L’Epée 1839 Ovale Tourbillon Four Quarters Engraved, 180th Anniversary Unique Piece

To mark their 180th anniversary, L’Epée 1839 Manufacture created a traditional clock, a one-off piece, in honor of its heritage as a great manufacturer of officers’ carriage clocks. As well as a central hours and minutes display, this clock from the Ovale collection possesses numerous complications: tourbillon, moon phase, alarm, calendar (Day and Month), and even strikes the quarter-hours.

To further enhance this exceptional piece, L’Epée 1839 commissioned the hand-engraving of the entire case. Two types of engraving (in positive and negative relief) are combined to form an abstract pattern that decorates the whole case with style.

This unique piece displays the hours and minutes on a white enamel dial. The two hands reproduce the shapes historically used for officers’ carriage clocks. The moon phase display, at six o’clock, presents the lunar cycles. The day and month displays and the alarm function are located on the lower part of the case front.

The ringing of the alarm is controlled by a dedicated barrel enabling the alarm to be regulated as desired. It produces its own characteristic, powerful tone.

The tourbillon crowned with swords can be admired through a glass window revealing the impressive width of the balance wheel and its characteristic rhythm of 2.5 Hz, or 18,000 vibrations per hour.

The clock has a power reserve of 8 days, and is endowed with the special feature of striking the quarter-hours. The double gong (with independent spring barrel) strikes the hours with one gong stroke, the first quarter with a double stroke, the half hour with two double strokes and the last quarter with three double strokes.

An on/off selector is located on the top of the clock, so that the strikes can be silenced as desired. A single key is used to set the time and wind the spring barrels, which are accessed by opening the glass door in the back of the clock.

The Ovale Tourbillon Four Quarters is a unique gilded piece made up of 433 parts, supplied in a traditional leather case with a window, as was usual for the era, enabling the time to be read while traveling.

Technical details

Model: Ovale Tourbillon Four Quarters Engraved
Reference 64.6143/901
Limited edition: Single unique piece

Total components: 433 parts
Weight: 2.9 kg
Dimensions: H 14cm/L12.9cm/W10.8 cm

Functions
Hour/Minute
Alarm
Day/Month
Moon phase
Tourbillon
Striking mechanism: hour (1 stroke/1 o’clock; 4 o’clock = 4 strokes), quarter hour (double stroke), half hour (double stroke x2) last quarter (double stroke x3)
Striking mechanism: On/off

Movement
L’Epée 1839 movement with complications
Components: 299 parts for the movement and 77 for the tourbillon
Jewels: 15
Escapement: 18,000 vph
Caliber: Cal. 1881T
Power reserve: 8 days
Materials: Gilded brass
Dial
White enamel
The time is set and the movement is wound using the key typical of L’Epée 1839 officers’ carriage clocks.

Casing

Pivoting rear door
Components: 49 parts
Materials: Gilded brass (thickness 3 microns) and mineral glass
Finishes: Polished, satin-brushed and sand-blasted
Hand-engraved by an artist over the entire case

TIME FAST D8 by L’Epée 1839, ECAL and Georg Foster

This vintage-inspired race car and a modern clock in one is a kinetic sculpture that tells the time. It was designed by Georg Foster, a promising young newcomer and major contributor to this second collaboration between ECAL (Ecole cantonale d’art de Lausanne) and the Swiss manufacture.

The piece features a number of eye-catching details, such as the long protruding engine hood, the typical 1950s radiator grill, the large spoked wheels, the driving seat positioned to the rear and the sloping back section. Its overall sporty feel is reinforced by its elegant design, flawless finishes and fluid lines.

The name of the Time Fast D8 clearly conveys its technical aspirations, incorporating a motor that can last 8 days or rather an in-house caliber with a 192-hour power reserve beating at 18,000 vibrations per hour.

This kinetic sculpture displays the hours and minutes like a race number, allowing the time to be easily read on the side of the chassis.

A figure sits in the cockpit, where a glass dome, or rather a driver’s helmet, highlights the thrumming escapement. In front of him is the steering wheel, which adopts the three-spoke design typically seen in race cars, serving to set the time.


Meanwhile, in a subtle nod to childhood memories, the mechanical motor is wound just like a pull-back car. With 289 ultra-precise mechanical components finished with the greatest care, Time Fast promises its owner nothing but pure pleasure and sensations. Measuring 38 cm long, 16 cm wide and 12 high and weighing just 4.7 kg, this race car is by no means lacking in stature and could easily have come straight from one of the greatest motorsports stables.

Time Fast D8 is a limited edition: 100 pieces per body color, initially produced in Grey, Red, Blue, Green, Blue with white stripes and White with blue stripes versions.

Design & Inspiration

For all generations, classic 50s cars are firmly ingrained in the collective subconscious and imagination. Single-seaters boasting a sleek design, fluid lines and assertive aerodynamics, they fuel many a dream.

Time Fast, which was designed by Georg Foster while he was a master’s student at ECAL, draws inspiration from a dream of becoming a race driver, or simply the desire to experience the thrills of speed. To create this realistically proportioned mechanical sculpture, he drew on his childhood memories to add symbols and representations, such as boards, bodywork and steering wheels.

A fan of motorsport, Georg remembers the typical sound of the smoldering engines and the metallic clicking that follows a mad race, almost echoing the tick-tock of Time Fast D8’s escapement.

The shaping and production were entirely entrusted to the manufacture’s passionate teams, predominantly comprised of automotive enthusiasts. With the exception of the raw aluminum casting, the crystals and the jewels, which are sourced from elsewhere, every piece has passed through the hands of the twenty or so experts within the L’Epée 1839 workshops.

Automotive and horological functions

In motor racing, it’s well known that although the driver is the only one to be first over the finish line, his entire team helps to make this victory possible by achieving the impossible. What applies to the track also applies to life as a whole. The teams of designers, engineers and watchmakers therefore embraced the challenge of producing an exceptional and unique clock incorporating all the elements of a race car. Every detail has been carefully considered to intimately interlink form and function to spark a renewed fascination for kinetic sculptures.

The engine consists of a tiered movement with an 8-day power reserve that was entirely developed to hug the curves of the bodywork.

The hours and minutes are displayed on the side through an aperture resembling a typical competition number, via two engraved stainless steel disks. On the other side of the chassis is the advertising spot, the characteristic circle on iconic race cars, which can be optionally customized to create a personalized car, by means of an engraving, for example (the L’Epée 1839 logo comes as standard).

In the cockpit, the car’s steering wheel, which has been specially designed to incorporate the time-setting wheel, can be used to adjust the time if the engine ever breaks down. Located in the driver’s seat, a counterclockwise adjustment adjusts the time, while clockwise adjustment can be used to reposition the steering wheel once the correct time is set.

Time Fast D8 needs to be filled up (with mechanical energy) once every week. The mechanical movement’s barrel is wound by moving the wheels in reverse to provide the car with the power it requires to remain fully functional. Meanwhile drive mode is simply designed to provide unimpeded delight.

The car’s structure

Just like a normal-sized car, Time Fast D8 is formed of solid aluminum body parts, as well as components as small as an escapement wheel (measuring just a few millimeters across). But here, each part is individually and impeccably finished, whether decorated, polished, satin finished or sand-blasted by hand.

L’Epée 1839 presents an interpretation of the car where the human being, symbolized by the escapement, is placed at the heart of the car. Safely installed and protected by a glass dome (the helmet), it sets the pace, just like a driver regulating the power of the engine.

The movement’s plates form the chassis. Each has been designed with great attention to detail, symbolizing for instance the engine block of old race cars. As if to cool the motor constantly running at 18,000 vibrations per hour, the radiator grill is openworked to reveal the manufacturer’s emblem. A dual exhaust provides one final nod to the automotive world.

Particular attention has been paid to the four wheels, whose spoked rims are wrapped in soft rubber for greater grip, providing excellent transmission of power during winding.

Technical details

Model: TIME FAST D8
Limited edition: 100 pieces per color

References
74.6004/184: White with blue stripes
74.6004/114: Grey
74.6004/134: Green
74.6004/144: Blue
74.6004/164: Red
74.6004/194: Blue with white stripes

Functions
Hour and minute display
Time set via counterclockwise rotation of the steering wheel
A clockwise rotation serves to reposition the steering wheel as desired.
The clock is wound using the rear wheels:
Reverse the car to fill it up i.e. wind the barrel, supplying the clock mechanism with energy.
The car can move freely forwards.

Engine
Tiered mechanical movement, L’Epée 1839 1855 MHD in-house caliber
Escapement: 18,000 vib/hour
26 jewels
Power reserve: 8 days
Materials: nickel- and palladium-plated brass, polished stainless steel, colored with the use of automotive lacquers.
Incabloc protection system

Bodywork and wheels
Blown glass dome, machined and polished to simulate the driver’s helmet
Front and rear bodywork in aluminum
Automotive painting
Spoked rims in stainless steel
Tires in hard-wearing rubber

Finishes
Polished and sand-blasted movement (plates and wheels) / Satin-finished struts (stringers) / Polished and satin-finished rims / Painted bodywork

Other specifications
Number of components: total of 289 parts
Weight: 4.7 kg
Dimensions: 38.5 cm long x 16 cm wide x 12 cm high

L’Epée 1839 Space Module: The Mechanical Weather Station with Hygrometer, Thermometer and Barometer

The year 2019 marks a milestone in the history of space exploration: it is 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 expedition that brought about Man’s first steps on the moon. It is also a landmark year for L’Epée 1839, which is celebrating the 180th anniversary of its watchmaking art manufacture. So, the brand created the Space Module, a Swiss-made weather instrument whose design is inspired by the first lunar modules from the 1960s.

The barometer—an essential indicator of good or bad weather—measures atmospheric pressure. Meanwhile the hygrometer measures the percentage of humidity in the air. Lastly, the thermometer indicates the temperature of the environment. The three mechanical and modular instruments are placed one on top of the other on a stable base adorned with finishes and decoration inspired by the tools used for space exploration.

This mechanical weather station device was created by Martin Bolo, a promising young designer. He drew his inspiration from the tiered structure of lunar modules and the unmistakable shape of cylinder landing gear.

Space Module weighs 3.8 kg (8.4 lbs). Its diameter of 25 cm/9.8 in and height of 21 cm/8.3 in (for the most complete version) give it a balanced stature that enables it to go almost anywhere.

Space Module is a limited edition of 50 pieces, available in gilded and silver-colored versions.

Design

The module’s overall architecture draws on the construction and engineering conventions used for the various different modules designed for lunar missions, which notably include the independent tiered system. The symmetry of its silhouette and the various design elements immerse the viewer into the brand’s beloved world of exploration and innovation.

Housed between the three feet under the base are a number of details: a decorative satellite dish, an anemometer to measure the wind wherean atmosphere is present, three propulsion engines for returning to base and, of course, a flag, the ultimate symbol of conquest.

For 180 years, the leitmotif of L’Epée 1839 creations has been Dare to be different, which this year has led the brand to deliberately not include a watch movement in this new piece.

Mechanical Weather Station

The Space Module weather station presents three functions: hygrometer, thermometer and barometer. It is entirely mechanical, with no electrical components to disturb the machine’s smooth operation in any environment. There is just a single calibration screw provided for each instrument to guarantee the tool’s accuracy.

The decision to use only mechanical instruments reflects the brand’s long history and its conscious desire to create objects that stand the test of time. And here it also incorporates a more far-reaching idea: in all distant exploration, energy, sustainability and environmental impact are the main keys to success. A 100% mechanical module therefore increases the lifespan of a module, removing the constraints of the sun’s position and battery issues.

Space Module operates best in an Earth-like atmosphere. Although Earth is not the only planet with an inhabitable atmosphere, the device is currently only able to display a data range similar to the conditions on planet Earth. So the barometer indicates between 980 and 1040 Hpa: the higher the value indicated by the hand, the better the weather. The hygrometer indicates the percentage of humidity in the air—from 0 to 100%—while the temperature ranges from -10 to +50°C. All of this data is shown on a dual scale in inches of mercury and Fahrenheit.

The data is indicated by means of the red hand, which is finely laser-cut to represent an intergalactic spaceship flying at full throttle. Meanwhile the three dials are made from stainless steel with a satin-brushed and polished finish.

Modular system & Construction

L’Epée 1839 has chosen to use a modular structure. The three independent tiers can be installed on the base in a staggered fashion by means of a secure system of bayonets with magnetic bolts. Each module operates entirely autonomously.

The construction constraints of exploratory devices have also been implemented here, with engineers having to meet the sizable challenge of reducing the mass as much as possible without sacrificing any technical or aesthetic aspects. This led them to use lightweight materials such as aluminum.

Two versions of Space Module have been created. One is comprised of a set of gilded pieces—dial, base and stand—while on the second version, these elements are palladium-plated. The addition of black anodized components (the legs and fastening rings) enhances the decoration and the finishes, which include polishing, sand-blasting, satin-brushing and engraving.

Technical details

Space Module

Limited Edition: 50 pieces per color
Dimensions: Ø257 x 221 mm
Weight: 3.8 kg
169 components

3x Weather instruments
-140 mm x 35 mm dodecagon [H and T] / 140 mm x 57 mm dodecagon [B]
– Stainless steel dial
– Black elox aluminum / laser-engraved back
– Display with curved hand painted red [spaceship shaped]
– Calibration bolt accessible from the back
– Rings can be attached to each other or the base using three bayonets with magnetic bolts
– Weight: approx 3 x 0.8 kg

Barometer
• DOUBLE diaphragm aneroid
• Dual display
• 980 to 1040 Hpa [ 29 to 30.7 inHg]

Thermometer
• Thermometer with bimetallic strip spiral spring
• Dual display
• -10 to +50° Celsius [15 to 120° Fahrenheit]

Hygrometer
• Hygrometer with metal spiral spring
• 0 – 100%

+ 1 Base
– Base in laser-engraved anodized aluminum
– Black anodized aluminum leg / Diamond-polished brass foot [Palladium or Gold]
– Multiple decorative imitation scientific instruments
Three propulsion engines: stainless steel nozzles
Satellite dish
Anemometer
“L’EPEE 1839” flag in black PVD

+ Glass dome
– Bezel in black anodized aluminum
– Dome in blown glass
-Can be affixed no matter the weather instrument: completely modular

L’Epée 1839 Time Machine

With a futuristic design inspired by the film world, and a subtle nod to the mechanics of yesteryear, the Time Machine by L’Epée 1839 is nothing less than a mechanical sculpture that tells the time. The entire upper part revolves. A single press sets the entire time capsule – the glass tube, the carriage, the time display, and the whole mechanical movement – rotating and transporting you through time.

The two propellers at either end of the carriage are also mobile: the first winds the movement, while the second adjusts the time.

The time capsule, powered by all these rotations, rests on a stable and immobile tripod that ensures total stability for safe take-offs and landings. A wing-nut system at the center of the clock locks the rotation of the capsule and stabilizes the precious mechanism during the journey.

With its 370 components, the Time Machine is a complex table clock measuring 22 cm high and 26 cm wide. It includes a mechanical L’Epée 1839 caliber featuring an 8-day power reserve. As with any dream machine, the onlooker immediately seeks to understand how it works: the motor is therefore visible in its entirety, providing a clear view of the mechanics and their timekeeping.

The Time Machine is produced in three limited editions of 50 pieces each: silvered, black and silvered, and black and gold.

Inspired by the most famous time machines and created with meticulous attention to detail, the Time Machine is the combined result of three minds from very different backgrounds: engineer and creator Nicolas Bringuet, designer Martin Bolo, and artistic director and general manager of L’Epée 1839, Arnaud Nicolas. Together they have created a mobile and truly dynamic scientific instrument that offers some subtle nods to the worlds of industry and cinema, while shining a light on mechanical clockmaking.

Each element of the Time Machine has been conceived and designed to evoke a memory. The capsule consists of a glass tube with a propeller at each end, symbolizing movement, the vortex, and science. The technically indispensable part required to lock the tube’s rotation is inspired by the very first machine featured in the film “The Time Machine”. Finally, the tripod reflects the temporal convector of one of the most famous American cars of the 1980s, the DeLorean. Every detail is significant.

The dynamic thrust of the object is omnipresent throughout this project, since no journey through time can be made without space. L’Epée 1839 thus set out to create a mobile clock. The first striking feature is the 360-degree rotation of the time capsule and the entire gear train of the watchmaking movement visible within it. Every rotating device also needs a locking system: and this one has been designed as a wing-nut that is turned to block the rotation, thus making the owner the key player in its usage.

The Time Machine displays the hour and minutes by means of two black metal cylinders inside a glass cylinder (the time capsule) which is framed by a propeller at each end. Each cylinder is machined and decorated by hand. The numbers, notably, are manually filled with white lacquer for maximum visibility. The time sequence and reading is made possible by a central indicator placed between the hour and minute cylinder.

The propellers are not simply a significant secondary design element, they are the two key elements of the timekeeping mechanism. The left propeller sets the time, while the right winds the barrel. These two propellers enable the owner to adjust their machine, and thus control their journey through time.

Of course, the time capsule containing the caliber 1855 (also present in the Destination Moon), is protected by a cylindrical glass so that no particle can change the future, the past, and the present… making this a true time machine.

We can all picture images of flying contraptions allowing us to travel through time, complete with their bumpy landings. L’Epée 1839 has therefore deliberately created a stationary tripod for stability on all surfaces, whether a runway or a simple desk, while incorporating slight flexibility in the foot.

Although accustomed to exceptional handmade finishes, the experienced observer will note the multiple alternations of polished and satin-finished edges, thus creating marked angles and accentuating the interplay of light and reflections. This detail highlights the work of expert hands and the undeniable know-how of the teams at the L’Epée 1839 clock manufacture.

The twin ends of the capsule also required a time-consuming process of hand-finishing and polishing, both on the curved surfaces and the propellers themselves. The end result creates a visually absorbing mirror effect that both mesmerizes and showcases the chamfering work on the components.

Technical details

Model: Time Machine

Limited series: 50 pieces per configuration
Dimensions: 25.7 x 22 x 21 centimeters
Weight: 5.2 kg
Number of components: 370

Functions
Hour and minute display in the center of the tube via two black laser-engraved PVD stainless steel cylinders
Winding and time-setting carried out via the propellers on either end of the tube.
360° tube rotation

L’Epee 1839 Movement
Horizontal L’Epée 1839 movement designed and manufactured in-house
Caliber 1855 – Vertical escapement
Balance wheel frequency: 18,000 A/h / 2.5 Hz
Single barrel
Power reserve: 8 days
Number of jewels: 17
Number of components: 162
Incabloc protection system
Time-setting via the left propeller, by turning clockwise with the H/M display facing you
Winding via the right propeller
Materials: brass and stainless steel, base plate: nickel or black PVD, gear train palladium or gold plated

The Machine
208 components
Materials: brass and stainless steel
Finishes including polishing, sandblasting, satin finishing.

The capsule
Mineral glass crystal
Two propellers at each end. Produced by bar turning and waterjet cutting
Materials: palladium brass and PVD depending on the versions.

Base structure
Fixed tripod in brass and stainless steel (palladium, gold or black PVD depending on the version)
Stainless steel (fixed) cylinders
Capsule rotation locked by means of a nut system.

References
74.6001/114: steel
74.6001/204: black and gold
74.6001/214: black and steel

L’Epée 1839 Ovale Tourbillon Four Quarters Engraved

To mark their 180th anniversary in 2019, the L’Epée 1839 Manufacture created a traditional clock, a one-off piece, in honor of its heritage as a great manufacturer of officers’ carriage clocks. As well as a central hours and minutes display, this clock from the Ovale collection possesses numerous complications: tourbillon, moon phase, alarm, calendar (Day and Month), and even strikes the quarter-hours.

To further enhance this exceptional piece, L’Epée1839 commissioned the hand-engraving of the entire case. Two types of engraving (in positive and negative relief) are combined to form an abstract pattern that decorates the whole case with style.

This unique piece displays the hours and minutes on a white enamel dial. The two hands reproduce the shapes historically used for officers’ carriage clocks. The moon phase display, at six o’clock, presents the lunar cycles. The day and month displays and the alarm function are located on the lower part of the case front.

The ringing of the alarm is controlled by a dedicated barrel enabling the alarm to be regulated as desired. It produces its own characteristic, powerful tone.

The tourbillon crowned with swords can be admired through a glass window revealing the impressive width of the balance wheel and its characteristic rhythm of 2.5 Hz, or 18,000 vibrations per hour.

The clock has a power reserve of 8 days, and is endowed with the special feature of striking the quarter-hours. The double gong (with independent spring barrel) strikes the hours with one gong stroke, the first quarter with a double stroke, the half hour with two double strokes and the last quarter with three double strokes. An on/off selector is located on the top of the clock, so that the strikes can be silenced as desired. A single key is used to set the time and wind the spring barrels, which are accessed by opening the glass door in the back of the clock.

The Ovale Tourbillon Four Quarters is a unique gilded piece made up of 433 parts, supplied in a traditional leather case with a window, as was usual for the era, enabling the time to be read while traveling. History relates that the officer’s clock was so named because Napoleon, the supreme commander of the armies, required his generals to carry a clock on all battlefields after suffering a defeat caused by the late arrival of some of his troops.

For nearly two centuries, L’Epée 1839 has been creating mechanical clocks, many of which have been given as gifts to the great names of this world. Many well-known personalities have given and/or received the gift of an officer’s carriage clock made by L’Epée 1839.

Technical details

Model: Ovale Tourbillon Four Quarters Engraved
Reference: 64.6143/901
Limited edition: Single unique piece

Functions
Hour/Minute
Alarm
Day/Month
Moon phase
Tourbillon
Striking mechanism: hour (1 stroke/1 o’clock; 4 o’clock = 4 strokes), quarter hour (double stroke), half hour (double stroke x2) last quarter (double stroke x3)
Striking mechanism: On/off

Movement
L’Epée 1839 movement with complications
Components: 299 parts for the movement and 77 for the tourbillon
Jewels: 15
Escapement: 18,000 vph
Caliber: Cal. 1881T
Power reserve: 8 days
Materials: Gilded brass
Key: The time is set and the movement is wound using the key typical of L’Epée 1839 officers’ carriage clocks.

Dial
White enamel

Casing
Pivoting rear door
Components: 49 parts
Materials: Gilded brass (thickness 3 microns) and mineral glass
Finishes: Polished, satin-brushed and sand-blasted
Hand-engraved by an artist over the entire case

Other specifications
Total components: 433 parts
Weight: 2.9 kg
Dimensions: H: 14cm/L: 12.9cm/W:10.8 cm

MEDUSA by MB&F and L’EPEE 1839

Jointly created by MB&F and Switzerland’s premier clockmaker L’EPEE 1839, Medusa is a dual-configuration clock, housed in hand-blown Murano glass, that can be ceiling mounted or stood upon a desk. In the form of one of the most compelling yet mysterious creatures of the sea, Medusa blends exceptional artisanal skill with Swiss horological precision, and introduces new frontiers in both.

The central mass of Medusa is formed by a large transparent dome of hand-blown Murano glass that evokes the bell-shaped body of a mature jellyfish. Two rotating rings, one displaying the hours and the other displaying the minutes, are visible through the dome, and the time is read off a single fixed indicator that extends over the rings. Like a jellyfish glowing in the abyss, Medusa glows in the dark thanks to Super-LumiNova. A 2.5Hz (18,000vph) movement beats underneath the time indication, forming the pulsating heart of this mechanical creature.

The movement of Medusa is entirely new and required over two years of development by L’Epée 1839. Whereas the other co-creations had separate points of winding and setting, Medusa required a combined system for winding and setting, since the surrounding glass dome limits access to the movement. Furthermore, in order to maximise the visual impact of the clock and reinforce the source of its design inspiration, the movement was engineered around a central axis, mimicking the radial symmetry of a jellyfish’s neural column.

Perfecting the glass exterior of Medusa – available in blue, green or pink – was as challenging as any aspect of its movement creation. The pink edition, in particular, required multiple stages of layering red and clear glasses to achieve exactly the right shade desired.

For the best possible aesthetic result, the dome and tentacles had to be crafted from the same glass, which would give them the same optical qualities. The skill needed to produce by hand a set of consistent glass tentacles for each clock exists only in very few glassblowing houses. Add to this the difficulty of creating a hand-blown Murano glass dome that has to appear extremely light and delicate, and yet withstand the weight of a clock movement – it’s easy to see why only one Murano glassblower, out of the 40 companies that L’Epée 1839 approached, was able to accomplish the task.

Independent designer Fabrice Gonet first proposed Medusa in 2016 to MB&F founder Maximilian Büsser, who immediately saw the appeal of Gonet’s sketch and recognised the essential spirit of an MB&F creation in its lines.

Medusa comes in three limited editions of 50 pieces, each in a different colour – blue, green and pink – chosen to reflect the natural hues of a jellyfish.

Technical details

Display
Hours and minutes

Size
Dimensions:
Hanging position: 286 mm tall x 250 mm diameter
Standing position: 323 mm tall x 250 mm diameter
Components total: 231
Weight:approximately 6kg (the exact weight of the hand-blown glass dome varies)

Body/frame
Dome/tentacles: Murano hand-blown glass
Movement and standing base: stainless steel and brass
Indexes and top plate with Super-LumiNova

Engine
L’Epée suspended movement, designed and manufactured in-house
Balance frequency: 2.5 Hz / 18,000 bph
Power reserve: 7 days
Movement components: 155
Jewels: 23
Incabloc shock protection system
Movement finishing: Geneva waves, anglage, polishing, sandblasting, circular and vertical graining, satin finishing.
Integrated winding key to both set the time and wind the movement (propeller at the bottom of the movement).

Dual configuration
Ceiling-mounted: Medusa can be ceiling mounted thanks to the buckle located at the top of the movement. In this configuration the glass tentacles can be hung on the movement.
Standing: Medusa can stand on a table by way of a special metal base.

‘Grant’ by MB&F and L’Epée 1839

MB&F and L’Epée 1839 present Grant, a triple-tracked, Mad-Max-cross-Transformer robot clock on a mission.

Grant is a robot with a time display on his shield and a mission to slow things down when time runs too fast. There are no incessantly flashing digital numerals on Grant’s shield, no constantly spinning second hand. Grant transforms frantic chaos into relaxing hours and minutes.

While Grant’s time moves relatively slowly, he can travel quickly over rough terrain (or the messiest desk) on his three operational rubber tracks. Grant can also transform into one of three different modes: lying horizontally over his chassis for a low profile; crouching at 45 degrees; and sitting up 90 degrees. Grant’s time shield can always be set to a comfortable and optimal viewing angle.

Whatever the angle, Grant’s highly polished clockwork is on full display, and you can follow every click and turn of the gears. The mainspring barrel click near his ‘belly button’ is particularly mesmerizing in operation. The isochronal oscillations of the regulator keeping time in Grant’s glass-domed ‘brain’ are evidence of the clockwork’s high precision. Watching Grant “thinking” in real time is a stress-relieving activity in itself: Grant transforms time so that you can relax and enjoy it.

Grant’s 8-day, in-line manufacture movement features the same superlative fine finishing as found on the finest wristwatches: Geneva waves, anglage, polishing, sandblasting, plus circular and vertical satin finishing. Hand finishing a clock movement is significantly more challenging than that of a wristwatch due to the larger surface areas of the clock components.

Grant’s left arm holds a spinning disk, while his right arm clasps a removable grenade launcher. Grant even has a surprise up his sleeve: his grenade launcher is removable and doubles as the winding and time-setting key for his 8-day clockwork.

Grant is available in three limited editions of 50 pieces each in Nickel, Black, and Blue.

Technical details

Display
Hours and minutes

Size
Dimensions:
Truck: 115 mm tall x 212 mm wide x 231 mm long
Robot: 166 mm tall x 212 mm wide x 238 mm deep
Components total: 268
Weight: 2.34 kg

Body/frame
Transformer body with three operational tracks and three positions of clock/body.
Materials: stainless steel, nickel-plated brass, palladium-plated brass.
Dome/head: mineral glass.

Engine
L’Epée in-house designed and manufactured in-line eight-day movement
Balance frequency: 2.5 Hz / 18,000 bph
Power reserve: 8 days
Components movement: 155
Jewels: 11
Incabloc shock protection system

Movement finishing: Geneva waves, anglage, polishing, sandblasting, circular and vertical graining, satin finishing.

Winding: key on right hand doubles as weapon and pulls out to reveal a double-depth square socket key that both sets the time and winds the movement (on the back/dial side of the clock).

L’Épée 1839 Hot Balloon: The First Suspended Clock

The Hot Balloon, the mechanical clock in the form of a hot air balloon created by L’Épée 1839, follows the brand’s other co-creations – the Vanitas and Arachnophobia wall clocks. Placed simply on a table or suspended from the ceiling as if flying through the air, this kinetic sculpture symbolizes adventure and whimsy while remaining an exceptional mechanical timepiece.

An official partner of l’École cantonale d’art de Lausanne (ECAL), and specifically its Masters program in Advanced Studies in Design for Luxury and Craftsmanship, L’Épée 1839 created this clock on the theme of travel in collaboration with the talented design student Margo Clavier.

Inspired by the hot air balloon and all that it represents – adventure, imagination, discovery, ambition, freedom – Margo and L’Épée 1839 unveil a mechanical clock with impressive, sometimes floating presence which displays the hours and minutes for eight days.

An authentic piece of watchmaking art, Hot Balloon can also be admired from below, just as one might view a hot-air balloon overhead, as is the very first mechanical clock that can be hung from the ceiling.

The clock is set and wound in either position through an ingenious system that combines form and function, design and engineering, precision and durability. To set the time, simply turn the wheel-shaped crown located in place of the balloon’s burner blast valve. Winding the barrel is less intuitive and rather unexpected: the key is the balloon’s basket. Simply turn the basket to power the mechanism.

Full of poetry, Hot Balloon comprises 207 components; all produced in-house at the L’Épée 1839 manufacture, and finished and assembled by hand by a passionate team. The clock, sometimes placed on a table, sometimes suspended, measures 31 cm in height, and 17 cm in diameter.

Hot Balloon has been created in a limited edition of 50 pieces for each model: Palladium, Black and Palladium, Blue and Palladium, Red and Palladium, or Gold.

Technical Specifications

References
74.6002/004: Gold
74.6002/104: Palladium
74.6002/204: Black and Palladium
74.6002/404: Blue and Palladium
74.6002/504: Red and Palladium

Limited Series: 50 per configuration
Dimensions: Height 31 cm; Diameter (balloon) 17.2 cm; Height (basket) 8 cm
Weight: 3.9 kg
217 components

Functions
Desk clock and suspension clock
Time displayed on two stacked cylinders; flame-shaped indicator serving as hour and minute hands
Wound by the basket
Time setting via the button above the basket

Movement
L’Épée 1839 Movement, designed and manufactured in-house
1855 LR Caliber
Balance vibrations: 18,000 vph – 2.5 Hz
Single barrel
Power reserve: 8 days
Number of jewels: 17
Number of components: 207
Incabloc shock protection system
Palladium or gold plated mechanism, depending on model
Materials: brass and stainless steel

The Basket
The basket is an essential piece of the movement since it serves to wind the barrel.
Materials: brass and stainless steel
Finish comprised of polishing, sand-blasting and satin finishing.

The Balloon
Materials: brass and stainless steel
Finish comprised of polishing, sand-blasting, satin finishing and painting.
A system for ceiling suspension composed of a cable and a hook at the top of the balloon.

The Fifth Element by MB&F and L’Epée 1839

Fifth Element, the newest creation born from the partnership between MB&F and L’Epée 1839, incorporates an analogue weather station and a complex mechanical horological mechanism. This UFO styled desktop station houses four removable and interchangeable instrument elements: clock, barometer, hygrometer, and thermometer.

For the Fifth Element, premium Swiss mechanical clock manufacture L’Epée 1839 reengineered and skeletonised their 8-day clock movement to maximize transparency and visual access.

Remaining three elements are related for weather forecasting. The barometer, which measures air pressure, can predict changes in climate, as increasing air pressure foretells good clear weather, decreasing air pressure portends inclement weather. The hygrometer measures the percentage of water vapour in the air; it displays this as a percentage of the maximum amount of moisture that might be held at a given temperature. The Thermometer can alert us the variations in atmospheric temperatures.

There is a fifth element too! It is none other than Ross, the alien pilot, who rotates on cockpit styled manually-wound, air-regulated movement positioned below the mechanical clock

The pieces making up the complex framework of curves and circles composing the structure of the Fifth Element had to be milled from solid blocks of brass in a process taking many hours. Each of the four elements is composed of an outer case containing the core instrument of each module and can be placed on the Fifth Element structure. The clock had to be re-engineered for a vertical escapement on the side for visual access. The four elements – clock, barometer, hygrometer, and thermometer – are not only detachable and interchangeable; thanks to integrated support they can also stand.

In addition to the 8-day clock at the top of the Fifth Element, L’Epée created a second independent clockwork mechanism supported on bearings in the base and activated by a pushbutton. This powers the movement of Ross the alien pilot.

The clock movement was developed exclusively for this project by L’Epée, based on their superb in-house 8-day movement. The standard movement gear train is in-line i.e. all on the same plane; but for the Fifth Element, L’Epée rotated the regulator – consisting of the balance and escapement, the most complex mechanism in any clockwork regulator – a full 90 degrees to the movement. Because the Clock Element is mobile (it can be detached from the Fifth Element and stand alone, as can all the Elements),the regulator features an Incabloc shock protection system to minimise the risk of damage when the Clock Element is being moved or relocated. While shock protection is standard in wristwatch movements, it is more unusual in generally immobile clocks.

The Clock Element movement features the same types of superlative fine finishing found on the finest wristwatches, including Geneva waves, bevelling, polishing, sandblasting, and circular and vertical satin finishing.

The Fifth Element is available in 3 limited editions of 18 pieces each in Silver, Black, and Blue.

Technical details

Indications/functions
Clock (hours and minutes), barometer (air pressure), thermometer (air temperature), hygrometer (air humidity)

Complete Fifth Element
Dimensions: 376 mm in diameter x 209 mm in height
No. of components: 531
Base clockwork: no escapement, minute repeater-type governor
Materials: stainless steel, brass, bronze (alien)
Total weight: 15 kg

UFO Clock Movement
L’Epée in-house designed and manufactured, vertical architecture eight-day movement
Dimensions: 124 mm in diameter x 92 mm in height
Balance frequency: 2.5 Hz (18,000 bph)
Power reserve: 8 days from single barrel in base
Components in movement: 161
Jewels: 11
Incabloc shock protection system
Movement finishing: polishing, bead-blasting, and satin finishing
Weight: 1,35kg

UFO Barometer
Atmospheric pressure: 960 / 1060 hPa (28.4 / 31.6 in Hg)
Dimensions: 124 mm in diameter x 92 mm in height
Dial: laser engraved
Display: curved hand
Components: 73
Calibration screw-in base
Weight: 1.80 kg

UFO Thermometer
Temperature: -30° / +70° Celsius (-20° / +156°Fahrenheit)
Dimensions: 124 mm in diameter x 92 mm in height
Dial: laser engraved
Display: curved hand
Components: 46
Weight: 1.90 kg

UFO Hygrometer
Hygrometer: 0 – 100% humidity
Dimensions: 124 mm in diameter x 92 mm in height
Dial: laser engraved
Display: curved hand
Components: 46
Weight: 1.90 kg

L’Epée 1839 Gaz Derrick

L’Epée 1839, the iconic mechanical clock manufacturer based in Switzerland, presents Gaz Derrick, a new kinetic timepiece inspired by the industrial machinery used in natural gas extraction. This creation joins to the club of contemporary horology creations such as Starfleet Machine, Destination Moon and Octopod.

Equipped with new caliber that has been recently developed by the manufacturer, Gaz Derrick boasts of 2 dials in the shape and style of gas gauges; each displays the hour and minutes.

The winding and time-setting key is embedded on the clock. The time setting nod is the gaz burner located on top of the derrick symbolizing the possibility to overcome any unexpected problems. As no holes can be made close to a gaz field, a control-valve-shape winding key is located on the right side of the base allowing the owner to operate the release of energy.

Designed, developed and manufactured by L’Epée 1839 in the Jura (Switzerland), Gaz Derrick takes its inspiration from vast industrial landscapes that captured our imagination and turns that into a tangible, luxurious and meticulous interpretation.

Inspired by industrial gauges, hours and minutes are displayed on two distinct and independent dials – somehow like a regulator – placed on top of each other, in the middle of the derrick. The similarities between the dials and true industrial gages are such that they drive us to the command-centre of the gaz derrick. All around, there are several elements, evoking a detailed realism, that pique your curiosity: valves, pipelines, reservoirs, pumps, and even a central drilling axis.

The power source of this clock is located in the black base that supports the various decorative elements.  The movement allows for precise timekeeping for up to 7 days.  Made up of 281 fine pieces and expertly assembled by hand, the handiwork can be admired through discreet openings at the base of the derrick.  Gaz Derrick is presented in two limited editions (50 pieces each) with a black base; the movement and elements are either yellow gold- or palladium-plated.

Inspired by various types of building toys from their childhood, young talented designer Martin BOLO and Arnaud Nicolas, Brand Director, succeeded in creating a homogeneous and realistic structure, relying on the high-quality workmanship courtesy of L’Epée 1839’s age-old expertise.

The main elements of a gas extraction platform become an example of industrial architecture, the design allowing you to quickly and easily identify the structure behind this clock. In the middle, the derrick is standing, then the pipelines, valves and pumps. Everything is protected by a harmonious and fine squared protective glass atop the black base.

After having developed a movement with arms for Sherman, or legs (Arachnophobia) or even accompanying it with a skull mechanism (Requiem), L’Epée is bringing one of its signature calibre movements back to the table and offsets the hour and minute indicators thanks to bevel gears.  Discover a horizontal movement with horizontal escapement paired with a central axis of nearly 200 mm in length; this enables L’Epée 1839 to display hours and minutes way off its original position. Displayed separately, like the regulator movement of a watch, two independent dials allow you to read the hour and the minutes away from the movement itself.

Here, the key drilling axis element of a derrick becomes the central axis for the hour and minute hands, displaying all information to the user as though it were a derrick. Going even further with this industrial aspect, the dials themselves have been designed to look like manometers.

A derrick gas burner, located on the top, allows you to adjust overpressure and maintain safe installation; at L’Epée 1839, the Burner becomes the time-set crown, allowing you to adjust the hour in case the power supply runs out; for example, if the owner forgets to wind the mechanism.   With its one-week power reserve, the 1853RV calibre mechanical movement is entirely made at the Delémont factory workshop.

Just as rich mineral resources are extracted from beneath the ground to fuel the need for power, the Gaz Derrick by L’Epée 1839 runs on the energy of its barrel located inside the base, underneath the derrick. Regulators used in the petroleum industry are based on a system of pressure relief valves; here, the same happens but in the form of a time regulator with its actuator gear train and escapement. A signature feature for the brand, the mechanism is visible through potholes, enabling those who like beauty and mechanical structures to appreciate the workmanship.

Gaz Derrick features two hands equipped with Superluminova so that you can read the time regardless of the lighting.

The most impressive element of this kinetic sculpture is without any doubts the derrick. It measures more than 14.3 centimetres – this is a far cry from standard watch-making dimensions – and both the gold and palladium versions boast of perfect finishes. Essential for drilling, it is the key element here as well. The derrick supports the axis which sends power and information from the clock mechanism to the hour and minute hands.

Inside the derrick, the perfectly executed drill strings are used to hoist rock fragments and gas. Gaz Derrick also incorporates this drill string; it has been turned into the central axis for the timer, which allows you to set the hour and minute indicators.

Lower down, on the ground level, you will find a few typical elements that bring to mind a particular world while at the same time remaining true to the design.

The inquisitive spirits and questioning minds who wish to have a deeper understanding of the realisation will wonder where the winding-key hole is. In fact, there is none… Remember we are in a special environment; no holes can be made. So, the control valve, on the right side of the base field, is in fact the key for winding the movement.

Each week, all you have to do is to open the valve so that enough power is supplied to the clock, just as a petroleum operation manager will feed the gas derrick with gaz. By making between 5 and 7 complete rotations, the watch will be run for the next 7 days.

Technical details
Model: GAZ DERRICK

Reference
76.6007/002 – Gold-plated
76.6007/102 – Palladium-plated

Limited editions: 50 items per colour
Dimensions: 17.8 x 10 x 23.3 cm
Weight: 3.2 kg
Total of 281 components

Functions
Hour and minute display: two independent, white bright black pad-printed dials placed one on top of the other with hour indicator on the upper dial and minutes on the lower dial.  Time displayed by means of polished hands (gold- or palladium-plated depending on version) with Luminova (SLN Green to make up for lack of power).

L’epee 1839 Movement
Horizontal L’Epée 1839 movement designed and created in-house.
1853RV calibre – horizontal escapement
Frequency: 18’000 A/h / 2.5 Hz
Unique barrel
Power reserve: 7-day
Number of components: 147
Number of jewels: 11
Incabloc protection system
Gold- or palladium-plated brass mechanism
Hand-wind movement via solitary valve
Time adjust via crown above derrick
Materials: Stainless steel and brass
Included finishes: polished, sandblast, satin-finishing

Structure and Decorations
Number of components: 134 completely hand-finished components (movement not included).
– The Derrick: Fine industrial-style structure protecting the hour and minute referral mechanism.
– The Valve: Used for clock winding
– Motors: decorative, entirely hand-polished
– Pipeline: made from folded and plated brass rods
– Pump: Decorative, made from hand polished and satin-finished brass

Casing
Black aluminium base with exposed horizontal escapement on top and cylinder visible through two transparent circles
Mineral glass without prop

Vanitas – L’EPEE 1839 by Fiona Krüger

The horological creation Vanitas is born out of a partnership between Fiona Krüger and L’Epée 1839, Switzerland’s specialised high-end clock manufacturer, founded in 1839.

The Skull is the ultimate symbol of life, death and human experience – as such it has played a key role in both Horological History and Art History. Through Fiona Krüger’s artistic approach to Haute Horlogerie and L’Epée’s know-how, the Skull has been re-interpreted into a mechanical Vanitas painting for the 21st Century.

A Vanitas is a still life artwork which includes various symbolic objects to remind the viewer of the transience of life. This was an important and popular genre of painting in the 1600’s and includes symbols like skulls and extinguished candles.

Engineered and crafted by L’Epée 1839, the Vanitas clock reminds you to celebrate life. The hours and minutes are shown by the clock’s hands, and a power reserve indicator is integrated into the mouth of the skull. As Vanitas loses power it starts to yawn, indicating it needs to be wound up. Though with a 35-day power-reserve, this monthly ritual will give you a moment to stop and take stock of the time you have.

Fiona’s Fine Art and Design training, combined with her international upbringing are apparent in the design of this mechanical symbol. Having spent part of her childhood in Mexico City her vivid memories of the Dia de los Muertos festival have influenced her own skull collection and this latest collaboration with L’Epée. This mechanical Vanitas is rich in symbolism but also in humour.

The bridges of the clock are intricately detailed, designed to build up into a pattern which ultimately forms this ornate skull.

Creativity is at the heart of both L’Epée 1839 and Fiona Krüger Timepieces. The challenge was really to create this modern day Vanitas with a humorous twist. The new “yawning” power reserve indicator required a whole new development and re-engineering of the clock movement. It is a marriage between fantasy and purpose, which is at the core of the collaboration.

The ideas of life, time and mortality are synonymous and even more relevant in mechanical clock-making today than they have ever been. The unique design of the Skull imitating yawning as the power reserve depletes, joined with the ability to bring the clock to life as its wound up, reflects the history of clock making where fantasy, creativity and purpose were all incorporated in equal measure to create designs which made people dream.

When picturing a clock in your mind, everyone has a similar idea – round, 12 hours, two hands. Vanitas defies convention – the clock is itself a Skull, with mechanical eyes, a moving mouth and a distinctive case shape which frames the skull-shaped movement inside. The multi-layered bridges each have a specifically chosen finishing and décor, bringing depth to this sculptural skull. The hands bring a sense of familiarity to this innovative design which defies convention and brings together the worlds of Fine Art and Haute Horlogerie.

Next to all known contemporary Wall clocks, Vanitas stands out like a bold brush stroke on a blank canvas. This new co-creation features a frontal escapement, 2 barrel arbors as “pupils”, all designed to sculpt the mechanical skull’s face. Vanitas indicates the time by way of two hands which are centrally mounted on the nose.

These hand-polished hands indicate the hours and minutes, hiding and revealing the skull’s eyes as if it was playing hide-and-seek. Power reserve indicator: an indicator framed by two rows of teeth opens up as time passes, providing an intuitive view of remaining energy. When the mouth is completely opened (18.5mm apart from each other) the clock looks like it is “yawning” as a warning to its owner that it will go to sleep if some energy is not provided.

Vanitas is a luxury one-of-a-kind wall clock, featuring essentially the same mechanisms as a wristwatch, only larger: gear train, mainspring barrels (well, five in series), balance wheel, escape wheel and anchor. L’Epée’s regulator also features an Incabloc shock protection system, something generally only seen in wristwatches, which minimises the risk of damage when the clock is being transported.

Larger components, however, make finely finishing the movement much more challenging than finishing a wristwatch, because of the bigger surface areas.

Form follows function is a principle associated with modernist architecture and industrial design in the 20th century. The principle is that the shape of a building or object should be primarily based upon its intended function or purpose.

When it is reinterpreted by L’Epée 1839, the movement and the shape of the clock become one. The clock is no longer made of a movement and a housing which gives the shape of the clock. The movement itself defines the shape of the clock and the design cannot be recognized without the movement. The eyes are the barrels (two of them), the mouth is the power reserve, the philtra is the differential allowing the teeth to open up.

Vanitas is limited to 50 pieces per configuration and is now available in ‘dark’ and colourful editions.

Technical details

Display
Hours and minutes
Power reserve indicator

Main structure
Height 306 mm
Width 220 mm
Thickness 86 mm
Clock Weight: Approx. 5 kg. with 2.2 kg just for the movement
‘Dark’ version: Mat Housing in Black Anodized Aluminum with mineral glass
Colored Version: Mat Housing in Black Anodized Aluminum with mineral glass

Movement
L’Epée in-house designed and manufactured movement
Balance frequency 18,000 vph / 2.5Hz
Barrels 5 in series
Power reserve 35 days
Jewels 11
Incabloc shock protection system
Manual-winding Double-ended key to set time and wind movement on the skull face

‘Dark’ version
Mechanism in palladium-coated brass
Movement Main plates in black PVD coated brass
Multi-layered screen printed white decoration (gloss ink).

Colored Version
Mechanism in palladium-coated brass
Movement Main plate in brass black PVD coating
Multi-coloured screen-printed pattern (gloss ink). Each colour used in the design of the clock was specially selected as it represents a specific meaning pertaining to the Dia de Los Muertos celebration: Blue = Trust, White = Purity, Orange = Sun, Yellow = Death, Pink = Celebration, Red = Life and Purple = Grief and Black = Mortality (hence the black PVD coating)

MB&F Octopod by L’Epée 1839

The unusual partnership between contemporary mechanical luxury watchmaking lab MB&F and Switzerland’s premier clock maker, L’Epée 1839 now gives birth to an eight legged horology sculpture that in fact is an eight day mechanical clock inspired by cephalopods, marine chronometers and The Abyss.

Octopod stands on its eight articulated legs. Each leg can be individually adjusted to varying heights, enabling Octopod to rest securely on the most uneven of surfaces, just like a real octopus. However, the real horological magic and mystery take place in Octopod’s completely transparent spherical ‘head’.

The first thing to notice is that Octopod’s transparent sphere is gimballed in a similar way to how traditional ship chronometers were gimballed – although on one axis rather than two – so that they remained flat despite the pitching and rolling of the ship. In Octopod’s case, the gimbal ensures that no matter what angle or height it sits, it is easy to rotate the bubble so that the time display inside is at the ideal plane for maximum legibility.

The second thing the attentive eye will notice is that Octopod’s pulsating escapement, which regulates the clock’s precision, is located on its minute hand rather than the more usual (and mechanically simpler) position attached to stationary movement plates. While not technically a tourbillon according to Abraham-Louis Breguet’s original patent, with its movement vertical, the 60-minute rotation of Octopod’s regulator on the minute hand is closer to the primary aim of Breguet’s invention. His intention was to rotate the escapement of a pocket watch sitting vertically in a fob pocket to average out positional errors, while wristwatch tourbillons are continually moving through all positions without requiring 360° rotations.

And thirdly there’s the mystery of how Octopod’s clockwork is suspended inside its crystalline sphere, so that it appears to be floating in space (or water). The baseplate of the movement is a transparent glass plate that has been treated with a film of anti-reflective coating on both sides so that it is virtually invisible. Like an octopus concealing parts of itself with camouflage, Octopod conceals parts of itself with visual tricks of its own.

Octopod’s eight-day movement is an entirely new development by L’Epée 1839, with both the glass baseplate and counterbalanced regulator posing particular challenges.

Along with its octopus and marine chronometer connections to the sea, Octopod also brings to mind the then futuristic glass bathysphere of James Cameron’s 1989 film, The Abyss. Octopod is available in 3 limited editions of 50 pieces each in black PVD, blue PVD, and palladium (silver).

Technical details
Indications and complications
Hours, minutes and finely counter-balanced regulator mounted on minute hand

Body
Dimensions: 28 cm long x 28 cm high (standing), 45 cm long x 22 cm high (crouching)
Weight: 4.2 kg
Frame: Stainless steel, nickel and palladium plated brass
Components (body, legs and sphere): 309

Legs
8 legs each composed of 31 pieces
Articulation released by a button in each leg, can be locked in two positions (standing or extended)

Sphere
360° rotation in both vertical and horizontal planes with 3 sand-blasted and satin-finished brass rings
Two Polycarbonate hemispheres joined by a satin-finished three-piece band

Movement
L’Epée in-house designed and manufactured
Baseplate in transparent mineral glass, anti-reflective coating both sides
Balance frequency: 2.5 Hz / 18,000 bph
Power reserve: 8 days from single barrel
Components movement: 159
Jewels: 19
Incabloc shock protection system protected by mineral glass
Materials: palladium-plated brass, stainless steel and nickel-plated brass
Manual-winding: the double-depth square socket key sets time and winds movement

The Gold Sun Clock by Baccarat & L’EPEE 1839

The Sun clock, an impressive wall clock designed in 1948 by Georges Chevalier for Baccarat, re-issued in 2014 for the legendary manufacture 250th anniversary is seeing the light again today with its beams painted in 20K gold and with a L’Epée 1839 movement.

A solid crystal sunburst, whose sixteen pointed beams provide eye-catching effects of majesty and beauty, was inspired by the symbol of the Sun king, Louis XIV, and used on the gates of his palace at Versailles.

The dimensions of the clock are impressive: one meter of diameter (38 inches) and around 40 kgs (90 lbs) in weight. The highly visible, superlatively finished in-house movement boasts a power reserve of 25 days. Hours and minutes are indicated on the central skeleton movement by hand-manufactured and polished hands. Behind that, a full rotating gear wheels train allows the clock to keep track of time.

The regulator, which is deliberately placed on top for all to admire, and, as a king, to dominate everything, controls the precision of time. Every component (except for the 25 jewels) of the superlatively finished palladium-treated brass movement and housing is designed and manufactured at L’Epée’s Swiss atelier. The gears and mainspring barrels are on full display thanks to a skeletonised main plate.

In its original version, the clock was displayed in the window of Baccarat first boutique in New York where it caught the eye of Arthur Miller who chose it to decorate the Manhattan apartment he shared with his wife, Marilyn Monroe.

The Sun clock is an ultra-exclusive clock, featuring essentially the same mechanisms as a wristwatch, only larger: gear train, mainspring barrel (three in series), balance wheel, escape wheel and anchor. L’Epée’s regulator also features an Incabloc shock protection system, something generally only seen in wristwatches, which minimises the risk of damage when the clock is being transported. Limited and numbered edition of 50 pieces.

Technical Specifications

Display
Hours and minutes: Hand-made and hand-polished hands

Main structure
Diameter: approx. 1 meter diameter
Thickness: 7.5 cm

The sixteen crystal pointed beams are cut by the The Best French Craftsmen, “Meilleurs Ouvriers de France”. Recognized worldwide, the title is awarded to an elite of artisans capable of shaping exceptional works of art.

Baccarat handmade crystal trimmed with 20-carat gold (800/1000e) on the back of each of the sixteen beams. The gold plate is hand-applied by one of Baccarat’s most talented and experienced “doreuse”.

Movement
L’Epée 1839 in-house designed and manufactured movement
Balance frequency: 18,000 vph / 2.5Hz
Barrels: 3 in series
Power reserve: 25 days
Jewels: 25
Incabloc shock protection system

Mechanism and main plate in palladium-treated brass
Polished palladium-plated brass dial

Manual-winding: Double-ended key to set time and wind movement from the front.

Movement is protected by a mineral glass door.

BACCARAT

Baccarat is the oldest and greatest crystal manufacture in the world. Created in 1764 by permission of King Louis XV to this day it keeps its entire production in the same village in Lorraine where it first started. For over 250 years it has been the symbol of superb craftsmanship and of French “art de vivre”. The refined precision, the timeless elegance of its production, the continuous service to the royal houses and to the greats of the world have given Baccarat the status of a legend in its own right.

In addition to seducing the celebrities of the world, Baccarat’s designs immortalise the excellence of its savoir faire. This know-how is at the forefront of progress, handed down over the centuries by elite craftsmen and the ultimate emblem of an incomparable heritage. Ranging from iconic lighting to unique tableware and decorative objects, fine jewellery and tailor-made flacons, the brand’s products and tradition of excellence are recognised around the globe.

Georges Chevalier (1894 -1987)

A graduate of the École Nationale des Arts Décoratifs, in Paris, Georges Chevalier began working with Baccarat in 1916 ending his career there in the early ‘70s. His designs earned Baccarat a place at the forefront of the history of the decorative arts.
Georges Chevalier ensured that the Baccarat name would forever be associated with modernity and beyond thanks to his stylistic vocabulary and clean shapes and proportions. He used his remarkable artistry to create an animated vision of Baccarat, whose spirit he grasped instantly and instinctively.

His close collaboration with the craftsmen enabled him to overcome any technical constraints, he grasped the full complexity of crystal. He mastered the creation of both form and decoration and focused on setting up a constructive dialogue between artist and craftsmen. Geoges Chevalier delved eagerly into the archives of the manufactory to reinterpret the Maison heritage and codes and invent new designs drawing on the expertise of the master glassmakers, glass blowers, cutters and engravers.

L’Epée 1839 Qatar Clock by Eduard Indermaur

The L’Epée 1839 Qatar Clock was unveiled at the Doha Watches and Jewellery Show 2017.

The Qatar Collection is as unique as the country itself. Qatar clock sits among the clocks designed to stay timeless. It has its own personality and yet L’Epée clocks all have in common the quest of being among the best. It has its own Tourbillon escapement set on top of the movement. The regulator controls the full gear chain and delivers the exact quantity of energy to the gear train below, allowing it to keep track of time. The Tourbillon escapement is a high precision regulator, one of the most complicated function usually only available on the most exclusive wristwatch.

The Qatar clock is the clock of the powerful. Besides being a L’Epée 1839 clock which is known as the clock of the influential and powerful, the clock itself is set as Royal court. Its regulator, which has deliberately been placed on top for all to admire, controls, as a king, the powers of all … and so, controls the precision of the clock’s time.

The Qatar By Eduard Indermaur (Ref. 61.6850/021) is an exclusive solid brass clock in an extremely luxurious unique edition. The clock is hand-made in L’Epée’s manufacture and decorated by the Swiss artist glass-maker Eduard Indermaur.

The deep-stained glass panels are signed and numbered by the artist. The Scenery call “Summer” is in fact a reinterpretation of the desert Oasis. Red, white and green are the most noticeable colors of the painting. Besides being very poetic, they are also three important symbols in the Islamic culture. The green color, which symbolizes life and nature, is most strongly associated with Islam as it has represented Islam for centuries.

Some believe that green was the Prophet Muhammad’s favorite color, and it is mentioned in a number of verses in the Quran as the color that will be worn by the inhabitants of paradise. White is perhaps the second-most associated color with Islam. The color white, besides often being worn by Muslims attending Friday prayers, symbolizes purity and peace. Although red is often also associated with Islam, it does not have any particular religious significance.

Red references blood in its many meanings. Blood is the life force – the Divine gift given us by the Creator: to generate life, live to produce and create, and finally surrender our life to the One Who gave it.

The movement of this clock is placed in the center of a stained glass environment supported by a fully gold-plated carriage clock style housing.

This timepiece features the same innovative movement with a new Tourbillon for which L’Epée 1839 is well known. The movement bears two important complications, which are also important symbols within the L’Epée 1839 history. The main plates, surrounding the mechanical system of the strike and hour/minute display, represent the Qatar map.

The gold-plated plates reflect the beauty of the strike setting mechanism on the front of the clock, especially the rack, behind the two black lacquered hands, that trigger the entire process until the final gong on the hour and every ½ hour. Up on the clock, the Tourbillon can be admired through a special opening.

The shape of this opening clearly reminds you of the fascinating curves of the Islamic architecture, and more accurately the cupolas surmounting the domed mosques. Set between the main plates the great waltz of the wheels can be admired. Each component of the movement is machined and superlatively finished during the manufacture in Switzerland.

Considered to be one of the three finest horological complications, the Tourbillon is placed at the very top of the structure in these unique clocks, for all to admire. Its dimensions are such that the beholder is quickly captivated by the majestic waltz of the balance wheel. The design of the bridge supporting the carriage is a new design made especially on demand. Entirely produced in the L’Epée workshops, it is made of gold-plated brass with a flawless finish.

While a wristwatch can only accommodate small gongs, this Qatar Collection strikes every hour and ½ hours on a long black gong visible on the back of the clock, that strives for a rich and convincing sound.

When it is one O’clock, the clock will strike once, at Two, twice, etc, until noon and its twelve gongs. In the afternoon, it will start again with one gong. The initiation of the mechanism is placed on the front of the clock, next to the hour-wheel so the entire strike-process can be admired.

Entirely made and conceived in Switzerland, at the L’Epée manufacture, the full process is mastered to perfectly reflect the beauty of the mechanism.

Technical Specifications

Display
Hours and Minutes: black skeleton hands on the center of the clock
Front plate: Strike system with gong and mechanically activated every 30 minutes.

Functions
Hours and Minutes
Tourbillon
Strike: Hours and half

Main structure
Ref. 61.6850/021
Brass and Glass
Dimensions: 173 x 255 x 153 mm

Movement
L’EPÉE in-house designed and manufactured movement – Caliber 1880 T.
Balance frequency: 18,000 vph / 2.5Hz
Power reserve: 8 days
Jewels: 14
Incabloc shock protection system
Manual-winding: Double-ended key to set time and wind movement
Materials and finishing: Massive gold-plated Brass
Time setting: On the back of the clock with a unique gold-plated L’Epée key
The two main plates supporting the entire in-house movement are in the shape of Qatar.

L’Epée 1839 Requiem by Kostas Metaxas

Swiss mechanical clock manufacture L’Epée 1839 unveils Requiem: a table clock with an 8-day movement designed in partnership with Kostas Metaxas. This limited edition takes its inspiration from the shape of a human skull and displays the time in the sockets of the eye.

Requiem is a table clock designed and manufactured by L’Epée 1839, Swiss specialist of high-end kinetic clocks. It measures nearly 19 centimeters (7.4 inches) high and weighs about 2 kilograms (6 pounds). It is made of cast aluminum which is then perfectly finished off in the Swiss workshops of L’Epée 1839. Two skull finishings are available: a black skull associated with a movement in gold-plated brass, or a silver color version: aluminum skull and palladium-plated movement. The new movement is an internally designed 1853 HMD caliber with an 8-day power reserve. This new movement features two discs that display a “slow” jumping hour and sweeping minutes.

Opting for a timeless artistic genre: Memento Mori, L’Epée 1839 and the designer take on a graphic and technical challenge. Memento Mori, literally translated as “Remember that you are going to die”, reminds Man of the humility he must show in the face of eternity.

Kostas Metaxas has chosen to place a horological mechanism deep in the center of the skull, representative of a brain which is master of its destiny but encapsulated. Symbols of intimate ties uniting life and time. The eyes, on the other hand, are spectators of time passing and quite naturally the hour invites itself in the eye sockets. The reading of the hours and minutes is achieved by two transparent discs placed respectively in the right eye and the left eye.

The protective housing formed by the skull around the movement allows only a few reflections of light to filter through openings: two crossed swords, symbol of the brand, placed on the temples, such as openings on another temporal space, suggest the rhythmic oscillations of the escapement.

The first piece in the new Skull artistic collection, L’Épée 1839 deliberately wanted this emblematic table clock to remain sober, modern and visually delicate.

Requiem is a limited edition of 50 pieces per configuration: black skull and golden movement, or aluminum skull and palladium movement (silver color).

The Movement
Composed of 160 pieces entirely designed, finished and assembled in the workshops of L’Epée 1839 (except the 24 rubies), the movement is available in two finishings: gold or palladium.

The hour and minutes are displayed inside the eyes, thanks to a system of discs on which the time indications are stamped. L’Epée 1839 adds a whole new complication to its 8-day movement: the disc mechanism displays a “slow” jumping hour and sweeping minutes respectively.

In the presence of a conventional jumping hour indication, it is difficult to know whether the jump has already taken place or not. It is therefore possible to misread the time. In order to avoid this, L’Epée 1839 developed a “slow” jumping hour.As a result of this complication, the hour disk remains stationary during the first 55 minutes of an hour; Then, rather than jumping instantly, it starts to slowly turn five minutes before the new hour. This gradual jump is more easily noticed and the reading of the time is made easier.

With an8-day power reserve, Requiem has to be rewound each week, so offering an intimate moment with its symbolic, thanks to a key specifically placed at the base of the skull, as to represent an essential axis in the human being. From the nape of the neck or more precisely from the cervical plexus in Humans, all information, wills and decisions will be sent to the organs and members. Here, it is the energy necessary for the proper functioning of the table clock which is transmitted through this gesture. The unique key also allows you to set the time.

The Skull
Far from the traditional clock, these 2 kilograms of skull can disturb even in all of its sobriety. Two swords were engraved on the sides of the aluminum skull to let in the light and give reflections to the movement. The jaw designed to be very realistic is composed of 24 independent teeth.

Each story, each life, each skeleton is unique, bearing the stigmata of time. To make the timepiece even more realistic, L’Epée 1839 has deliberately left small defects, specifically, individually and harmoniously located on each skull, as a sign of life, leaving you to imagine a story and making each timepiece totally unique.

The skull rests on two pillars, recalling the two trapezius muscles, in the middle of which the key is positioned. The aluminum base ensures the stability of the clock.

Technical details

Requiem is available in two versions:
– Black version: black skull and golden movement
– Silver version: aluminum skull and palladium movement
Limited edition: 2 x 50 pieces
Dimensions: 19 cm high x 12 cm wide x 16 cm deep
Weight: 1.9 kg
Total components: 194 pieces

The Skull
Weight: 1.1 kg
Materials: machined cast aluminum
Finishings: black lacquer, or raw aluminum, and colorless protective varnish
Jaws: 12 molars and 12 incisors

The Movement
The hour and minutes are displayed in the eyes of the skull with two stamped discs.
L’Epée 1839 movement developed and manufactured in house
1853 HMD caliber
Single barrel
Power Reserve: 8 days
Number of components: 160 pieces
Rubis: 24
Incabloc Anti-Shock System
Movement dimensions:
Materials: brass and stainless steel
Finishings: gold plated or palladium plated
Manual winding of movement actuated by a specially designed key

The Support
An aluminum column system connects the skull to the base on which the movement is fixed.
The unique key for Requiem’s time setting and manual rewinding interlocks directly between the columns.

MB&F Balthazar – In Association with L’Epée 1839

Once again, Geneva based Horological Concept Laboratory MB&F and L’Epée 1839, the venerated Swiss watch manufacture of high end mechanical clocks, join hands to create a horological masterpiece, this time a new generation horological robot.

Balthazar is a sophisticated and imposing high-precision robot clock displaying jumping hours, retrograde seconds and a 35-day power reserve. Weighing in at over eight kilograms (18 pounds) and standing nearly 40 centimetres tall (16 inches), Balthazar is composed of 618 beautifully finished, micro-engineered components.

Balthazar boasts dual faces. With amazing 35 days of power reserve, Balthazar’s clockwork displays “slow” jumping hours and trailing minutes via two discs on the chest, while the power reserve indicator is located on his belly. His red eyes, which continually scan the surroundings, are actually 20-second retrograde displays.

Moving higher still to Balthazar’s “brain” under the polished glass dome, we find the precision regulator of the clockwork.  Balthazar rotates around the hips like the high-precision machine that he is; you can feel the miniscule bumps of each micro-roller as he turns, and each distinct notch when he rotates the full 180°.

On the other side, the absolute nature of Balthazar’s darkness is revealed by the coldhard skull with menacing teeth and deep-set ruby-red eyes. But it’s not all threat here as Balthazar’s chest also contains a moon phase display accurate for 122 years. You can adjust the moon phase manually, providing one of many of Balthazar’s tactile pleasures.

Balthazar does more than display horological events: as well as rotating around the hips, his arms articulate at both the shoulders and the elbows, and his hands can clasp and hold objects. Finally, Balthazar’s shield conceals and protects an integrated clock-winding and time-setting key.

A spectacular example of high-precision micro-engineering, Balthazar required 618 components go into the construction of his body and clockwork, which are more pieces than in most complicated wristwatches.

Developing Balthazar’s movement required significant modifications to the previous movement that L’Epée had created for Melchior (MB&F and L’Epée first cobranded robot-clock) that it is basically a new movement. As well as the addition of a double hemisphere moon phase complication, Balthazar is around 30% taller than Melchior so an additional gear train was required to connect the regulator with the rest of the clockwork.

With a normal jumping hour indication, between five minutes to the hour and five minutes past it can be difficult to know if the jump has occurred or not. So L’Epée developed a ‘slow’ jumping hour, which sees the hour disc remain static for 55 minutes and then – rather than jump instantly and risk the jump being missed – start to turn five minutes before the hour. The jump is so gradual that it can be easily seen.

Balthazar’s movement features a regulator (his brain) with an Incabloc shock protection system to minimise risk of damage to this critical component when the clock is being transported or moved. This type of shock protection is generally only seen in wristwatches. Balthazar’s movement also features the fine finishing techniques found in high end luxury watches: Geneva waves, anglage, mirror polishes, sandblasting, circular and vertical satin finishing.

Balthazar comes in limited editions of 50 pieces per colour in black, silver, blue or green armour plates.

Technical details
Displays
“Slow” jumping hours and sweeping minutes: twin discs on the chest feature MB&F’s signature numerals and respectively display hours and minutes
20-second retrograde second display in eyes: red “pupils” in each eye scan over 20-second intervals and indicate seconds
35-day power reserve indicator: dial on the belly provides intuitive view of remaining energy
Double hemisphere moon phase indicator: phases of the moon are displayed on a disc on the “dark side” chest

Movement
L’Epée 1839 in-house designed and manufactured movement.
Balance frequency: 18,000 bph / 2.5Hz
Barrels: 5 in series
Power reserve: 35 days
Movement components: 405
Jewels: 62
Incabloc shock protection system
Clockwork in palladium-plated brass and stainless steel
Manual-winding: double-depth square socket key sets time and winds movement; when not in use the key integrates into a dedicated slot in the shield
Movement finishing includes Geneva waves (moon phase and power reserve bridges), polishing, sandblasting, circular and vertical satin finishing and starburst decoration

Balthazar’s body and armour
Dimensions: 39.4 cm high x 23.8 cm wide (depending on position of the arms) x 12.4 cm (boot size)
Weight: 8.2 kg
Body/armour components: 213
Movement mainplate in palladium-plated polished brass

Head
Dome: polished glass secured via polished and bevelled palladium-plated brass bezel, circular brushed finish around escapement
Skull: nickel-plated bronze with brushed and sandblasted finishes
Teeth: each tooth milled in stainless steel and polished before being mounted into the skull individually
Eyes: 20-second retrograde seconds display in stainless steel painted with red lacquer

Torso
Breastplate in three pieces, breast and two CVD colour-treated shoulder pads
Hours, minutes, and power reserve indicators on one breastplate, moon phase display on the other.
Protective plate in sapphire crystal

Hips
Rotate on precision ball bearings with spring click to indicate and hold at resting positions
Balthazar’s centre of gravity is low around the hips to minimise any risk of being knocked over

Legs
Each leg weighs 1.5 kg.
Each femur is in 3 parts to reinforce the look of telescopic-potential and armour plating
Legs, shins, and feet in nickel-plated brass

Shoulders and arms
Articulation: pivot at arms/shoulders, rotation at the elbows, pivot lower arms with spring locking system
Fingers: on each hand, two fingers cross into the other three so that the hands can clasp
Shield: double-depth square-socket key in polished and laser-engraved nickel-plated brass with integrated winding/time-setting key
Key is palladium-treated to maximise the longevity of the polished finish

MB&F ‘Sherman’ by L’Epée 1839

Sherman is a cute little horological robot designed and developed by MB&F in association with L’Epée 1839, Switzerland’s only specialised high-end clock manufacture.

Sherman’s mechanics are based on a L’Epée 1839 in-line eight-day movement, which ensures that the friendly tank-treaded table clock can display the correct time on his chest for more than a week before requiring rewinding.

But Sherman is not simply a clock inside a robot, but an integral and holistic robot-clock. The mainspring barrel bridge extends down to support his tracks, movement spacers act as shoulders for the arms, and his eyes are bolt heads supporting the regulator. The movement plates and bridges of the clock also make up the skeleton and body of the robot.

The transparent blown mineral glass dome on Sherman’s head reveals his mechanical brain, which is actually the regulator controlling the precision of the robot’s time. It’s mesmerising to watch the little guy “think”. Sherman’s arms can be manipulated into nearly any configuration, and his hands can be used to hold items like a pen or his winding key.

And while Sherman doesn’t walk, his rubber caterpillar tracks are fully functional and, with a little help from a friend, he can roll over the rugged terrain of a typical office desk. But as cool as Sherman’s robotic and horological accomplishments are, they pale in comparison with his emotional superpower of spreading happiness wherever he goes.

Sherman is launched in limited editions of 200 palladium (plated) pieces, 200 gilded pieces (gold-plated) and 50 diamond-set gilded pieces.

Sherman’s name is derived from the prolific M4 Sherman tank used by the USA and its allies in World War II. Despite being technically surpassed by larger and more powerful tanks toward the end of the war, the Sherman tank proved to remain effective because it was extremely reliable and easy to produce. Better to have lots of smaller tanks in action than smaller numbers of larger, more complex tanks sitting in the garage. Officially called the Medium Tank M4; it was dubbed the Sherman M4 by the British, who named it after General William Tecumseh Sherman. Sherman rose to command the Western Union army (succeeding General Ulysses S. Grant) during the American Civil War (1861 – 1865) and then headed the American army when Grant assumed the presidency. British military historian B. H. Liddell Hart called Sherman “the first modern general”.

While the name of Sherman may have originated in a war scenario, he is most definitely a robot of peace. Sherman is fitted with the most powerful weapon of all: the ability to spread happiness and unabashed joy.

Technical Specifications
Display: Hours and minutes displayed on Sherman’s chest
Size: Dimensions: 143 mm tall x 109 mm wide x 80 mm deep
Weight: 0.9 kg
Body/frame
Options: Fully palladium-plated (polished silver colour); gold-plated with palladium-plated going train (gearing) and nickel-plated balance wheel; and fully gold-plated body and movement,gem-set with 735 high quality VVS diamonds around the eyes, hour markers and head.
Dome/head: blown mineral glass

Movement
L’Epée in-house designed and manufactured in-line eight-day movement
Balance frequency: 2.5 Hz / 18,000 bph
Power reserve: 8 days
Components movement: 148
Jewels: 17
Incabloc shock protection system
Movement finishing: Geneva waves, anglage, polishing, sandblasting, circular and vertical graining, satin finishing
Winding: double-depth square socket key sets time and winds movement at back of clock

MB&F Melchior Only Watch 2015 Unique Piece in Association with L’Epée 1839

Swiss horological lab MB & F unveils a unique piece of Melchior (a robot-cum-table clock) to Only Watch, a biennial charity auction of unique timepieces under the High Patronage of HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco to raise money for research on Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).

Melchior is a high-end table clock crafted by L’Epée 1839– Switzerland’s only specialised high-end clock manufacture – featuring jumping hours, sweeping minutes, double retrograde seconds, and an impressive40-day power reserve drawing from five mainspring barrels. Hours and minutes are displayed via discs on Melchior’s chest, while a dial on his abdomen indicates the state of wind of that long power reserve. Melchior’s eyes blink through a combination of fixed vents and revolving discs, endowing the robot with a playful touch of human-like personality.

The unique piece Melchior Only Watch is the 100th and final piece in the Melchior series. Clothed in palladium-plated brass and steel with bright red shoulder pads, Melchior is sure to put smiles on children’s faces and melt the hearts of adults.

MB&F founder Maximilian Büsser developed the Melchior concept with designer Xin Wang in a quest to revisit his childhood hankering for a robot friend. Melchior comprises no fewer than 480 components, each one machined and finished at L’Epée’s Swiss atelier, bar the 50 movement jewels. An impressive 334 components make up the movement, while another 146 pieces comprise Melchior’s bodywork and armour.

Such was the originality of MB&F’s robot concept that L’Epée needed to develop several new components: Machining, finishing and assembling a piece like the bulging glass dome forming Melchior’s skull was a first for L’Epée, as was crafting a stainless steel winding/time-setting key to resemble a Gatling gun.

The winding/time-setting key clips into Melchior’s left elbow joint socket. It is held by a small magnet strong enough to hold the key, but not so powerful as to affect the function of the movement. The key boasts a double-depth square socket that neatly fits over both of the square pegs on the back of Melchior. One of the pegs is for winding the movement, the other for time setting.

Working from MB&F’s design, L’Epée diligently developed the various bodywork and armour components, carefully choosing materials according to the properties required. Where precision was critical – Melchior’s kinetic parts and his precision rocket launcher, for instance – plated brass was selected. His armour on the other hand is crafted mainly in stainless steel, providing optimal resistance to withstand any enemy attacks.

And for the finishing touch, L’Epée have applied a range of eye-catching finishes to Melchior’s bodywork – including anglage, mirror polishing, satin finishing, circular satin finishing, sand-blasting and polishing.

To create Melchior’s highly visible movement, L’Epée developed a completely new skeletonised main plate in palladium-plated brass, which sandwiches the movement mechanism, also in palladium-plated brass.

For clear reading of the hour, L’Epée developed a ‘slow’ jumping hour. This in-house complication sees the hour disc remain static for 55 minutes, then start to turn five minutes before the new hour so that the change of hour is smooth and subtle. The movement regulator features an Incabloc shock protection system, which minimises the risk of damage when the clock is being transported. This sort of shock protection is generally only seen in wristwatches. In fact, Melchior’s exclusive table clock movement features the same type of mechanisms as a wristwatch – gear train, spring barrel (here, five in series), balance wheel, escape wheel, and anchor – but their dimensions are far larger.

The movement also features superlative fine finishing – côtes de Genève, anglage, polishing, sandblasting, circular and vertical satin finishing – that is seen on a wristwatch. However, finely finishing a clock movement is far more challenging than finishing a wristwatch because of the greater surface areas of the larger components.

Technical Specifications
Melchior Only Watch is a unique piece for Only Watch 2015 with bright red anodised aluminium shoulder pads contrasting against the monochromatic body. The back is engraved “Melchior Only Watch Piece Unique”.

Display
‘Slow’ jumping hours and sweeping minutes: Twin discs forming part of Melchior’s breast plate, one disc displaying hours, the other disc minutes, both featuring MB&F’s signature numerals
Retrograde seconds: Flyback discs mark 20-second intervals behind a steel mask
Power reserve indicator: Dial on abdomen providing intuitive view of remaining energy

Movement
L’Epée in-house designed and manufactured movement
Balance frequency: 18,000 bph / 2.5Hz
Barrels: 5 in series
Power reserve: 40 days
Movement components: 334
Jewels: 50
Incabloc shock protection system
Mechanism in palladium-plated brass
Manual-winding: double-depth square socket key sets time and winds movement
Movement finishing: includes côtes de Genève, anglage, polishing, sandblasting, circular and vertical satin finishing

Melchior’s body and armour
Dimensions: 30.3cm x 21.7cm (depending on position of the arms) x 11.2cm
Weight: 6.3kg
Body/armour components: 146

Head
Dome: polished glass screwed via polished and bevelled palladium-plated brass bezel
Retrograde seconds display in stainless steel
Movement mainplate in palladium-plated brass

Torso
Breastplate (forming hour and minute hands) in palladium-plated brass
Abdomen (power reserve indicator frame) in stainless steel
Ribcage/spine (formed by skeletonised main plate) in palladium-plated brass

Legs
Pelvis, thighs, shins and feet in stainless steel
Hips (long central bars joining pelvis) in stainless steel

Shoulders and arms
Shoulders in red anodised aluminium
Upper arms and lower arm sockets in stainless steel; magnet in left arm socket
Right forearm: screwed-in rocket with chrome-plated brass body and stainless steel warhead
Left forearm: Gatling gun/detachable stainless steel winding key with palladium-plated brass
Body and armour finishing includes anglage, mirror polishing, satin finishing, circular satin finishing, sandblasting, polishing.

MB&F ‘Arachnophobia’ by L’Epée 1839

This time, the latest horological machine coming out of MB&F’s high tech lab in Geneva reminds us a creepy creature that injects fear to our minds whenever it comes across.

The name ‘Arachnophobia’ itself indicates how powerful is the new creation from the Geneva based watch brand which is established since 2005 and produces extreme horological machines. Named Arachnophobia, which means fear of spiders, this eye-catching three-dimensional sculpture, which is also an impeccably finished table (and wall) clock, was conceived and developed by MB&F, and engineered and crafted by L’Epée 1839 – Switzerland’s only specialised high-end clock manufacture.

Arachnophobia was inspired by a giant spider sculpture called Maman that Büsser had seen in both Geneva and Doha. Maman (mother in French), was created by Louise Bourgeois (1911 – 2010) in bronze, stainless steel, and marble. Measuring 9.27 x 8.91 x 10.24 metres (more than 30 x 33 feet), the monumental sculpture has been installed in a variety of locations around the world.

Büsser developed the highly unusual concept with L’Epée, selecting a high-end L’Epée clock movement and re-imagining it as the mechanical head and torso of a spider. The body is outfitted with a black dome with white numerals depicting the hours and minutes. The araneae’s self-sufficiency is to be admired, for the finely-finished, highly-visible movement boasts a power reserve of eight days.

At either end of Arachnophobia’s time-displaying abdomen, important mechanical processes take place: the head houses the regulator with its oscillating balance wheel (and a set of jaws in case it gets peckish at night), while the other end contains the mainspring barrel, which powers the movement. Attached to the abdomen are eight, visually enticing legs articulated where they join the body by ball-and-socket joints. The legs can be rotated so that Arachnophobia can stand tall on a desk or splayed flat for wall mounting. A third position provides an optical treat for fans of large arachnids: the front legs can be moved forward while the six others maintain the standing position, an interesting and alarming posture that says, look out!

Arachnophobia is available in two colours, black or yellow gold. While individual tastes will vary, the black version is more realistic-looking and may be even intimidating to some; the gilded model has a more sculptured artistic appearance. While Arachnophobia is not nearly as large as the sculpture that inspired it, at 405 mm in diameter with the legs fully extended, or hanging on a wall, it is certainly large enough to make a real impression.

Arachnophobia comprises no fewer than 218 components; each one (except the jewels) machined and finished at L’Epée’s Swiss atelier.

Manufacturing realistic legs to faithfully replicate MB&F’s unusual design was no easy task. L’Epée had to find a solution for the legs that ensured that they would be both realistic-looking and articulated. The legs also had to conform to the standards of high watchmaking in that they could be nicely finished by hand. L’Epée came up with the novel solution of injection moulding metal to obtain the precise geometry needed. Injection moulding is a process of manufacturing components by injecting material (in this case metal) into a mould. The material is first subjected to high heat, then forced into the mould cavity. It then cools to the desired shape before being removed from the mould. While this is a very common process for shaping plastics, it is less common for shaping metals.

Arachnophobia is available in two colours, yellow gold and black, which required two different metals for the legs. The gold-coloured edition features gilded brass legs, while the black version’s legs are made of injection-moulded aluminium, which is hand-finished and lacquered black. Finishing techniques used on the clock’s “body” and legs include anglage, mirror polishing, satin finishing, circular satin finishing, sand-blasting, and polishing.  To really make a statement, L’Epée has also developed a system enabling Arachnophobia to be hung on a wall. An innovative catch underneath the movement hooks on to a stainless steel wall bracket.

In creating Arachnophobia’s highly visible movement, L’Epée had to transform its eight-day movement to look more like a spider body. The palladium-plated main plates were redesigned as was the layout of the gear train to fit the design. The escapement was rotated 90° to better represent the head.

The hours and minutes are read on a high dome representing the spider’s body, with rotating curved hands indicating hours and minutes on a polished, central dome featuring MB&F’s signature numerals.

The movement’s regulating organ features an Incabloc shock protection system, which minimises the risk of damage when the clock is being transported. This type of shock protection is generally only seen in wristwatches. The index mechanism for fine-tuning the timing, along with the other components of this all-important high-precision subassembly, are clearly visible on the head.

The movement features superlative fine finishing of the type generally found on the finest wristwatches, including Côtes de Genève, anglage, polishing, sand-blasting, and circular and vertical satin finishing. However, finely finishing a clock movement is far more challenging than finishing a wristwatch because of the greater surface areas of the larger components.

The underside of the spider is the key (quite literally) to winding and setting Arachnophobia.

Technical Specifications
Arachnophobia is available in black and 18k yellow gold-plated editions.
Hours and minutes: curved hands rotate to indicate hours and minutes on a polished, central dome featuring MB&F’s signature numerals.
L’Epée in-house designed and manufactured movement.
Balance frequency: 18,000 bph / 2.5Hz
Power reserve: 8 days
Total components: 218
Jewels: 11
Incabloc shock protection system
Mechanism in palladium-plated brass or gold-plated brass
Winding: key winding and setting on underside of clock
Movement finishing: includes Côtes de Genève, anglage, polishing, sand-blasting, circular and vertical satin finishing
Dimensions: 203 mm in height (legs extended); clock diameter (legs flat) 405 mm; movement dimensions 75.3 x 134.9 x 63.8 mm
Weight: gold-plated version 1.96 kg; black version 0.98 kg

MB&F BY L’EPÉE 1839 – MELCHIOR

MB&F celebrates its 10th anniversary in 2015 and to commemorate this milestone, the Geneva-based Horological lab will present a number of Anniversary Pieces during the year, under the theme:”A creative adult is a child who survived”. The first piece is Melchior, created in association with L’Epée 1839: an impressive kinetic robot featuring an impeccably finished, 480-component mechanical table clock that displays jumping hours, sweeping minutes, double retrograde seconds and a 40-day power reserve

Conceived and developed by concept lab MB&F, and engineered and crafted by L’Epée 1839 – Switzerland’s only specialised high-end clock manufacture – Melchior is the result of Maximilian Büsser’s quest to revisit his childhood hankering for a robot friend.

Christening this roboclock ‘Melchior’ – after a traditional forename in his family – Büsser developed the concept with designer Xin Wang, selecting a high-end L’Epée clock movement and reimagining it as the mechanical head and torso of a robot. Jumping hours and sweeping minutes on Melchior’s chest are displayed via discs bearing MB&F’s signature numerals – with pointers incorporated into the breastplate – while a dial on Melchior’s abdomen is the power reserve indicator. And this robot’s self-sufficiency is to be admired, for the finely-finished, highly-visible movement boasts a power reserve of 40 days – for most table clocks, it is eight days – thanks to five main spring barrels which help make up Melchior’s rippling torso. The barrels are in series for optimal performance. Melchior is limited to 99 pieces and is available in a monochromatic ‘light’ edition or a two-tone ‘dark and light’ edition featuring black PVD-treated components.

The retrograde action of Melchior’s expressive eyes marks off intervals of 20 seconds. A combination of fixed vents and revolving discs, both bearing radial propeller motifs, gives the impression that Melchior is closing and opening his eyes – the resulting blinking effect endows the robot with a hint of endearing human-like personality.

Further animation is provided by the regulator, its gentle beating and intricate composition made visible thanks to its polished glass dome cover. If the protective dome acts like a skull, then the regulator symbolises Melchior’s brain at work; just as the brain governs the body, the regulator governs the clock’s remarkable precision.

The steel upper arms of Melchior rotate and his lower arms pivot up or down – excellent manoeuvrability for aiming his rocket launcher or Gatling gun to blast away the bad guys. And in a neat design touch, his gun detaches and doubles as the winding/setting key for the movement. Melchior comprises no fewer than 480 components, each one machined and finished at L’Epée’s Swiss atelier, bar the 50 movement jewels. An impressive 334 components make up the movement, while another 146 pieces comprise Melchior’s bodywork and armour. Such was the originality of MB&F’s robot concept that L’Epée needed to develop several new components: Machining, finishing and assembling a piece like the bulging glass dome forming Melchior’s skull was a first for L’Epée, as was crafting a stainless steel winding/time-setting key to resemble a Gatling gun.

The winding/time-setting key clips into Melchior’s left elbow joint socket. It is held by a small magnet strong enough to hold the key, but not so powerful as to affect the function of the movement. The key boasts a double-depth square socket that neatly fits over both of the square pegs on the back of Melchior. One of the pegs is for winding the movement, the other for time-setting.

Working from MB&F’s design, L’Epée diligently developed the various bodywork and armour components, carefully choosing materials according to the properties required. Where precision was critical – Melchior’s kinetic parts or his precision rocket launcher, for instance – plated brass was selected. His armour on the other hand is crafted mainly in stainless steel, providing optimal resistance to withstand any enemy attacks. And for the finishing touch, L’Epée have applied a range of eye-catching finishes to Melchior’s bodywork – including anglage, mirror polishing, satin finishing, circular satin finishing, sand-blasting and polishing.

To create Melchior’s highly visible movement, L’Epée developed a completely new skeletonised mainplate, in palladium-plated brass, which sandwiches the movement mechanism, also in palladium-plated brass. This mainplate – which forms the ribcage, breastplate, cheekbones and backbones of the robot – is black PVD-treated for the ‘darkand-light’ edition of Melchior. For clear reading of the hour, L’Epée developed a ‘slow’ jumping hour. This in-house complication sees the hour disc remain static for 55 minutes, then start to turn five minutes before the new hour so that the change of hour is smooth and subtle.

The movement regulator features an Incabloc shock protection system, which minimises the risk of damage when the clock is being transported. This sort of shock protection is generally only seen in wristwatches. In fact, Melchior’s exclusive table clock movement features the same type of mechanisms as a wristwatch – gear train, mainspring barrel (here five, in series), balance wheel, escape wheel and anchor – but their dimensions are far larger.

The movement also features superlative fine finishing – Côtes de Genève, anglage, polishing, sand-blasting, circular and vertical satin finishing – that is seen on a wristwatch. However, finely finishing a clock movement is far more challenging than finishing a wristwatch because of the greater surface areas of the larger components.

Enjoy the MELCHIOR Video:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05quYjiu0yM&feature=youtu.be

Technical details
Display
Jumping hours and sweeping minutes: Twin discs forming part of Melchior’s breast plate, one disc displaying hours, the other disc minutes, both featuring MB&F’s signature numerals
Retrograde seconds: Flyback discs mark 20-second intervals behind a steel mask
Power reserve indicator: Dial on abdomen providing intuitive view of remaining energy

Movement
L’Epée in-house designed and manufactured movement
Balance frequency: 18,000 bph / 2.5Hz
Barrels: 5 in series
Power reserve: 40 days
Movement components: 334
Jewels: 50
Incabloc shock protection system
Mechanism in palladium-plated brass
Manual-winding: double-depth square socket key sets time and winds movement
Movement finishing: includes Côtes de Genève, anglage, polishing, sand-blasting, circular and vertical satin finishing

Melchior’s Body and Armour
Dimensions: 30.3cm x 21.7cm (depending on position of the arms) x 11.2cm
Weight: 6.3kg
Body/armour components: 146

Head
-Dome: polished glass screwed via polished and bevelled palladium-plated brass bezel
-Retrograde seconds display in stainless steel
-Movement mainplate in palladium-plated brass

Torso
-Breastplate (forming hour and minute hands) in palladium-plated brass
-Abdomen (power reserve indicator frame) in stainless steel
-Ribcage/spine (formed by skeletonised mainplate) in palladium-plated brass

Legs
-Pelvis, thighs, shins and feet in stainless steel
-Hips (long central bars joining pelvis) in stainless steel

Shoulders And Arms
-Shoulders, upper arms and lower arm sockets in stainless steel; magnet in left arm socket
-Right forearm: screwed-in rocket with chrome-plated brass body and stainless steel warhead
-Left forearm: Gatling gun/detachable stainless steel winding key with palladium-plated brass

Body and armour finishing includes anglage, mirror polishing, satin finishing, circular satin finishing, sand-blasting, polishing. ‘Shoulders’, ‘pelvis’ and skeletonised mainplate treated with black PVD for the two-tone ‘dark and light’ edition of Melchior

L’Epée 1839 Two Hands

L’Epée, the prestigious clock manufacture based in Switzerland celebrates its 175th anniversary by developing a new timepiece which pays tribute to the brand’s history and origins. The Two Hands special edition clock, which is equipped with special Tourbillon, is created in collaboration with Vincent Calabrese, a well known figure of the Horology world.

The most surprising complication, the tourbillon comes and takes place in the middle of this piece of art. It becomes flying, and stands proudly on the middle of the Turbine shape inspired design. The movement, designed by Vincent Calabrese, includes a double tourbillon. As the movement is rotating on the single axis carrying a fixed center-wheel, the movement is embedded on top of the minute hand, it fulfill the full definition of Abraham Louis Breguet’s Tourbillon.

The escapement, fitted on the exterior part of the minute hand upon the extension of the escapement wheel pinion, operates in Tourbillon with a period of 60 seconds. The Tourbillon is flying as its mobile parts are fitted on bearing without upper -bridge. All of this to make the “Two hands” flying over gravity to explore the basics of the tourbillon.

Two hands was fully crafted by L’Epée 1839, Switzerland’s only remaining specialised high-end clock manufacture, founded in 1839. The highly visible, superlatively finished in-house movement boasts an exceptional power reserve of 40 days with only one small barrel.

Hours and minutes hands are as usual used to indicate time but here it is also the main plate for the Tourbillon. The details of the finishing parts of the movement can be fully appreciated by the naked eye. The Full concept of a Flying Tourbillon can be admire and also easily understood by everyone as none of the subtle parts are hidden. This clock therefore threats observers to a fascinating visual full animation display.

Almost every component of the superlatively finished palladium (or gold depending on the chosen configuration) treated brass movement is designed and manufactured at L’Epée’s Swiss manufacture. The gears and mainspring barrels are on full display thanks to the skeletonised “Aerospace Turbine” inspired design dial and to the minute’s hands showing all the parts of the regulation of the clocks.

When conceiving The “Two hands” housing, CEO Arnaud Nicolas and Designer Christian Chabloz  set out a new reference to where no clock manufacturer had gone before, manufacturing an exceptional timepiece with 35 Kg of titanium.

Two hands is limited to 2 unique pieces ; one in massive Titanium Grade 5 (Ref. 10.2014/101)and one in massive brass gold plated (Ref.10.2014/001).

The Sphere
Several challenges had been solve to manufacture this exceptional housing. The First but not the least was, for the black and white configuration, to be able to manufacture a sphere resulting of 35 kg of massive Titanium. To push to the extreme the link between design and material, the raw material used to manufacture the housing is identical to the one used in Aerospace industry: Titanium Grade 5.

A unique dressing was also designed and, to be able to machining it on top of the sphere, not less than 2 millions of computer lines made by a specialist, resulting in more than 50 hours of grounding on a 5 axes CNC machine, was required.

As it is an anniversary piece, the link with the past had to be visible in the movement but also in the housing, so the choice of enamel was taken. This was the biggest challenges for the l’Epée team. The design of the housing is composed of 212 leaves and 167 characters. So, 379 pockets of different size, going from 0.38 mm for the smaller one to 780 mm for the biggest one, had to be enamel on a unique round surface.

The sphere shape was a huge constrains but it was one of the key codes for this anniversary piece. The base is also in Titanium and had to be as simple as possible. The L’Epée team wanted to have a clock that the owner can enjoy and despite the weight it had to be easily handled. To ease the discovery, to align the dial opening to its desk or to enjoy it from its sofa, the owner can easily turn it; thanks to the free rotation on its pedestal.

The Dial
A Contemporary guilloché dial plated with all -black associated with curved arms reveals the back side of the movement. Nothing is hidden; everything is shown in this turbine like dial.3 main-plates composed the movement. The first one and the second one have this wave shape that gives a sensation of movement to the clock. The last one is placed on the back of the movement to add some kind of deepness of infinity. The deepness of the space into which the movement is flying.

The Vincent Calabrese and L’Epée 1839 Signatures are engraved respectively at 3h00 and 9h00 to underline the 3 and 9 of 1939, date of foundation of L’Epée. The 12 numbers are sun satined finish to highlight the dial contrast and to re-enforced the turning effect. Like in a vortex, everything seems to come out from the center.

The Flying Tourbillon
A new generation of Tourbillon have been developed. This flying Tourbillon lays on top of the minute hand doing a revolution in 1 hour. The influences of gravity on the accuracy of the 40-days movement disappear over the continuous and mastered rotation of the escapement. This Tourbillon, signed by Vincent Calabrese, is a revolving system as the movement is rotating on the single axis carrying a fixed center wheel. The movement is a Double Tourbillon as the escapement is rotating within the minute hand, itself rotating in 60 minutes.

The escapement, fitted on the exterior part of the minute hand upon the extension of the escape wheel pinion, operates in Tourbillon with a period of 60 seconds. This Tourbillon is flying as its mobile parts are fitted on bearing without upper bridge. To enhance the visibility and aesthetics flying tourbillon, the team has decided to make the cage turning anti-clockwise in an atmosphere where everything is turning clockwise.

L’Epée 1839 40-days Movement
L’Epée 1839 has a long experience in 40 days movement. Nevertheless, this new movement has the particularity to only bear one Barrel and to place most of its wheels on top of the minute Hand. The wheels are driven in a continuous motion by the minute hand, while the barrel is attached to the dial of this masterpiece.

L’Epée 1839 Ovale Tourbillon

Switzerland based clock manufactory L’Epée has decided to strengthen one of the firm’s key area of expertise that has made the company famous over the years by designing and developing one of the complications most sought after by connoisseurs: a “Carrousel” type Tourbillon.

In this type of complication, the balance and spring and the escapement are housed within a carriage of which the rotation axis coincides with the centre of the escapement and performs one complete turn per minute. This finely tuned carriage contains a poising weight and its rotation is driven by the barrel via a classic gear train.

Technical details
Reference: 64.6142/001
Movement: Mechanical Caliber 1881T, 8-day, Swiss Made.
Escapement: “Carrousel” type Tourbillon with « 2 Swords » upper bridge, Revolution in 60 seconds
Functions: Tourbillon, Strike, Repeat, Moon phase, Day, Date, and Alarm Strike: Strike every Hour and Half Hour; Repeat on demand
Jewels: 15
Decoration: Gold-plated
Cabinet: Massive Brass gold plated with mineral glass
Winding: Manual, with a design key
Family: Ovale
Dimensions: 128 x 145 x 108 mm / 5” x 5 ¾” x 4 ¼”
Edition: Limited Edition of 88 pieces

L’Epée 1839 La Tour-Billon Skeleton Clock

The L’Epée 1839 La Tour-Billon skeleton clock is equipped with a spectacular Tourbillon. The “ La Tour ” collection adopts the“ Less is more” motto of the famous Bauhaus Director Ludwig Mies Van der Rohe.

On that minimalist and pure design, a very sophisticated Tourbillon device replaces the standard escapement. A closer look of that most sought Tourbillon complication is quite fascinating and displays its beauty and the “two swords” bridge that reminds us of the great history of L’Epée 1839. This special La Tour-Billon highlights the mechanical movement whose elegance is revealed through the cover glass.

Technical details

References
– 76.6588/001: Cote’s des Genève gold plated
– 76.6588/121: Cote de Genève palladium plated
– 76.6588/201: Black cote de Genève with golded wheels
– 76.6588/211: Black cote de Genève with palladium wheels

Movement
Mechanic 8-day exclusive, Swiss made
Caliber 1853 T

Escapement
-“Carrousel” type tourbillon with “2 swords” upper bridge
-Revolution in 60 Seconds
-Visible on top
Jewels: 18
Winding: Manual, with a decorative key

Functions
Tourbillon, hour and minute

Case
Metal base with transversal cut glass
Dimensions: 148 mm x 120 mm

Edition
Limited Edition of 12 pieces

L’Epée 1839 Anglaise Squelette

Unveiled at Baselworld 2014 fair, this Anglaise clock by the world renowned clock manufactory is a reproduction of an“ Anglaise” made by Couaillet Freres of Saint Nicolas D’Aliermont in 1931. L’Epée has developed this Carriage Clock with a surprising design approach. The tradition is tempered by a bold skeletonized dial. The first authentic carriage clock was made in Paris at the start of the 19th Century under the auspices of the great Abraham-Louis Breguet. Carriage clocks are also known in France as “Officer’s clocks”.

Technical details
Reference: 64.6742/021
Movement: Mechanical Caliber 1881 SK, 8-day, Swiss Made.
Strike:Strike every Hour and Half Hour; Repeat on demand
Functions: Strike, Repeat, Moonphase, Day, Date, Alarm
Jewels: 11
Collection: Anglaise
Cabinet: Massive gold plated Brass with mineral glass
Winding: Manual, with a design key.
Decoration: Gold
Dimensions: 107 x 158 x 90 mm / 4 ¼ ” x 6 ¼ ” x 3 ½ ”

MB&F Starfleet Machine (In association with L’EPEE 1839)

Founded in 1839, L’EPEE is Switzerland’s only remaining specialised high-end clock manufacture and MB&F, established in 2005, is a young luxury watch brand which is specialised in the revolutionary mechanical timepieces. This year, both companies join hands together to create Starfleet Machine, an exceptional horology creation which reflects the knowhow of the legendary clock maker and the innovative ideas of concept lab.

L’Epée’s beautifully-crafted wall clocks were chosen to furnish the cabins of legendary Concorde when the supersonic aircraft entered commercial service in 1976. Today the design team at MB&F designed a supersonically-themed L’Epée clock: Starfleet Machine.

Engineered and crafted by L’Epée 1839, Starfleet Machine is an intergalactic spaceship-cum-table clock, featuring hours and minutes, double retrograde seconds and power reserve indicator. The highly visible, superlatively finished in-house movement boasts an exceptional power reserve of 40 days Starfleet Machine has been designed by MB&F, the award-winning artistic and micro-engineering laboratory.

Hours and minutes are indicated on the central black dome by hand-polished hands that follow the dome’s curved contours. Behind that, a smaller rotating dome, accompanied by a revolving radar dish, provides an intuitive view of remaining energy: five bars indicates the movement is fully wound (40 days of power); one bar means Starfleet Machine is running low on propellant (eight days of remaining power).

Below 12 o’clock on the central hour-minute dome are the double retrograde seconds in the form of turret-mounted laser cannons. The cannons start in parallel and cross over one another before rapidly flying out again, an action marking off 20-second intervals. The red-tipped cannons provide eye-catching visual animation, and perhaps just as importantly, fend off enemy attacks against the core of the craft just underneath: the regulator, which has deliberately been placed in full view for all to admire.

One of the biggest challenges for L’Epée was respecting the movement configuration required by MB&F’s spacecraft design. L’Epée’s calibre – featuring five main spring barrels (in series for optimal performance) – usually equips vertically standing clocks, but here it is laid flat. The escapement platform also had to be set horizontally to be protected by the turret-mounted laser cannons. Naturally, the movement beats with a precision that Starfleet would be proud of, for an impressive accuracy of -2 to +2 minutes over 40 days.

Every component (except the 48 jewels) of the superlatively finished palladium-treated brass movement is designed and manufactured at L’Epée’s Swiss atelier. The gears and mainspring barrels are on full display thanks to the skeletonised mainplate and concentric C-shaped external structure in stainless steel. Starfleet Machine can rest on both ends of its vertical landing gear; useful for when turn it over to wind the mainspring and set the time.

Starfleet Machine is limited to 175 pieces and is available in ‘light’ or ‘dark’ editions, the latter with ruthenium-finished components.

Technical details
Display
Hours and minutes: Curved, hand-polished hands rotate to indicating hours and minutes on a polished, central dome. The dome features MB&F’s signature numerals.

Retrograde seconds: 20-second intervals indicated by double retrograde fly-out cannons emanating from central dome.

Power reserve indicator: a dome indicator, framed by a hand finished arc, provides an intuitive view of remaining energy as it turns 270°: 5 bars, 4 bars, 3 bars, 2 bars, 1 bar (1 bar = 8 days). Complemented by a ‘radar dish’ that also revolves 270°.

Main structure
Height: approx. 21cm
Diameter: approx. 29cm
‘Light’ version: Inner C-shaped structure, external C-shaped structure, support arcs and screws: all in stainless steel
‘Dark’ version: Inner C-shaped structure, external C-shaped structure and support arcs: ruthenium-treated stainless steel
Screws in stainless steel

Movement
L’EPÉE in-house designed and manufactured movement
Balance frequency: 18,000 vph / 2.5Hz
Barrels: 5 in series
Power reserve: 40 days
Jewels: 48
Incabloc shock protection system
Manual-winding: Double-ended key to set time and wind movement
‘Light’ version: Mechanism and main plate in palladium-treated brass
‘Dark’ version: Mechanism in palladium-treated brass, Main plate in ruthenium-treated brass

Transparent ‘biosphere’ dome
Material: polished Plexiglas
Height: approx. 25cm
Maximum diameter: approx. 50cm

L’Epée Duet – Mechanical Musical Clock created in association with Reuge

Switzerland based mechanical clock maker L’Epée and Reuge, the masters of mechanical music boxes have a true experience in mastering their own art. Now both brands join together to make  an  astounding  new masterpiece clock featuring a music box that the owner is able to enjoy every hour or on demand only .

The Duet timepiece presents a Swiss Made 40-day mechanical movement with a 72 notes music box.

Delémont based L’Epée  and Ste Croix  based Reuge are respectively the creator of clocks with undeniable know-how in the development of prestigious mechanical movements and the master of bespoke music boxes with unique know-how in the development of unsurpassed mechanical music.

The Musical Clock
This true accomplishment goes back to the origins of both companies. An inspired collaboration of commune musical work has been carried out with this exceptional “Duet” musical clock. The hour-strike complication has been upgraded with a mechanical musical movement. These melodies are now available in either the classic or soul family. World famous 12 tunes can be heard for 8 seconds on each hour or on demand.

The Mechanical movement
The caliber 2012, an adaptation of the known caliber 2010, has a strong personality with a 40 -day power reserve animated by five barrels.  The mechanical movement is paired to the amazing musical movement from Reuge.

The Music Box
A specific melody is played for 8 seconds on each new hour. The musical movement has autonomy of 40 days provided the playing is for a period of 12 hours / day. Two repertoires are presently available with either classical or soul music.

Technical details

References
50.6556/101 Duet Classic
50.6556/201 Duet Soul

Movement
Mechanical Mvt: Caliber 2012. Mechanic 40-Day, Swiss Made
Escapement:   Vertical. Visible from the front glass
Functions: Hours, Minutes, Power Reserve Indicator, Strike and Music Box
Strike: Melody. Every Hour. Play on demand
Music Box: Reuge.12.72. Nickel plated mechanical musical movement
Power reserve of 40 days if played 12 hours/day

Functions
12 melodies/ of 8 seconds each, every hour on the hour
2 different references for classic or soul tunes
Switch for On / Off / Permanent melodies

Cabinet
Brass, Palladium-coated
Glasses:  Mineral glass
Winding: One single design key for the mechanical movement and the music box
Special compartment for the key on the back of the base
Dimensions:   265 x 370 x 105 mm

DUET CLASSIC – Reference no. 50.6556/101
1. Canon – J. Pachelbel
2. The four seasons (Spring) – A. Vivaldi
3. The Magic Flute – W.A. Mozart
4. Polonaise Op.40 ‘Militär ‘- F. Chopin
5. La Traviata – G. Verdi
6. The Blue Danube – J. Strauss
7. Hungarian Dance No.5 – J. Brahms
8. Solveig’s Song (Peer Gynt – Suite 2) – E. Grieg
9. Waltz of the flowers – P.I. Tchaikovsky
10. Suite burlesque dolente – G.Tailleferre
11. Waltz No.1 (Jazz-Suite 2) – D. Chostakovitch
12. Edelweiss – R. Rodgers

DUET SOUL – Reference no. 50.6556/201
1. What a wonderful world – L. Armstrong
2. Summertime – G. Gershwin
3. Georgia on my mind – R. Charles
4. Ain’t no sunshine – Bill Withers
5. Killing me softly with his song –  Roberta Flack
6. No woman no cry- Bob Marley
7. Here comes the Sun – Nina Simone
8. I Feel Good – James Brown
9. Bridge over troubled water – Aretha franklin
10. Superstition – Stevie Wonder
11. Your Song – Billy Paul
12. Let The Music Play – Barry White

L’EPEE 1839 Le Duel Perpetuel Tourbillon

The prestigious L’Epée Clock Manufacture based in Switzerland unveils Le Duel Perpetuel Tourbillon; a horology masterpiece equipped with a 40-day mechanical movement and most sought after watch complications.

The 2 cross swords are the signature and emblem of the l’Epée brand. Therefore in Le Duel collection, the presented complications are resolved at the tip of the sword. In fencing, the symbolism of swords that cross is highlighted by the “En garde” high position at the beginning of the fight and the “Surrender” bottom position at the end of the duel.

The Power-Reserve Indicator can be seen below 6 o’clock. It is at its peak when the two swords cross to form the logo of the brand. When they separate, the angle between the swords opens gradually and after 40 days of autonomy. The logo has been reversed and the 2 swords are pointing down.

At 12 o’clock is the animation of the Double Retrograde Second. The 2 swords keep pace with the seconds: they cross swords and depart over a period of 20 seconds to bounce back to the “En garde” position.

The in line Perpetual Calendar indicates the Day, Date, Month and Year. The display of the calendar is done through 6 jumping discs. The energy is accumulated by a mechanical system throughout the day and then this energy is released at midnight allowing discs to jump from one indication to another instantly. The calendar is therefore leaping forward. When the clock is stopped for some reason, setting the calendar is done at the same time as the time setting. If it is necessary to go back, there is no need to stop the clock. The adjustment in reverse is possible and the discs are sliding backwards. The system Day, Date, Month and Year does not get out of sync even when going into reverse from January 1 to December 31 or in leap years. This is particularly rare and unusual for this type of complication.

In addition to the above mentioned three complications, this timepiece is also equipped with a tourbillon escapement. The balance and the escapement are mounted in a small mobile cage which revolves once a minute. The spectacular “two swords” bridge reminds us of the great history of L’Epée. This masterpiece, with its limited edition of 88 numbered pieces is the living proof that l’Epée has been pursuing since 1839 its long tradition of horological innovations.

Technical details
Model:« Le Duel Perpetuel Tourbillon »
Reference: 50.6593/201

Movement: Exclusive mechanical movement with 40 days power reserve, 70-jewel, Swiss Made Tourbillon device: Visible at the top of the clock under a “two swords” bridge, Caliber: 2010T
Functions: Hour- Minutes, Double Retrograde Second, Power-Reserve Indicator, Perpetual Calendar and Tourbillon
Decoration: « Côtes de Genève » decor
Cabinet: Aluminium base with a « soft touch » black varnish, mineral glass cap with metal frame
Rewinding: Manual with a modern design key
Dimensions: 220 x 276 x 110 mm- 8 5/8” x 10 7/8” x 4 3/8”
Edition: Limited Edition of 88 numbered pieces
Public price: 125 000 Swiss Francs

L’EPEE 1839 Le Duel Perpétuel

The two crossed swords are the signature and emblem of the L’Epée brand. This famous duel is now welcoming a noble perpetual calendar model. Three jumping discs at the lower end of the clock indicate the day, date, month and year. The power reserve corresponds as ever to the two swords which change angle according to the remaining level of autonomy.

A second duel takes place at 12 o’clock and offers a fabulous spectacle of two swords following the rhythm of the seconds and clashing every 20 seconds. 12-piece limited edition.

Technical details

Movement
Hand-wound with decorative key, 2010 calibre, palladium-plated with “Côtes de Genève” motifs, escapement visible through the top, 70 jewels, 40-day power reserve

Functions
Hours, minutes, double retrograde seconds, perpetual calendar (day, date, month and year) and power reserve

Case
Aluminium base with “soft touch” black varnish, 220 x 276 x 110 mm
Metal-rimmed mineral glass cabinet

L’EPEE 1839 Les Heures Parisiennes

With the Heures Parisiennes, L’Epée once again sets a spectacular stage for time. With its beautifully rounded cabinet and pivoting bezel, this avant-garde clock will appeal to those with a penchant for distinctive designs.

The new mechanical eight-day “Mouvement de Paris” calibre marks off the hours and half-hours with a subtle chime thanks to its integrated bell. The pure and timeless aesthetic is heightened by the openwork black dial revealing the calibre with its palladium-coated and polished finishes. 50-piece limited edition.

Technical details

Movement
Hand-wound with black decorative key, exclusive “Mouvement de Paris” 1910 calibre, 11 jewels, horizontal escapement, 8-day power reserve

Functions
Hours, minutes and mechanism striking the hours and half-hours

Case
217 x 200 x 110 mm
Satin-brushed aluminium
Pivoting bezel
Mineral glass

L’Epee Vénitienne Collection

This historical collection is named in honour of Venetian goldsmiths who contributed to ensuring the aesthetic elegance of this refined model.

Technical details

  • Movement: Mechanical 8-day, Swiss made
  • Function: Striking mechanism, repeater, alarm, day, date, moon phases, small seconds at 12 o’clock
  • Cabinet : Solid brass, hand-polished and coated with a protective lacquer
  • Dial: White, Roman numerals
  • Dimensions : 184 x 95 x 108 mm / 7 ¼ x 3 ¾ x 4 ¼ “