz)
Number of spring barrels: two
Plates and bridges: gold-plated brass, hand-engraved with Guilloché Triangulair
Balance wheel: copper-beryllium CuBe2
Balance spring: flat hairspring
Power reserve: 40 hours
Number of subdials: two

Functions 
Hours, minutes, seconds

Tourbillon
Number of axes: two
Height of tourbillon rotation: 12.2 mm
Revolution time: one minute
Constant force mechanism on first axis in tourbillon cage
System of constant force inertia acceleration according to Jaenneret
Constant force reloading: 6 times per second
Diameter of balance wheel: 9.5 mm
Diameter of cage: 13.4 mm
Tourbillon weight first axis 0.347 grams
Weight of first and second axes 0.766 grams

Case
Platinum 950 or 18-karat gold
Crystal: convex sapphire crystal on front and back, anti-reflective on both sides, hand-engraved with individual number
Dimensions: 43 mm x 43 mm
Height: 16.1 mm
Water resistance: 1 ATM (10 meters)

Dial
1.2 mm solid silver, hand guilloché with Guilloché Triangulair; 18-karat gold applied indexes; 18-karat gold dauphine style hands;18-karat gold hand-engraved name and number plate

Strap
Hand-cut and –sewn black alligator skin uppers and lowers
Buckle: Platinum 950 or 18-karat gold

Thomas Prescher Triple Axis Tourbillon

The creation of a set of three types of tourbillons required Thomas Prescher to invent a third individual construction. Inspired by Randall’s work, Richard Good became the first clockmaker to add a triple axis tourbillon to a carriage clock in the 1980s. Thomas Prescher took out his old apprenticeship notebooks containing his sketches and interpretation of Good’s work in creating a triple axis tourbillon carriage clock.

Thomas Prescher Triple Axis Tourbillon

He wanted to modify this for use in a wristwatch. Spurred on by the success of his pocket watches, Thomas Prescher set to work further miniaturizing these multiple axis mechanics. He met the challenge and added a third axis that revolved once every hour.

The construction of such a tourbillon wristwatch was considered long impossible: it was thought that the movement height would be too great for practical use and that the weight of the additional components would not let enough energy get through to the balance. However, Thomas Prescher found a number of solutions to address these issues. The meaning of such a complicated timepiece is much more art for art’s sake than the search for any improvement of a rate.

Thomas Prescher Triple Axis Tourbillon

A triple axis tourbillon with its spiral-shaped movement takes up far more room in the space of a case than either the single or the double axis tourbillons. It is especially the unencumbered view that makes the tourbillon seem to hover in the air on its three flying axes. A triple axis tourbillon is not only a technical masterpiece of the art of watchmaking, but it is above all a piece of art that draws our eyes to it – magically – a kinetic sculpture of time.

Technical details

Movement
Flying tourbillon construction on all axes; Movement, Caliber TP 3W6A.3, designed and constructed in-house; First triple axis tourbillon wristwatch with constant force mechanism in the carriage; Tourbillon is secured in a specially designed flexible spring to absorb shocks.
Diameter: 37 mm
Height: 6.46 mm
Number of components: 327
Weight of smallest screw used: 0.0009 grams
Number of jewels: 47
Frequency: 21600 beats per hour (3 Hz)
Number of spring barrels: two
Plates and bridges: gold-plated brass, hand-engraved with Guilloché Triangulair
Balance wheel: copper-beryllium CuBe2
Balance spring: flat hairspring
Power reserve: 36 hours
Number of subdials: two

Functions 
Hours, minutes, seconds

Tourbillon
Number of axes: three
Height of tourbillon rotation: 12.2 mm
Revolution time: one minute
Constant force mechanism on first axis in tourbillon cage
System of constant force inertia acceleration according to Jaenneret
Constant force reloading: 6 times per second
Diameter of balance wheel: 9.5 mm
Diameter of cage: 13.4 mm
Tourbillon weight first axis: 0.347 grams
Weight of first and second axes: 0.766 grams
Weight of first, second, and third axes with ball bearing: 2.879 grams

Case
Platinum 950 or 18-karat gold
Crystal convex sapphire crystal on front and back, anti-reflective on both sides, hand-engraved with individual number
Diameter: 43 mm
Height: 16.1 mm
Water resistance: 1 ATM (10 meters)

Dial
1.2 mm solid silver, hand guilloché with Guilloché Triangulair; 18-karat gold applied indexes; 18-karat gold dauphine-style hands; 18-karat gold hand-engraved name and number plate

Strap
Hand-cut and –sewn black alligator skin uppers and lowers
Buckle: Platinum 950 or 18-karat gold

More details

The creation of a tourbillon is considered the highest horological achievement for a watchmaker. Extremely high tolerances in combination with an extremely low weight  factor required for the manufacturing and assembly of the miniscule parts demand an especially balanced hand and precise eye.

Working on a tourbillon is one of the greatest challenges in watchmaking – a challenge that is magnified by double and triple axis tourbillons. Watchmaking at this level requires matching visual distinction to complement the extraordinary mechanisms.

At an early developmental stage of the Tourbillon Trilogy, Thomas Prescher decided not to use the same case shape for each piece, but to differentiate each tourbillon with its own personal visualization. The basic design elements that each of the watches share ensure recognition of the fact that they belong to together in the Trilogy set.

Thomas Prescher devoted the first sketches to the search for various basic geometric forms that would still retain formal harmony among the three tourbillons. From these sketches, the perfection of the circle for the extraordinary triple axis and the simple square shape for the single axis were defined as the two basic shapes of the set – like magnetic or electrical impulses; the plus and minus. The carrée cambrée shape of the double axis tourbillon’s case represents the metamorphosis of the square to the circle, a transient in motion between two extremes.

The so-called divine proportions form the mathematical rule of perfect harmony, which originates in the most beautiful geometrical examples found in nature. Thomas Prescher followed this rule to come up with the proportions of the main dials and little subdials. The smallest unit is the second, so the subsidiary dial for seconds is logically the smallest, with the hour and minute subdials proportionally larger according to the rule of divine proportions.

The perfect size of the tourbillon window, which allows a view of the open heart of the movement itself, was determined in exactly the same manner.

Guilloché generally evokes an old-fashioned, classic eighteenth century atmosphere on a watch dial – logical, since this form of embellishment was used on watch dials made by the hands of the great masters from that period and beyond. For the dials of the timepieces in the Tourbillon Trilogy set, Thomas Prescher invented a new guilloché pattern that allows the eye an undistracted view of the tourbillon’s highly complex motion.

The traditional creamy silver, even patterned guilloché décor would have been too «antique» in feeling. The solution was found in the creation of a unique handmade guilloché pattern especially designed for the set that Thomas Prescher christened Guilloché Triangulair. Here, another basic form, that of the equilateral triangle, was chosen for the guilloché pattern’s cell structure, providing a higher number of sides to the viewer that seem to «change direction » under different lighting situations – always in motion, just like the tourbillon itself.

The majority of tourbillon wristwatches on the market today are not of the flying variety; that is to say, they are generally outfitted with a fairly large tourbillon bridge on the dial side. Even if these bridges are beautiful in shape, they continue to block the view of the tourbillon.

The flying tourbillons created by the Thomas Prescher have no need for such a bridge, thus providing a supremely clear view of the tourbillon escapement. This is accentuated by the fact that the tourbillon opening is transparent on both the dial and movement side, providing a view of the tourbillon so clear that it seems suspended in space.

Many different forms of decoration are traditionally available for gracing the movement, or back, of the watch. Once the decision was made to create a new guilloché pattern for the dial, Thomas Prescher abandoned more traditional decorative patterns such as Geneva stripes as they did not fit his whole artistic vision for the Tourbillon Trilogy.

In detailed studies of the dial and movement decoration, he developed a solution in which both are joined to form a unit. Inspired by music, the existing triangular pattern of the dial was repeated three times in slightly different variations, like in a sonata.

Thus, the pattern characterized by art deco developed into an ever more complex form as it progressed from the single axis version to the triple axis model. It climaxes in the floral design elements of the bridge on the triple axis tourbillon, which acts, similar to a sonata, as a counterpoint. In this way, each individual dial fully harmonizes with its movement decoration, and the three models of the Tourbillon Trilogy melodiously harmonize with each other.

BREITLING for Bentley Grande Complication Bentley Masterpiece 2004 – One of a Kind Pocket Watch with Chronograph, Minute Repeater and Perpetual Calendar

This one of a kind grand complication watch was created in 2003-04. The Grande Complication Bentley Masterpiece was assembled on the basis of a century-old ébauche or movement blank from the Breitling archives. Over a year’s work was required to produce it. The Caliber 117 powering the Bentley Masterpiece is equipped with Minute Repeater, Perpetual Calendar and Chronograph functions.

BREITLING for Bentley Grande Complication Bentley Masterpiece 2004 - One of a Kind Pocket Watch with Chronograph, Minute Repeater and Perpetual Calendar

Not only does this mechanical masterpiece strike the hours, quarters and minutes (on request), but its perpetual calendar also indicates the date, the day of the week and the month – taking account of leap years – and even reveals the different phases of the moon during its rotation around the earth. Its single-pushpiece chronograph mechanism indicates 1/5ths of a second.

The finishing of this 19-lignes movement is extremely refined. The decorative “côtes de Genève” ribbing combines with circular-grained motifs; the surfaces of the components are drawn out with a file to create elegant parallel lines; the steel parts and bridges are meticulously hand-bevelled and their chamfer is polished,as are the screw-heads and the jewels. The spectacular beauty of this complex architecture is revealed through a transparent caseback.

The 18-carat gold hunter-type case is composed of six parts and adorned on the cover and back with a signature Bentley motif.

The Grande Complication Bentley Masterpiece watch was put on sale by Sotheby’s year end auctions in 2004, but this unique pocket was acquired by an American collector before the sales event.

GOLDPFEIL GENEVE Moon Phases Automatic Watch

Launched in 2004, the Moon phases watch by Goldpfeil Genève draws its inspiration from the Regulator clocks of yesteryear, used in watchmaking workshops as a master clock to which the others clocks and watches were set.

To fulfill their role, they featured a centre minute hand and an off-centred hour hand moving over a separate subdial. This interpretation of the traditional principle is graced by a beautifully balanced dial configuration, with the hour subdial, small seconds and moon phase window arranged to exquisite effect.

GOLDPFEIL GENEVE Moon Phases Automatic Watch

Like all guilloché dials by Goldpfeil Genève, this superb example is in silver, lending special luminosity and brilliance to this evocation of a starlit sky. The superb brand-exclusive blued steel hands, and the hand-stitched sand-coloured alligator strap with its exclusive buckle conveys the love of fine craftsmanship.

GOLDPFEIL GENEVE Moon Phases Automatic Watch

Technical details

Movement
Automatic

Functions
Hours, minutes, seconds, moon-phases

Case
750 (18C) white gold
Sapphire crystal and back
Water resistant to 30 m

Dial
Engine-turned silver
Hands in blue steel

Strap
Hand-stitched sand-coloured alligator, exclusive buckle in 750 (18C) white gold

OMEGA Speedmaster Michael Schumacher “The Legend” Limited Edition

This limited edition version of the legendary Speedmaster timepiece was launched in 2004 to celebrate the record-breaking achievements of Michael Schumacher and the Ferrari Formula 1 team in 2003. Bearing subtle traces of Ferrari’s and OMEGA’s signature red and a highly distinctive dial, the Speedmaster “Legend” watch pays tribute to Michael Schumacher, the most successful F1 driver in recent times.

This commemorative limited-edition model has a 38.8mm stainless steel case and a brushed-steel bezel engraved with the Speedmaster’s characteristic tachymeter scale. It has a distinctive matt silvered dial with black chronograph counters and a white-on-black date window at 6 o’clock. Rhodium-plated, facetted baguette-style hour markers and an applied OMEGA symbol add a touch of refinement, whereas the Speedmaster name in red perfectly complements the sporty red-on-black minute track with ¼ second subdivisions. The luminous “stick” hands also recall the legendary Moon Watch.

OMEGA Speedmaster Michael Schumacher "The Legend" Limited Edition

This collectors’ piece is powered by the OMEGA calibre 3301 self-winding column-wheel chronograph movement. The movement display the hours and minutes centrally, with a sub-dial at 9 o’clock for the continuous seconds display. The chronograph functions comprise a central seconds hand with totalisers for 30 minutes situated at 3 o’clock and for 12 hours at 6 o’clock. The calibre 3301 has a power reserve of 55 hours and is also an officially certified COSC chronometer.

This timepiece was produced in a limited edition of 6000 pieces and each model has its individual number engraved around the edge of the case back (in the form 0001/6000) along with the inscription “Sixth Title Limited Edition”.

This timepiece is fitted with a matching stainless-steel bracelet with push-button operated fold-over clasp.  The centre of the case back bears the inscription “Michael Schumacher / The Legend” in red. Thanks to a screw-in case back and screw-in crown, the Speedmaster “Legend” watch is water resistant to 100 metres.

Omega Museum Collection 2004 – Centenary Watch

The Omega Museum celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2004. In recognition of this milestone, Omega chose a watch with an even greater historical significance for its annual Museum Collection piece. The fifth watch in this collection is a reproduction of the Centenary watch produced for the company’s 100th birthday in 1948, which was also the first self-winding Omega wrist chronometer.

In keeping with the Museum Collection philosophy, the 21st century reproduction of the Centenary watch remains faithful to the design of the original. The watch is characterised by the sleek lines of its period case in 18-carat red gold with distinctive lyre-shaped lugs. It has a coppered dial that is separated into two zones – a vertically brushed centre section and a sun-brushed outer hour ring – by a classic “railway” minute track.

The hour ring has applied Arabic numerals at 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock, applied triangular hour markers at 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock and applied lozenge-shaped hour markers for the remaining hours. The time is displayed by polished bevelled Dauphine hour and minute hands with a countersunk small seconds dial on circular snailing in the centre zone above 6 o’clock.
Omega Museum Collection 2004 - Centenary WatchThe watch is completed by simple polished 18-carat red gold bezel and a domed, scratch-resistant sapphire crystal with interior anti-reflective treatment. Whilst the original model was available as a limited-edition in two sizes, fitted either with a 28.10mm (2000 pieces) or 30.10mm (4000 pieces) calibre, the contemporary model is available exclusively in a 36mm diameter case that houses the Omega calibre 2202 Co-Axial chronometer movement.

This unique movement, fitted with the revolutionary Omega Co-Axial Escapement that reduces friction and prolongs the movement’s life, has a 48-hour power reserve and official COSC chronometer certification.

The combination of traditional design with the latest in watchmaking technology is also reflected in a subtle change on the dial, which, in addition to the original applied Omega symbol and period lettering, sees the original inscription “Automatic” replaced with “Co-Axial” – a term that only Omega watches can boast. And despite its 1940s design, the watch meets all of Omega’s strict quality requirements, notably being water resistant to 30 metres/100 feet.

With such a restricted production run, the original Centenary watch was destined to remain unique. However, it was so successful that Omega soon had to find a suitable replacement. This came in 1952 with the now world-famous Constellation. As with the original model, production of the 2004 Omega Centenary is also limited – as for all Museum Collection pieces – to the quantity corresponding with the year of the original.

The individual limited number (0001/1948) is engraved in the centre of a zoned case back together with the Omega symbol and name. The four sections surrounding the centre bear the inscription “THE OMEGA MUSEUM COLLECTION”, “THE CENTENARY WATCH”, “COLLECTORS’ SERIES NUMBER FIVE” and the year of the original, 1948. Like the original model, this limited-edition reproduction is sure to be coveted among watch collectors.

BLANCPAIN Tourbillon Léman

Introduced in 2004 in a limited edition of 50 in each colour of gold, this exclusive complication model is equipped with a flying tourbillon, big date and power reserve. Available in pink or white gold versions, it houses the Blancpain 6925 automatic flying tourbillon calibre featuring an Oscillating weight in gold.

This movement has an outstanding power reserve of 7 days. The Opaline dial features faceted appliqué hour markers in gold and big, sports-type hands. This haute horlogerie model displays Tourbillon at 12 o’clock, big date at 6 o’clock and power reserve at 9 o’clock.

BLANCPAIN Tourbillon Léman

Technical details

Movement
Automatic, calibre Blancpain 6925 with flying tourbillon
Oscillating weight in gold, chiselled and rhodium-plated, fine pearling

Functions
Hours, minutes, seconds, date, power reserve

Case
750 (18C) pink or white gold, 38 mm
Screw-down crown
Calendar corrector on the case-middle at 8 o’clock
Cambered sapphire crystal
Screw-down sapphire back
Water-resistant to 100 m

Dial
Opaline
Faceted appliqué hour markers in gold
Big, sports-type hands
Tourbillon at 12 o’clock, big date at 6 o’clock, power reserve at 9 o’clock

Strap
Genuine crocodile leather

CHOPARD L.U.C 4R – Quattro Regulateur (2004)

Introduced in 2004, the L.U.C 4R – Quattro Regulateur is an award winning timepiece (Watch of the Year 2004 by Montres Passion and Uhrenwelt). Its exceptional nine-day power reserve, adjustable time Zone with remarkable technical performance and the fascinating regulator-type time display make this watch a collector’s piece.

This timepiece is equipped with mechanical, “L.U.C Quattro 1.98” calibre COSC-certified chronometer and was produced in 18ct yellow and white gold versions.

CHOPARD L.U.C 4R - Quattro Regulateur (2004)

Technical details

Movement
Mechanical, “L.U.C Quattro 1.98” calibre
COSC-certified chronometer, poinçon de Genève
4 barrels
39 rubies, 28,800 V/h
Côtes de Genève patterning

Functions
Hours, minutes, seconds, date, second time zone, power reserve

Case
750 (18C) yellow gold or
750 (18C) white gold, 39.5 mm
Antiglare cambered sapphire crystal, sapphire back

Dial
Engine-turned gold, gold hands
Time display at 3 o’clock
Seconds and date at 6 o’clock
Second time zone at 9 o’clock and power reserve at 12 o’clock

Bracelet/Strap
Hand-sewn crocodile, brown or black

OMEGA Central Tourbillon (Skeleton and Diamond-Set Versions)

This haute horlogerie product from OMEGA houses a highly complex tourbillon mechanism, the most challenging horology complication which still remains the very pinnacle of the watchmaker’s art since it was invented by the inspirational watchmaker Abraham Louis Breguet in the late 1700s. To this day, tourbillon watches are still assembled by hand due to their extreme complexity, with only relatively few pieces produced each year.

OMEGA’s Central Tourbillon is already established as a fine example of this art. Omega’s Central Tourbillon is unique, since its tourbillon mechanism is located at the very centre of the watch. The flying tourbillon cage in the self-winding movement, which has a 45-hour power reserve, makes one revolution every minute and, with an Omega symbol mounted directly on the tourbillon cage, therefore acts as an extremely elegant seconds hand.

The Omega calibre 2633’s bridges have been painstakingly hollowed and hand chased to offer the best possible view of the intricate workings of this mechanical marvel. The skeletonised Central Tourbillon watch is available exclusively with a platinum case and polished platinum bezel with black alligator leather strap and 18-carat white gold foldover clasp.

OMEGA Central Tourbillon (Skeleton and Diamond-Set Versions)

For those looking for an equally luxurious version of the Central Tourbillon, but not wishing to forego the traditional look and exclusiveness of a hand-made and individually numbered guilloché dial found on the “standard” model, Omega also offers versions set with 24 baguette diamonds (4.08 ct) on the bezel. These are available in platinum with a rhodium dial or 18-carat yellow, red or white gold with a silver dial.

The platinum model has a black alligator leather strap with white-gold foldover clasp, whereas the gold models have a brown alligator leather strap with matching foldover clasp in 18-carat yellow, red or white gold. With the exception of the skeletonised model, each OMEGA Central Tourbillon is personalised with an individual sequential number at 6 o’clock on the dial according to the relevant model.

With the tourbillon mechanism taking pride of place in full view at the centre of the watch, a unique system is used to display the time: the Alpha-style hour and minute hands are etched on to two separate sapphire discs with anti-reflective treatment on both sides. The two discs rotate around the centre axis to display the time. For all Central Tourbillon models, the classic De Ville Co-Axial case guarantees water resistance to 30 metres/100 feet.

As a rare example of a self-winding tourbillon movement, all Omega Central Tourbillon watches come with their own unique presentation box in the form of a watch winder. This rotating box ensures that the watch stays fully wound even when it is not being worn. Omega produces only a handful of Central Tourbillon models each year.

Omega Constellation Double Eagle Chronograph

Combining the finest mechanical timekeeping with the Double Eagle’s thoroughly modern and masculine design, the Constellation Double Eagle Chronographs represent the top of the range in the Double Eagle collection.

The Double Eagle chronograph models (introduced in 2004) are equipped with the Omega calibre 3313 movement featuring unique and revolutionary Co-Axial Escapement, which reduces friction in the movement and offers better long-term accuracy.

The Double Eagle chronograph also has a column-wheel chronograph mechanism. The column-wheel chronograph ensures precision operation of the chronograph functions, with a vertical coupling ensuring zero delay in the start, stop and reset functions.

Omega Constellation Double Eagle Chronograph

In the Double Eagle chronograph, the Omega 3313 has an intricate rhodium-plated finish of circular graining, Geneva wave decor and gold-plated engravings, with a blue-steel screw as the centrepiece of this mechanical and aesthetic marvel. As a prestige movement, it naturally boasts top specifications, with official COSC chronometer certification and a self-winding mechanism that gives the watch a power reserve of 55 hours.

The completely redesigned case used for the Constellation Double Eagle has been enlarged by 3mm to 41mm to accommodate the chronograph movement. It maintains the typical Constellation features, with the four distinguishing polished stainless-steel “claws” that clamp the bezel to the case contrasting elegantly with the brushed stainless-steel finish of the case and bezel, which bears stamped Roman numerals – another distinctive feature of the Constellation line.

Omega Constellation Double Eagle Chronograph

The asymmetric design of the claws presents a more modern interpretation of the Constellation look and at the same time protects the time-setting crown. The brushed-steel bracelet, with its polished stainless-steel linking bars, offers a similar contrast and is fitted with an elegantly symmetrical butterfly clasp that is totally concealed when closed, further accentuating the sleek lines of the watch.

The chronograph version of the Double Eagle is available with a polished lacquered white dial or a matt black dial, both of which have facetted rhodium-plated hour markers and facetted, rhodium plated and truncated Dauphine hands.

The high quality of the watch is reflected in an attention to detail that includes an applied Omega symbol and name and rhodium-plated rings surrounding the chronograph counters and small seconds sub-dial. A date window at 6 o’clock completes the high-end Omega chronograph look, which is protected by a domed, scratch-resistant sapphire crystal with anti-reflective treatment on both sides.

True to the sporty origins of the chronograph, the Double Eagle remains a robust watch for all seasons, with its screw-in case helping to guarantee water resistance to 100 metres.

OMEGA Speedmaster Professional Special Edition “From the Moon to the Mars”

Launched in 2004 on the occasion of the 35th anniversary of the moon landing, the Special-Edition “From the Moon the Mars” timepiece looks forward to more exciting decades of space exploration on the way from the Moon to Mars.

Though the first maps of Mars date back to the early 17th century, mankind’s first “close encounter” with the red planet was in 1965, when the American probe Mariner 4 sent back 21 images. Thanks to the prevailing political environment stimulating the space race between Americans and Soviets, it was only 4 years later that mankind took its first steps on the Moon.

Whilst other lunar landings followed, with the end of the Cold War space exploration concentrated more on scientific and research aspects, centred on the use of the space shuttle and space stations. In 2004, fuelled by the success of the two Mars Rover projects, space agencies like NASA decided to accelerate one of the most ambitious projects of mankind – the conquest of Mars.

This ambitious project comprises of: a robotic exploration of the Moon, a new Crewed Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the first CEV flight and finally an extended human space missions by 2015 and a return to the Moon by 2020.

The Omega Speedmaster Professional, the first ever wristwatch qualified for space travel remains as popular as ever, with its “flight-qualified” credentials still serving as a guarantee of its robustness and precision. Having successfully withstood the journey to the moon and a short stay on its surface during various Apollo missions, the Speedmaster could quite conceivably return there with the astronauts in 2020.

However, a voyage to Mars would impose new constraints on watches and timekeeping. In addition to coping with an average temperature of -53°C, as well as local, regional and global dust storms, the Mars watch may also need to take into account the longer Martian day (the “sol”), which is equivalent to 1.027 Earth days.

OMEGA Speedmaster Professional Special Edition "From the Moon to the Mars"

In 2004, Omega introduced a special Speedmaster Professional timepiece to match the tougher specifications required for future space explorations. The special-edition Speedmaster “From the Moon the Mars” bears all the hallmarks of the original “Moon Watch”, with the same robust case, functional bezel with tachymeter scale and sober matt black dial with luminous baton hands. It also shares the hand-wound calibre 1861 that is legendary among mechanical watch enthusiasts for its precision and reliability, offering a power reserve of 45 hours when fully wound.

The transfers of the Earth, the Moon and Mars in the chronograph counters and small seconds counter on the dial clearly indicate the commemorative purpose of this timepiece, as does the inscription “From the Moon to Mars” found on the dial between 5 and 3 o’clock as well as engraved on the case back. As a further touch of exclusivity, each piece also bears its own individual sequential number on the case back.

ANONIMO Match Racing Valencia

Issued at Basel Exhibition 2004, this watch is dedicated to those who are passionately interested in sea and particularly to those who love that kind of regatta whose name this watch is proud of.

ANONIMO Match Racing Valencia

Attractive design, innovative material and interesting performance for a watch that cannot be missing on a skipper’s wrist. A revolutionary timepiece, the first chronograph in the world featuring the dial centre minute hand for the match racing countdown.

Technical details

Model: ANONIMO Match Racing Valencia

Movement
Automatic chronograph DUBOIS DEPRAZ module 2073 on base ETA 2892A2; 46 jewels, colimaçon and soigné finish; adjusted 4 positions, 28.800 A7h. Power reserve 40 hours.

Functions
Hours, minutes, small seconds at h. 3. Dial-center countdown minute and second hands. Hour counter at h. 6 (12 hours). Synchronized auxiliary 24 hours counter at h. 9 with day/night functions evidenced by double colors.

Watch Case
Sand-blasted AISI316 Plus stainless steel with Ox-Pro blackening treatment process and passivation of the watch case surface with antireflection and anticorrosion functions; diameter 42.00 mm. Sand-blasted screw locked bezel (4 screws). Screw locked satinated back cover. Screw locked stainless steel crown and push buttons. Domed sapphire crystal. Water Resistance 12 ATM

Dial
Oversized dial with specific “applique” ten minute count-down scale between 12 and 2. “Applique” day/night scale for 24 hours counter. Color coded reaching indicators at wind angles, flags and signs. Hour indexes treated with luminous coating for superior day/night readability. Blue Superluminova treated baton hour and minute hands, small seconds and 24 hour hands. Dial-center minute hand, second counter and 12 hours counter hands in red.

Wrist Strap
Manufactured in washable leather “Opera Kodiak” for extended immersions in water (24 continuous hours). Anonimo engraved on reverse of exclusive stainless steel buckle.

OMEGA Railmaster 49.2mm

Launched in 2004, the OMEGA Railmaster 49.2mm timepiece boasts a classic Railmaster design which recalls the brand’s first official railway pocket watches. Equipped with a manual winding mechanical pocket watch movement, the Railmaster 49.2mm is one of the company’s largest wristwatches ever made.

The original OMEGA Railmaster was first launched in 1957 and upheld an already longstanding association between OMEGA and rail transport. Whereas the company had been supplying official (pocket) watches for railway companies worldwide since 1895, the Railmaster was its first wristwatch designed specially for railway workers, scientists, technicians and electricians, or indeed anyone else working in or around powerful electric currents, it had a special double antimagnetic case to protect the watch movement from the harmful effects of these electrical fields.

OMEGA Railmaster 49.2mm manual wound watch

The dimensions (49.2mm) of this wristwatch stand in direct contrast to its otherwise subtle design, which retains the same understated elegance as the original 1957 model, with its classic symmetrical stainless-steel case and a simple polished stainless-steel bezel.

The matt black dial bears Arabic numerals inset with SuperLuminova luminous material which, given their size, ensure optimum legibility even in the dark. Furthermore, to enhance its connection with historical pocket watches, the Railmaster 49.2mm displays a small-seconds sub-dial at 6 o’clock.

The Railmaster 49.2mm is equipped with the 16.5 lines (37.2 mm) manual-winding pocket watch calibre 2201, a high precision movement with 60-hour power reserve and official certification from the independent Swiss chronometer testing institute (COSC). The Railmaster 49.2mm is also the first wristwatch for a number of years to be fitted with a pocket watch movement.

The large sapphire crystal case back gives a clear view of the fine decoration of the movement, with Geneva wave décor, circular graining and bevelled bridges. A similar sapphire crystal covers the dial, with its anti-reflective treatment on both sides further improving the high legibility of this time piece.

This imposing Railmaster model is fitted with a brown alligator leather strap with push-button fold-over clasp and is water resistant to 150 metres.

OMEGA Speedmaster Professional 35th Moon Landing Anniversary Edition

The OMEGA Speedmaster Professional 35th Moon Landing Anniversary Edition timepiece was launched in 2004 to mark the 35th anniversary the first lunar landing. This historical event also witnessed a rise of legendary line – the OMEGA Speedmaster – in the world of exceptional watches.

Thanks to this unforgettable moment, but more importantly thanks to the expertise and reliability that led to the Speedmaster being selected for manned spaceflight missions in the first place, the Speedmaster Professional Chronograph remains as popular today as ever.

Though the Speedmaster was first launched in 1957, relatively few changes have been made to its design or its movement over the years. In fact, the highly robust case design, totally functional dial and unbeatably reliable movement were instrumental in helping the Speedmaster to become the only chronograph to pass the most stringent tests ever devised for a watch by NASA.

OMEGA Speedmaster Professional 35th Moon Landing Anniversary Edition

The special edition for the 35th anniversary of the moon landing distinguishes itself in its own original manner with a unique sapphire crystal case back on which the Apollo 11 mission patch is glazed in colour.

The case-back ring bears the special inscription “Apollo 11 35th anniversary Limited Edition” as well as the limited-edition number (0001/3500). The limited-edition status is also confirmed by a subtle inscription below the Omega Speedmaster Professional name on the dial, mentioning merely the date of the Apollo 11 landing “July 20, 1969” in red.

The 35th anniversary Speedmaster has a silver dial with applied hour markers with luminous dots and contrasting black counters for the continuous small seconds, 30-minute and 12-hour chronograph counters. It has the typical Speedmaster stainless-steel bezel with black aluminium ring bearing the tachymeter scale, rhodium-plated hands with SuperLuminova and stainless-steel bracelet with safety clasp.

The movement is the classic Omega hand-winding chronograph calibre 1861, which has a 45-hour power reserve. It is a direct descendant of the original 321 and 861 calibres used in the very first Speedmasters and as such shares the same reliability and resistance that helped its predecessors withstand temperature fluctuations of over 100°C, shocks of 40g, acceleration of 16g and vibrations of between 5 and 2000 Hz during the NASA tests.

This timepiece was produced in limited series of 3500, individually numbered, and bears the Apollo 11 insignia.

OMEGA Railmaster Chronograph 42.2mm

The original Omega Railmaster was first launched in 1957 as the successor to a watch created for the British Royal Air Force in 1953. It had a special anti-magnetic construction and was designed specifically for people who worked in or around powerful electric currents, such as railway workers – hence the name. Relaunched in 2003, the classic black dial of the Railmaster models have enjoyed considerable popularity.

Launched in 2004, the chronograph models have the classic Railmaster stainless-steel case design in a diameter of 42.2mm. It has a brushed finish with contrasting polished facets on the typical Seamaster lugs, a polished crown, polished oval pushers and a simple polished bevelled bezel. As with all Railmaster models, the dial is available exclusively in the same matt black as the original model and shares the same high-visibility luminous Arabic numerals at the four quarters and triangular hour markers as the other models in the collection.

OMEGA Railmaster Chronograph 42.2mm

In the chronograph, these are highlighted even further by facetted rhodium-plated hour, minute and central seconds hands with extra luminous SuperLuminova material. Chronograph counters for 30 minutes and 12 hours are situated at 3 o’clock and 6 o’clock respectively, with a continuous small seconds counter at 9 o’clock, all with rhodium-plated hands. The central chronograph seconds hand with luminous arrowhead pointer can be read off against a scale graduated to ¼ of a second.

The Railmaster Chronograph is powered by the Omega calibre 3205 self-winding chronometer-chronograph movement which has 55-hour power reserve, official chronometer certification and column-wheel mechanism.

The calibre 3205 is also fitted with Omega’s proprietary free sprung-balance without index, which avoids the disturbing effects of contact between the balance-spring and the index pins and therefore ensures stability of the watch’s going rate over long periods of use.

These classic chronographs naturally have the same high-quality standards as all Seamaster models, including a screw-in crown and case back that ensure water resistance to 150 metres and a domed, scratch-resistant sapphire crystal with anti-reflective treatment on the inside.

A choice of brushed stainless-steel bracelet and black or brown alligator leather straps with push button-operated stainless-steel fold-over clasps enables the exact look to be tailored to the wearer’s preference.

BLANCPAIN Villeret Chronographe Monopoussoir White Gold Version with Tobacco Brown Dial

Launched in 2004, this highly technical timepiece from the elegant Villeret collection is a mono pusher chronograph equipped with Blancpain M185 automatic movement. All the functions of this chronograph -starting, stopping, return to zero – are activated by the single push-piece housed in the crown at 3 o’clock. Crafted in 18 carat white gold, this Chronographe Monopoussoir model with tobacco brown dial is fitted with a matching hand-sewn, tobacco-brown crocodile leather strap.

BLANCPAIN Villeret Chronographe Monopoussoir White Gold Version with Tobacco Brown Dial

Technical details

Movement
Automatic, M185 calibre
37 rubies, 320 parts
40-hour power reserve

Functions
Hours, minutes, seconds, date, chronograph

Case
750 (18C) white gold
Sapphire crystal and back

Dial
Tobacco brown

Strap
Hand-sewn, tobacco-brown crocodile leather

Omega Constellation Double Eagle Chronometer

The name for this gents’ Constellation model comes from the world of golf. Though even non-golfers are familiar with the term “hole-in-one”, the double eagle is a much rarer shot in the game (three under par, also known as an albatross) and is therefore a highly exclusive name.

Despite its contemporary design, the Double Eagle retains the same familiar Constellation attributes: the trademark “claws” which envelop the case and bezel; the smooth lines of two crescent-shaped facets on the case (instead of lugs); and the Roman numerals I to XII stamped around the circumference of the bezel.

Omega Constellation Double Eagle Chronometer

The Double Eagle is available in brushed stainless steel and two-tone (stainless steel and yellow gold) versions with a 35mm or 38mm case diameter. The two-tone models have a stainless-steel case and bracelet, a bezel in brushed 18-carat yellow gold, polished 18-carat yellow gold claws and polished 18-carat yellow gold central linking bars on the bracelet.

 Omega Constellation Double Eagle Chronometer

On the all-steel versions, polished stainless-steel claws and linking bars on the bracelet contrast with the soft, brushed finish of the case, bezel and bracelet. Silvered or light champagne dials are available, with a black dial available exclusively on the all-steel model. A luxurious model is also available in the 35mm case size in 18-carat satin-finished red gold with an ivory dial and matching satin-finished 18-carat red gold bracelet.

The Constellation Double Eagle is fitted with the Omega calibre 2500 Co-Axial Escapement movement, the design of which generates less friction and therefore offers better long-term accuracy in comparison with the Swiss lever escapement. This unique movement has been certified as a chronometer by the official Swiss chronometer testing institute (COSC) and its exclusive rhodium-plated finish with circular graining and Geneva wave decoration is visible behind a transparent sapphire crystal case back.

The Omega calibre 2500 displays the hours, minutes, central seconds and date and has a power reserve of 44 hours. The Constellation Double Eagle is also available with the Omega calibre 1680 thermo compensated precision quartz movement, which has a battery lifetime of 60 months and a perpetual calendar function that is programmed until 2100.

The case back of the quartz models bears the familiar observatory emblem, recalling the Constellation’s numerous world precision records over the history of such competitions, which were held in Europe’s foremost observatories.

This gents’ Constellation model naturally benefits from the same high levels of quality inherent in every Omega watch, including water resistance to 100 metres and the protection offered by a scratch-resistant sapphire crystal.

OMEGA Olympic Collection Edition 2004 – Chronograph London 1948, Speedmaster Date Los Angeles 1932, Speedmaster Broad Arrow Melbourne 1956 and De Ville Co-Axial Chronograph Rome 1960

In 2004, to celebrate a century of achievement in sports timekeeping, OMEGA launched the Olympic collection that comprised of four chronographs with a distinctive Olympic-related theme. The timepieces were:-

  • OMEGA Chronograph, London 1948
  • OMEGA Speedmaster Date, Los Angeles 1932
  • OMEGA Speedmaster Broad Arrow, Melbourne 1956
  • OMEGA De Ville Co-Axial Chronograph, Rome 1960

The chronographs of the OMEGA Olympic collection recall the very beginnings of the brand’s timekeeping exploits with a design that harks back to the first chronographs used at the Olympic Games produced by the brand in the 1930s and used at the 1932 Los Angeles Games.

The collection sees reproductions of the original dials of these models – complete with the period red OMEGA name and symbol – incorporated into chronographs from the current OMEGA collection. The case back of each model is engraved with the five Olympic rings.

OMEGA Seamaster Chronograph, London 1948
The Seamaster chronograph of the Omega Olympic Collection superimposes white Arabic numerals and red chronograph counters against a black dial – all protected by a scratch-resistant sapphire crystal. Its divers’ watch status is underscored by the robust case, the unidirectional rotating stainless-steel bezel, patented OMEGA helium escape valve and water resistance to 300m guaranteed by a screw-in crown with O-ring gasket and decompression ring, screw-in pushers and a screw-in case back.

OMEGA Seamaster Chronograph, London 1948

The sporty look of this chronograph, which is completed by a tough, water-resistant rubber strap, belies the high-end technology inside. The Seamaster Chronograph of the Omega Olympic Collection uses the exclusive OMEGA calibre 3303 movement. This self-winding OMEGA chronograph movement is a certified chronometer and uses a column-wheel chronograph mechanism.

OMEGA Speedmaster Date, Los Angeles 1932
The Speedmaster Date of the Omega Olympic Collection has red chronograph hands and blued-steel hour, minute and small seconds hands. Available exclusively with a matching stainless-steel bracelet, it retains the typical Speedmaster feature of a tachometer scale engraved on the stainless steel bezel and has a scratch-resistant sapphire crystal.

OMEGA Speedmaster Date, Los Angeles 1932

This chronograph is powered by the OMEGA calibre 1152 self-winding chronograph movement, which has an exclusive rhodium-plated finish and a power reserve of 44 hours. The Speedmaster Date of the Omega Olympic Collection is water resistant to 30 metres.

OMEGA Speedmaster Broad Arrow, Melbourne 1956
The design of the Speedmaster Broad Arrow of the Omega Olympic Collection marries the red chronograph hands and the red OMEGA symbol and name with a black dial – the traditional Speedmaster dial colour, reminiscent of that of the legendary Speedmaster Professional “Moon Watch”.

OMEGA Speedmaster Broad Arrow, Melbourne 1956

Incorporating the striking “broad arrow” hands found on the very first Speedmaster models, the Speedmaster Broad Arrow of the Omega Olympic Collection uses OMEGA’s high-end column-wheel chronograph movement, OMEGA calibre 3303. This exclusive OMEGA movement has a 55-hour power reserve, stop-seconds function and uses the OMEGA free sprung-balance to offer better regulating stability. The Speedmaster Broad Arrow of the Omega Olympic Collection is water resistant to 100 metres and is available exclusively with a matching stainless steel bracelet.

OMEGA De Ville Co-Axial Chronograph, Rome 1960
The model of the De Ville Co-Axial Chronograph of the Omega Olympic Collection has a sober white dial which is elegantly set off by the theme of the Olympic Games. The De Ville Co-Axial collection represents the fine art of watchmaking in all respects. Its case design recalls the popular OMEGA models of the fifties and all models feature the revolutionary OMEGA Co-Axial Escapement, which offers better long-term accuracy.

OMEGA De Ville Co-Axial Chronograph, Rome 1960

The De Ville Co-Axial Chronograph of the Omega Olympic Collection is powered by OMEGA calibre 3313, a self-winding chronograph movement with official chronometer certification and a 55-hour power reserve. It is fitted with a brown alligator leather strap and stainless-steel foldover clasp.

Omega Ladies’ Speedmaster, Edition 2004

Derived from the legendary Omega Speedmaster Professional, the only watch to be worn on the Moon, the ladies’ Speedmaster has an excellent pedigree and offers a perfect combination of mechanical watchmaking art and fashionable chic.

The feminine appeal of the ladies’ Speedmaster is achieved by reducing the case size to 35.5mm and replacing some of the Professional model’s masculine traits with more emotional, feminine touches.

Thus the sober matt black dial and trademark tachymeter scale on the bezel of the gents’ model are exchanged for the luxury of mother-of-pearl on the dial of the ladies’ model, with the sparkle of 49 diamonds around the bezel. Coloured Arabic numerals also help to establish a clearly unique identity for the ladies’ Speedmaster models.

Omega Ladies' Speedmaster, Edition 2004

The models are available with a black or white mother-of-pearl dial, each with a choice of rectangular hour markers set with 30 diamonds or Arabic numerals in white, grey, blue or red. The hour, minute and chronograph hands are the same luminous baton hands as those found on the original Speedmaster, as is the Hesalite crystal.

The stainless-steel bracelet with a striated central section adds a further distinctive touch to these models, with the undoubted star in the collection being the model with red Arabic numerals on a white mother-of-pearl dial with a matching red alligator leather strap and stainless-steel foldover clasp.

Omega Ladies' Speedmaster, Edition 2004

The heart that beats inside these models is the Omega calibre 3220 self-winding chronograph calibre. With 47 synthetic rubies as bearings, it has almost as many jewels inside the movement as there are on the watch’s bezel and its luxurious finish of special waves, circular graining and gold-plated engravings is the perfect inner reflection of the watch’s exterior beauty. The Omega calibre 3220 also has a high-performance winding system that ensures a power reserve of 40 hours.

PATEK PHILIPPE Gondolo Calendario

Launched in 2004, the Gondolo Calendario features an Annual Date equipped with three windows. The art-deco inspired yellow gold case houses 324 calibre, boasting numerous technical refinements and setting new heights in terms of precision and reliability.

The silvered opaline, two-tone dial boasts appliqué hour markers and hands in yellow gold. A sub dial at 6’o clock displays 24-hour indication and moon phase. The 18 carat yellow gold case is equipped with screw-down crown and screw-down sapphire back.

PATEK PHILIPPE Gondolo Calendario

Technical details

Movement
Automatic, calibre 324
28,800 V/h, Poinçon de Genève

Functions
Hours, minutes, seconds, annual date,
24-hour display, moon phase

Case
750 (18C) yellow gold
Screw-down crown
Screw-down sapphire back

Dial
Silvered opaline, two-tone:recessed, azure centre, sunray outside
Appliqué hour markers and hands in yellow gold
Ancillary dial at 6 o’clock: 24-hour counter and moon phase

Strap
Alligator, pronged clasp in yellow gold

Other versions
White gold, silvered or slate-grey dial

ALPINA Startimer Automatic, Stainless Steel Case, Black Enamel Dial

Introduced in 2004, this model from Alpina’s Startimer comes in a stylistic stainless steel case and features an elegant black enamel dial. Equipped with AL-550-1 automatic movement, this timepiece offers date, GMT, 24 hour day/night and 60 min indicators.  The additional crown at 10 o’clock operates the two internal rotating bezels.

The 42 mm stainless steel case, which is fitted with convex crystal and sapphire screw-down back, has a water resistance up to 100 meters. The black enamelled dial features Arabic numerals, luminescent hands, date at 6 o’clock, and 4th hand for second time zone.

ALPINA Startimer Automatic watch, Stainless Steel Case, Black Enamel Dial

Technical details

Movement
Automatic AL-550 -1
28,800 V/h, 27 rubies
Côtes de Genève patterning
42-hour power reserve

Functions
Hours, minutes, seconds, date, GMT, 24 hour day/night and 60 min indicators

Case
Steel, 42 mm
Convex crystal and sapphire screw-down back
Individually numbered
Water-resistant to 100 m

Dial
Black enamelled
Date at 6 o’clock, 4th hand for a second time zone
Arabic numerals, luminescent hands

Bracelet/Strap
Steel
Other versions: Hand-sewn black or brown leather bracelet

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OMEGA De Ville Byzantium

Introduced in 2004, the OMEGA De Ville Byzantium with its striking square case design pays tribute to the city of Istanbul, whose historical name was Byzantium until AD 330 and after that it was renamed  Constantinople and made the capital of Roman Empire.  Since 1930, the city is known as Istanbul.

The OMEGA De Ville Byzantium takes inspiration from a city that has through the ages been the meeting point of East and West: today’s Istanbul, yesterday’s Constantinople and history’s Byzantium.

OMEGA De Ville Byzantium

Incorporating oversized or multicoloured numbers on its striking dial, the Omega’s De Ville Byzantium, the only gents’ watch in the standard international collection from the brand to have a square case, features an elegant vintage design which recalls the brand’s first full calendar complication watch, the Cosmic, dating from 1948.

OMEGA De Ville Byzantium

A closer look to the standard black dial reveals an intriguing combination of Roman and Arabic numerals. A fusion of East and West as well as a successful marriage of classic and modern characteristics, this configuration gives the dial a hitherto unattained symmetry. The time is indicated by the same classic diamond-polished and facetted Alpha hands found on Omega’s high-end De Ville Co-Axial models, which have luminous Super Luminova inserts for superb low-light and night-time legibility.

The watch’s square case in stainless-steel measures 33.4 mm by 33.4 mm and has a case back fixed with screws that helps guarantee water resistance to 50 metres / 167 feet. The most distinctive touch is undoubtedly provided by the facetted triangular lugs with contrasting brushed and polished faces, which also serve an important function as the attachments for the black alligator leather strap with stainless-steel foldover clasp.

A plain polished stainless-steel bezel is the perfect complement to the uncluttered dial, with a domed scratch-resistant sapphire crystal with anti-reflective treatment on the inside completing the high-quality aspect of this timepiece. The De Ville medallion stamped on to the case back depicts the god of Time, Chronos, and recalls the long line of prestige timepieces in the De Ville collection, which is over 30 years old.

The OMEGA De Ville Byzantium is equipped with the Omega calibre 2500 Co-Axial Escapement calibre, an exceptional self-winding movement which combines Omega’s proprietary Co-Axial Escapement technology with the Omega free sprung-balance without index to offer improved long-term accuracy and reliability.

This unique movement – which has a luxurious rhodium-plated finish with Geneva wave décor, circular graining and gold-plated engravings – offers a power reserve of 48 hours and has official chronometer certification from the Swiss Chronometer Testing Institute (COSC).

Furthermore, Omega also produced a stunning jewellery version of the De Ville Byzantium in stainless steel with a white mother-of-pearl dial, Roman and Arabic numerals set with a total of 109 diamonds, a ruby cabochon set on the crown and a claret alligator leather strap.