Andreas Strehler Trans-axial® Remontoir Tourbillon

Independent Swiss master watchmaker Andreas Strehler has developed a new movement which combines his Remontoir d’égalité (constant force) with a Tourbillon.

In Andreas Strehler watches, the energy for operating the movement is stored in twin mainspring barrels. The running down of the two mainsprings is limited by an epicyclical gear. Only the optimal part of each mainspring is used where the power supplied is practically constant.

Even by using the highest-grade lubricants and the tightest tolerances in manufacturing each component, the flow of energy from the mainsprings will be subject to variations. Changes in temperature or in the position of the watch will cause such variations. To filter these variations, Andreas Strehler employs a Remontoir d’égalité or constant force escapement.

In Andres Strehler’s Remontoir d’égalité,t he energy supplied from the twin mainspring barrels through the gear train is accumulated in a spring, acting on a satellite arm held in position by the star wheel (the satellite). One tooth of this star wheel is resting on the palette-stone of the palette arm.

This palette arm constantly moves ahead. Every second, the palette arm releases the star wheel. The star wheel turns by one tooth and the satellite arm jumps ahead by 6°. The satellite wheel then rests again against the palette-stone and the cycle starts anew.

When moving ahead by 6°, the satellite arm recharges the spring which drives the escapement. The amount of energy transferred to the escapement thus is always the same, it is constant. The energy is transferred to the escapement through an axis.

The escapement mounted on this axis is a Tourbillon. The Tourbillon is a special escapement. It is also one of the most complicated components known to watchmaking. In a Tourbillon, the whole escapement including the balance rotates typically once a minute.

The idea behind the Tourbillon is that the balance, despite its name, is never perfectly balanced. This means that it oscillates slightly differently, depending on its position in space.

When the Tourbillon was invented by Abraham Louis Breguet in 1801, men wore pocket watches. A pocket watch is carried vertically, and the balance always oscillates on a horizontal axis. This means that gravity pulls more on any part of the balance which is thicker or heavier.

Andreas Strehler Trans-axial® Remontoir Tourbillon

Now, by rotating the whole escapement and hence the balance once a minute, it did not matter if the balance was slightly imperfect: Gravity would still pull heavier on the thicker part of the balance. But, by its rotation, this effect would even itself out.

The balance would, for one part of the rotation of the Tourbillon, work uphill, so to speak. But for the other part of the rotation of the Tourbillon, it would work downhill (and for the rest of the time in neutral).

Andreas Strehler Trans-axial® Remontoir Tourbillon

In his quest for perfection, Andreas Strehler has designed, constructed and built a movement where internal influences on the already pretty linear power supply from the epicyclically limited twin mainspring barrels is filtered through a Remontoir d’égalité and transferred to a Tourbillon escapement mounted on the same axis to eliminate the influence of gravity on the escapement.

Andreas Strehler Trans-axial® Remontoir Tourbillon

The Trans-axial® Remontoir Tourbillon escapement is hand wound, using Andreas Strehler’s own true conical gear wheels.

Andreas Strehler Trans-axial® Remontoir Tourbillon

To show the power left in the two mainspring barrels, the movement has a power reserve indication using an extremely small differential gear, another speciality of Andreas Strehler.

The Remontoir d’égalitéis mounted on three roller bearings and powers a separate jumping seconds indication. The Tourbillon is held in position by two gold chatons.

Andreas Strehler Trans-axial® Remontoir Tourbillon

Technical details

Trans-axial Remontoir Tourbillon

  • Impulse: Double main spring barrel, energy regulated by a remontoir d’égalité
  • Plates and bridges: Three 18k gold bridges, Central Main Plate and bridges are decorated to the highest standards, edges bevelled and polished by hand, fully decorated movement
  • Escapement: swiss lever escapement designed by Andreas Strehler
  • Regulating system: Free-Sprung balance with Breguet overcoil and eight adjustment screws
  • Frequency: 3 Hz / 21’600 A/h
  • Number of jewels: 37, 3 gold chatons
  • Number of individual parts: 250
  • Size: 32.0 x 30.0 mm
  • Height: 7.01 mm (without Tourbillon)
  • Power reserve: 78 h, limited by a differential stop works
  • Functions: Hour, minute, small jumping second, constant force, Tourbillon, power reserve indication (micro differential gear train)
  • Winding-mechanism: Hand winding with conical gear wheels
  • Speciality: Constant force Tourbillon, Remontoir trans-axial underneath the Tourbillon, special roller bearing for the remontoir.

ANDREAS STREHLER

Andreas Strehler is an independent watchmaker based in Sirnach, the German speaking part of Switzerland. Andreas Strehler designs, constructs and manufactures his movements in his own workshop with the help of a small and dedicated workforce.

He also develops and constructs many of the tools and machines he uses himself. Through UhrTeil SA, his movement production business, he develops, designs and manufactures movements for other brands.

Born in 1971, Andreas Strehler discovered his love of mechanics and watch making at an age when other children were still playing.

Andreas Strehler
Andreas Strehler

Andreas Strehler eventually started learning the profession of watchmaker in Frauenfeld in 1987. After completing his training in 1991, he worked for four years as the head of prototype development with Renaud et Papi, where he gathered wide experience in the development and construction of complicated machinery. And in 1995 he set up business as a self-employed watchmaker, concentrating of the restoration of antique watches.

Over the next few years, Andreas Strehler used the experience he had gathered to create a number of unusual timepieces. And more and more watch-lovers wanting their own individual watch turned to him to realize their dream. And so it happened that year after year he created a series of individual watches which met the exact demands of his customers who, in Andreas Strehler, found a watchmaker with a dedication to detail and perfection and the ability to fulfill their wishes.

Andreas Strehler Desk Calender, 1998
Andreas Strehler Desk Calendar, 1998

Besides that, Andreas Strehler continued to present unusual timepieces which captured the imagination of the watchmaking world. In 1998 his Perpetual Calendar represented a new version, a new interpretation, of Abraham Louis Breguet’s Sympathique.

Andreas Strehler Zwei Pocket watch, 1999
Andreas Strehler Zwei Pocket watch, 1999

In the same year he patented a time-display switch with push-button operation. The following year saw the presentation of the corresponding pocket-watch Zwei (Two).

Andreas Strehler Zwei Pocket watch, 1999
Zwei Movement

Andreas Strehler also turned his attention to the use of new materials in watch construction. He introduced the compensating carbon balance-wheel which he patented in the year 2000. The Chronoscope, which Andreas Strehler developed for Chronoswiss in 2003, was elected Watch of the Year.

Besides developing and producing his own watches, Andreas Strehler continued to construct movements for other famous brands. His cooperation with H. Moser & Cie began in the year 2003 and led to the creation of the Moser Perpetual which won first place at the Grand Prix de Horlogerie de Geneve for the firm in the complication category .

In 2006 he developed Le Chronographe for Maurice Lacroix, their first in house movement. And in 2007 the Opus 7 appeared in cooperation with Harry Winston.

Harry Winston Opus 7
Harry Winston Opus 7

In 2005 Andreas Strehler founded his own development centre, UhrTeil AG, which enabled him to attain the greatest possible scope of manufacturing precision.

As a result, today Andreas Strehler is not only an extraordinarily gifted developer and constructor with a high reputation for reliability, but also an entrepreneur who is able to develop almost all component parts for watches and to manufacture them in his own UhrTeil AG. What’s more, if a machine required for their manufacture does not exist, he develops one himself.

The models Papillon (2008) and Cocon (2012) are examples of Andreas Strehler’s philosophy of the perfect minimalisation of a movement as a living organism, giving a new interpretation to the traditions of the watchmaker’s craft.

In 2013, Andreas Strehler received the Prix Gaïa in the category Artisanat-Création for his ingenious, minimalistic mechanical movements which are conceived like true living organisms.

Timeline

  • Born January 1971

  • 1987-1991: watchmaker apprenticeship at a workshop in Frauenfeld, Switzerland and classes at the Watch makers School in Solothurn.

  • 1995: independent Watchmaker, restoring antique clocks and watches.  4 Years at Renaud et Papi as head of prototypes and training in watch engineering.

  • 1998: First exhibition at BaselWorld with the “Perpetual Calendar” – the first watch with a mechanical memory – a new interpretation of A. L. Breguet’s Sympathique.

  • 1998: Patent no. CH693155 for switching indications

  • 1999: “Zwei” the first mechanical pocket watch with switching indications

  • 2000: Patent for a compensating carbon balance CH695174

  • 2001: Zwei, first mechanical wrist watch with switching indications

  • 2002: Chronoscope movement for Chronoswiss (Watch of the Year 2003)

  • 2003: Development, design and engineering of their movements for H. Moser & Cie

  • 2005: Foundation of UhrTeil AG an engineering firm and also the manufacture for  Andreas Strehler watches and movements, prototypes and parts for other brands

  • 2006: Le Chronographe the first manufacture calibre Maurice Lacroix

  • 2007: Move to the new workshop in Sirnach, Switzerland

  • 2007: Creation of the Opus7 for Harry Winston, based on the Andreas Strehler’s  patent no. CH693155

  • 2008: Creation of the Papillon the combination of Watchmaking and elegance

  • 2012: Creation of the Cocon

  • 2013: Creation of the Sauterelle, Prix Gaïa Artisanat-Création

  • 2014: Unveiling of the Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M watch

  • 2015: Launches the Papillon d’Or watch

  • 2016: Creation of the Lune Exacte and the Time Shadow watches

  • 2017: Introduction of the Sauterelle à Heure Mondiale

  • 2018: Creation of Trans-axial® Remontoir Tourbillon

[Visit Andreas Strehler watch gallery]

Contact details
http://www.astrehler.ch

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Heure Mondiale

Presented at Baselworld 2017, Andreas Strehler‘s Sauterelle à heure mondiale wristwatch follows the footsteps of the award-winning Swiss master watchmaker’s complication timepieces such as Sauterelle à lune perpétuelle and Lune exacte.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Heure Mondiale

In 2014, Andreas Strehler presented the Sauterelle à lune perpétuelle with phase of the moon indication with a precision of one day in 14,189 years. This is by far the most precise phase of the moon.

In 2015, Andreas Strehler launched the Sauterelle à lune perpétuelle 2M with a phase of the moon indication with a deviation of one day in two million years (to be precise: 2,066,757 years), a Guinness World Record.

Last year, Andreas Strehler introduced the Lune exacte with its patent pending high precision moon age indication, indicating the age of the moon correct to three hours. This indication was combined with the two million years’ moon phase. After having said the final word on precise moon phase indications, Andreas Strehler is now introducing the new Sauterelle à heure mondiale watch.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Heure Mondiale
The Sauterelle à heure mondiale, being a Sauterelle, has the patented Andreas Strehler remontoir  d’égalité at 10 o’clock.

At 8 o’clock on the dial, there is a three-dimensional view of the northern hemisphere as seen from above the North Pole, rotating counter clockwise once in 24 hours, as the earth does.  This is where the phase of the moon indication used to be. This earth on the dial rotates under Andreas Strehler’s familiar sapphire crystal minute ring which here indicates night on earth.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Heure Mondiale watch with engine turned blue dial

On the movement side of the watch, there is a ring with 24 names of individual cities, representing the 24 time zones. In the centre of this ring, there is a blue steel arrow.

Winding an Andreas Strehler watch is a very pleasing experience thanks to true conical gear wheels in the winding mechanism. The movement starts to work and the remontoir d’égalité coming into action, charging the escapement every second with the exact same amount of energy and indicating the seconds.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Heure Mondiale case back view

Continue winding the watch until the twin mainspring barrels, linked by a differential gear, are fully wound. Due to the special Andreas Strehler stop works, limiting the mainsprings to their sector of linear energy discharge, this moment is distinctly felt.

Before your journey begins and to synchronise the watch, just turn the watch around and pull the crown to the first position. You then set the blue arrow to London/GMT. Then, while looking at the dial again, pull the crown to the second position and set the hands and the earth to the correct time for GMT, the earth serving as 24 hour and day/night indicator.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Heure Mondiale watch with silver dial

GMT is now your reference time and you are ready for take-off.  With the crown pulled to the first position, the hour hand can be set in one hour-steps independently from the minute hand and without stopping the movement.

Simultaneously, the hand in the middle of the destination-disk at the back of the movement is moved to the correct time zone, also indicating the relevant GMT offset. GMT and day/night at Greenwich always remains visible at a glance on the dial.

Technical details

Model: Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Heure Mondiale

Movement
Sauterelle à heure mondiale
Impulse: Double main spring barrel, energy regulated by a patented remontoir d’égalité
Plates and bridges: Central Main Plate and bridges are decorated to the highest standards; edges bevelled and polished by hand, fully decorated movement
Escapement: Andreas Strehler escapement
Regulating system: Free-Sprung balance with Breguet overcoil and four adjustment screws
Frequency: 3 Hz / 21’600 A/h Number of jewels: 25
Number of individual parts: 206
Size: 32.0 x 30.0 mm Height: 7.20 mm
Power reserve: 78 h, limited by a differential stop works

Case
Stainless steel, 41.00 x 37.30 mm (43.40 x 47.20 mm including the crown and lugs)

Dial
Silver, sapphire chapter ring
Hands: Polished blued steel

Functions
Hour, minute, small second, GMT, Destination Time
Optional: phase of the moon indication with a deviation of one day in 2 million years (blued steel disk, Moons: 18K Gold)
Winding-mechanism: Hand winding with conical gear wheels
Crown: Tree positions, 0=winding, 1=destination time (local time), 2=hand setting

Retail Price excluding VAT
CHF 125,000

Andreas Strehler Time Shadow Limited Edition

For his eighth movement to appear in a watch bearing his name, Andreas Strehler has designed a watch limited to eight pieces. The indication of the watch is reduced to the two basic indications of hours and minutes, but with a twist.

The hours are indicated by a black rotating disk, black like the eight ball in the eponymous pool billiards game. This hour disk, finished in wire-cut, turns around a small disk displaying the typical Andreas Strehler butterfly logo.

Andreas Strehler Time Shadow Limited Edition watch

The actual hour is shown by the cut-out numeral which wanders over a luminous orange dot. This disk is in fact a large gear wheel, linked to the visible gear wheel of the minute hand. The minute hand also has two luminous inlays.

Andreas Strehler Time Shadow Limited Edition watch

Once the minute hand leaves its main minute scale, the minutes can be read precisely from the short part of the minute hand on a smaller secondary minute scale. The minute hand wheel thus directly drives the hour disk. The two gear wheels together form a lying eight which is the mathematical sign for infinity.

Andreas Strehler Time Shadow Limited Edition watch

The movement, as usual specifically designed for the watch, is finished in grainage, the edges of the figure eight shaped bridge with its eight corners are hand-bevelled and are polished by hand.

Its 5/8-bridge is designed to emphasise several specific features of Andreas Strehler’s watches: The escapement designed by Andreas Strehler, the true conical gear wheels of the winding mechanism and the large, elegant second wheel.

Andreas Strehler Time Shadow Limited Edition watch movement case back view

The rarely found grainage-finishing of the main bridge with its fine and rich texture is difficult do adequately reproduce by photography. At the same time technical and warm, it represents the solidity of the construction without taking away from the fineness of handcrafted watchmaking.

This surface is difficult to achieve and no mistakes or scratches can be re-polished. The dial of the Andreas Strehler Time Shadow is finished in matt grey, so called black or, to correspond with the grainage main bridge of the movement.

Andreas Strehler Time Shadow Limited Edition watch

For the first time, Andreas Strehler has used stainless steel for a case to match the more technical aspect of the dial.

As this movement is also the eighth movement Andreas Strehler has designed and developed for his own line of watches, the Time Shadow is limited to eight pieces.

Technical details

Model: Andreas Strehler Time Shadow Limited Edition

Movement
Calibre Time Shadow
Hand winding, 132 parts, frequency 3 Hz / 21‘600 A/h, 32.0 x 30.0 mm, height 5.9 mm, 20 jewels, double main spring barrel, edges bevelled and polished by hand, decorated movement with 5/8 bridge

Case
Stainless steel, 41.00 x 37.30 mm (43.40 x 47.20 mm including the crown and lugs)

Dial
Matt grey (blackor), Hands: polished stainless steel

Strap
Hand-sewn alligator leather strap
Buckle: Made from stainless steel, matching the case

Retail price
CHF 56,000 (excluding VAT)

Andreas Strehler Lune Exacte

With this new timepiece by independent Swiss master watchmaker Andreas Strehler, the most precise phase of the moon display can now be set and read extremely accurately. The Lune Exacte watch is available in 18-carat red gold and platinum versions.

Andreas Strehler Lune Exacte red gold and platinum versions

Precise phase of the moon indications deviate from the synodic or mean moon by one day after a couple of hundred years; Andreas Strehler’s phase of the moon after two million years. This has won the Sauterelle à lune perpetuelle 2M an entry in the Guinness Book of World Records.

However, all phase of the moon indications have a common problem: As precise as they may be, they cannot be read very precisely: Except at new moon and at full moon, the wearer of the watch has to guess what the exact phase or age of the moon is. Also the exact setting of the moon phase indication is only possible at new moon and full moon.

Andreas Strehler Lune Exacte watch red gold

Andreas Strehler has changed this with the first precise phase of the moon indication. The Lune exacte can be read and set correct to three hours at any time and not only every fortnight, thanks to its new and patent pending mechanism. This high precision moon age indication gives the age of the moon in days and further increments of three hours.

Andreas Strehler Lune Exacte watch

The age of the moon was already of importance for the Maya civilisation and is still observed in many cultures. In China, a conception calendar is still being used today which is based on the age of the moon.

Andreas Strehler Lune Exacte watch red gold version

Moon Vernier Scale

On the dial of the watch, there is a conventional phase of the moon indication and the additional age of the moon indication with its moon vernier scale at six o’clock.

On this high precision moon age scale, a red arrow indicates the age of the moon in days. Two red marks on the scale indicate new moon and full moon. A vernier scale on the inner vernier ring increases the accuracy of the indication to three hours.

Andreas Strehler Lune Exacte watch Moon Vernier Scale

Using the moon vernier is straightforward:-

  • The red arrow indicated the age of the moon in days.
  • If the arrow points to a number in the blue sector of the outer scale, the accurate value is alsoread from the blue sector of the inner vernier ring. The age of the moon accurate to three hours is indicated where the next mark on the vernier ring aligns with a mark on the outer ring.
  • These hours are added to the days indicated on the outer ring.

In the same way, if the red arrow indicates a day on the yellow sector of the outer scale, the hours are also read from the yellow sector on the vernier scale. A patent is pending for this moon vernier scale.

Patented remontoir d’égalité

In addition to the patent pending moon age indication, the Lune exacte also has Andreas Strehler’s patented remontoir d’égalité, first presented in the Sauterelle.

Conventionally, a complication known as force constante (constant force) acts on the escape-wheel. However, this is the point in the whole movement where the least torque is present.

For this reason, Andreas Strehler’s remontoir d’égalité is attached to the seconds wheel or fourth wheel. Every second the visible satellite gear provides exactly the same amount of energy to the seconds wheel and at the same time displays the seconds as dead-beat seconds.

Andreas Strehler Lune Exacte watch movement case back view

The energy is accumulated by a star-shaped satellite through a spring which is re-loaded every second. Then, the satellite wheel is released and transfers its energy to the balance. The satellite wheel then rests again against the palette-stone. This planetary design of the respective wheels is a first in a wristwatch.

This solution has the advantage that the complete escapement including the escapement wheel oscillates free from any influence between the individual impulses delivered by the remontoir d’égalité. Hence, the Swiss Anker Escapement performs without influence from the remontoir d’égalité, with its precision perfected over the last 200 years.

Fluctuations in the energy supply as well as flaws in the functioning of the gear train (uneven working of the mainspring, the gear train or the motion-work of the hands) are filtered and equalised by the remontoir d’égalité.

In contrast to a force constante and its fixed division ratio, which demands a frequency of 18.000 A/h, the Remontoir d’égalité can be used with any frequency. The Sauterelle therefore has a frequency of 21.600 A/h which leads to higher precision.

All watches made by Andreas Strehler show an almost linear force path as the running down of the two mainsprings is limited by a epicyclic gear. Only the optimal part of each mainspring is used where the thrust produced is constant.

With the Remontoir d’égalité, Andreas Strehler concentrates on the elimination of external factors such as temperature. Even minor changes in temperature influences the viscosity of the lubricants used in the mainspring barrels and consequently the even running down of the mainsprings.

With the Remontoir d’égalité, Andreas Strehler presents a mechanical solution which filters almost all technical and mechanical influences on the escapement.

Technical details

Movement
Calibre Sauterelle Lune Exacte, hand winding, 184 parts, frequency 3 Hz / 21‘600 A/h, 32.0 x 30.0 mm, height 5.9 mm, 25 jewels, patented remontoir d‘égalité, double main spring barrel, edges bevelled and polished by hand, fully decorated movement.

Case
Platinum or 18 K red gold 5N

Dial
Silver dial with gray coating and rotating vernier scale
Blue steel hands with SuperLuminova

Strap
Hand-sewn alligator leather strap, buckle made from platinum or 18K red gold, matching the case

Retail price (excluding VAT)
Red Gold version: CHF 112,000
Platinum version: CHF 125,000

Michael Philip Horlbeck and Alexander Krausz release their new book on independent watchmaker Andreas Strehler

On the occasion of Andreas Strehler’s 20 years as an independent watchmaker, authors Michael Philip Horlbeck and Alexander Krausz presented their new book on Andreas Strehler at Baselworld 2015, on the stand of the AHCI.

Name of the book is “Andreas Strehler – Engineer for the Brands – Watchmaker for the Few”

According to the authors, Andreas Strehler who modestly calls himself watchmaker is in fact one of the modern era’s leading designing engineers of watch movements. As an independent movement designer, he has worked for a variety of watch companies and also makes his own remarkable watches.

Andreas Strehler - Engineer for the Brands – Watchmaker for the Few

The book tells the story of Andreas Strehler’s early years, his creations up to present and gives an insight into his philosophy of watchmaking. Interspersed with many technical drawings and photographs, Andreas Strehler’s inventions and elegant technical solutions are explained in detail.

The authors also give insight into Andreas Strehler’s workshop and discuss what to look for in an haute horlogerie watch. The book will be available in bookshops, on the publisher’s website (www.uhrenliteraturshop.de) and directly from Andreas Strehler.

More details

Title: Andreas Strehler – Engineer for the Brands – Watchmaker for the Few

  • Authors: Michael Philip Horlbeck / Alexander Krausz
  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Verlag Historische Uhrenbücher, Berlin
  • Language: English
  • ISBN 978-3-941539-89-1
  • Dimensions: 23 x 21 cm
  • Price: CHF / EUR 52.00 incl. Swiss VAT, plus postage and packaging

Andreas Strehler Papillon d’Or

Designed and manufactured by Andreas Strehler in his workshop in Sirnach, Switzerland, the Papillon d’Oris the successor to the Papillon, which was presented in 2007. Like on the Papillon, also on the Papillon d’Or, the Andreas Strehler trademark butterfly-bridge takes centre stage in an open movement with two large sapphire crystal gear wheels.

The Papillion d’Or has been created to celebrate Andreas Strehler’s 20th anniversary as an independent watchmaker. This model is available in Platinum and 5N Red gold versions.

Andreas Strehler Papillon d'Or

A large solid gold bridge in the form of a butterfly holds the superbly finished gear train with its two transparent sapphire crystal gear wheels supports the white fired silver dial ring.

On the back of the Papillion d’Or, the power of reserve is indicated. This looks like a simple hand on a simple scale. But in fact it incorporates what is probably the world’s smallest differential gear. This, of course, is built with Andreas Strehler’s own true conical gear wheels.

Andreas Strehler Papillon d'Or

The Papillon d’Or is a hand wound watch. It needs winding after 78 hours and Papillon d’Or features a power reserve indication on its back.

Andreas Strehler Papillon d'Or

A scale divided into ten segments shows the power left in the two mainspring barrels, linked with each other by a differential gear. Hence, one segment is equal to 10 percent of power. If the two mainsprings are wound down to the end of their linear supply of power and before the power irregularly decreases, the movement is stopped by a stop-works.

Andreas Strehler Papillon d'Or

The hand indicating the power reserve is mounted on the balance-cock. The power reserve hand thus is in its logical place, as the balance only oscillates as long as there is power from the two mainspring barrels to keep it moving.

However, what looks so obvious is in fact anything but: To place the power reserve hand on the balance-cock was only possible by using components which are very small even by watchmaking standards such as a micro differential gear.

Andreas Strehler Papillon d'Or

The butterfly has always been the visible leitmotiv of Andreas Strehler’s watchmaking. In the Papillon d’Or, it is evident in the solid gold bridge forming the central element of the movement.

Less visible but equally one of the trademark features of Andreas Strehler’s watches is the use of true conical gear wheels and of differential gears. For the clever use of these, Andreas Strehler is famous among his peers and his customers in the watch industry alike.

In the Papillon d’Or, true conical gear wheels most visibly are used in the winding mechanism. They guarantee as smooth winding operation with practically no wear. Invisibly, true conical wheels are used in the power of reserve indication. This mechanism consists of what must be the smallest differential gear used in a watch.

Andreas Strehler Papillon d'Or

In watchmaking, finissage, or finishing in English, means the final treatment of each component of a watch movement. The bridges, wheels and even screws are treated with various methods to make them look perfect and to bring out the beauty of the movement.

Originally, in the days when movements and their components were entirely made and assembled by hand, finishing also served the purpose of covering the traces left by the hands, files and screwdrivers of the watchmakers when they made the parts and assembled the watch.

Andreas Strehler Papillon d'Or

Until a few years ago, finishing was invisible. It was invisible to all but to the watchmakers who opened the metal case of the watch to service or repair the movement. Thus, finishing was also a message from one watchmaker to the next, telling about the care and diligence in making the movement.

Today, finishing is form of art and an expression of respect of the watchmaker for the tradition of his craft. At Andreas Strehler, the edges of all brides are bevelled and polished by hand. This is a lengthy and difficult process. It can only properly be done by hand.

Where two edges meet at an acute or inward angle, bevelling and polishing becomes even more difficult. Even the great watch manufacturers dare not reach these angles. Andreas Strehler does. And he does not round corners.

Technical details

Model: Papillon d’Or

Case
Platinum or 18 K red gold (colour: 5N)

Dial
Massive silver dial ring
Hands: Blue steel

Strap
Hand-sewn alligator leather strap, buckle made from platinum or 18 K red gold, matching the case

Movement
hand winding: 162 parts, frequency 3Hz / 21’600 A/h, 32.0 x 30.0 mm, height 5.9 mm, 27 jewels, double main spring barrel, micro-differential gear train for the power reserve, two sapphire gear wheels, massive gold Papillon bridge, edges bevelled and polished by hand, fully decorated movement.

Retail price (excluding VAT)
Red Gold version: CHF 108,000
Platinum version: CHF 123, 000

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M – The Most Precise Lunar Phase Wrist Watch

Unveiled at Salon QP Exhibition 2014 in London, the Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M by Andreas Strehler is the most precise moonphase wristwatch ever built. This extra-ordinary mechanical timepiece is available in 18 carat red gold and platinum versions.

At Basel World 2014, the award winning master watchmaker Andreas Strehler presented his Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle with a practically perpetual indication of the phase of the moon. Now, he has built an even better moon phase: the Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M - The Most Precise Lunar Phase Wrist Watch

The phases of the moon have always fascinated mankind. Luna in Latin and still feminine in many languages, the moon governs the tides, sowing and harvesting.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M  watch in Platinum

Unfortunately, the lunar phase cycle is it is not in sync with our calendar: On average, it is 29.530588 days. Hence, for a precise phase of the moon, watchmakers would need cog wheels with fractions of teeth – which doesn’t look good and doesn’t work either.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M - The Most Precise Lunar Phase Wrist Watch

If the Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle had to be corrected every 14’189.5383 yeas by one day, Andreas Strehler managed to improve this value significantly: The Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M needs such a correction only every two million years – hence the designation 2M. To be quite precise, the correction is needed every 2’060’757 years.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M  watch in Platinum

Based on calculations made by Professor Robert Baggenstos, Andreas Strehler designed a completely new gear train for the 2M. Professor Baggenstos has calculated the ratio and Andreas Strehler has turned these calculations into a gear train. For this, the available space inside the movement had to be reallocated and the position of the balance had to be adapted.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M watch red gold

All this was done while the size and design of the present Lune Perpétuelle remained unchanged.  In spite of the improved precision of the moon phase indication, Andreas Strehler managed to keep the number of components the same.

Like the Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle watch presented in Basel earlier this year, the Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M only needs four components to achieve this feat.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M - The Most Precise Lunar Phase Wrist Watch

The Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M by Andreas Strehler is therefore the most precise phase of the moon ever built. And by some margin: About 2.045 million years. This timepiece has also won the Guinness world records as the most precise lunar phase wristwatch.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M - The Most Precise Lunar Phase Wrist Watch

Technically, the Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M is based on the Sauterelle watch by Andreas Strehler. Like the Sauterelle, the 2M has Andreas Strehler’s unique Remontoir d’égalité. This provides a constant supply of energy to the escapement.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M - The Most Precise Lunar Phase Wrist Watch movement

The Lune Perpetuelle 2M is a further example of Andreas Strehler’s technically mature constructions. Using only four components, Andreas Strehler achieves the precision of his moon phase indication by driving it continuously instead of switching it forward once a day.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M  watch in Platinum

By a clever combination of internal and external toothing as well as by the use of prime numbers for the numbers of teeth in the cogwheels, Andreas Strehler could represent complex fractions by cogwheels having integral numbers (halve a tooth on a cogwheel does not work in horology – or in general, for that matter).

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M  watch in Platinum

All this leads to the unprecedented precision of the moon phase indication of the Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M.

Technical details

Model: Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle 2M

Movement
Calibre Sauterelle Lune 2M, hand winding, 162 parts, frequency 3 Hz / 21‘600 A/h, 32.0 x 30.0 mm, height 5.9 mm, 25 jewels, patented
remontoir d‘égalité, double main spring barrel, edges bevelled and polished by hand, fully decorated movement

Case
18K red gold 5N/ Platinum

Dial
Massive silver dial
Sapphire rim
Blue steel or gold hands

Strap
Hand-sewn alligator leather strap
Buckle: 18K red gold 5N/Platinum

Retail price
Red Gold version: CHF 98,000 (excluding VAT)
Platinum version: CHF 113,000 (excluding VAT)

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune Perpétuelle

Andreas Strehler, the award winning master watch maker based in Sirnach, Switzerland has announced his presence at the prestigious Baselworld watch fair with his new masterpiece timepiece.

Developed and manufactured by Andreas Strehler, the Sauterelle à Lune perpétuelle is an exceptional mechanical timepiece that boasts a perpetual display of the phase of the moon.

Realised with only four components, the Lune perpétuelle’s phase of the moon mechanism requires occasional adjustment once in every 14’189.5383 years.

Moreover is the most precise phase of the moon ever built with a precision up to 11’000 to 14’000 years. These achievements are verified by Robert Baggenstos, renowned specialist for astronomical gears and professor for mathematics and Astronomy.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune Perpétuelle watch

The Lune perpétuelle is based on the Sauterelle model presented in 2013 and features Andreas Strehler’s unique Remontoir d’égalité, delivering a constant supply of energy to the escapement.

According to Andreas Strehler’s concept of options, the client can also order the phase of the moon function based on the Cocon, another masterpiece from watch maker. This option will also be available for future models.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle à Lune Perpétuelle

Implemented using only four components, Andreas Strehler’s phase of the moon mechanism achieves its precision partly because it is continuously moving, driven by the gear train. Conventional phase of the moon mechanisms are only moved forward once a day.

Further, the clever combination of inner and outer toothing as well as the use of prime numbers for the number of teeth makes it possible to mechanically achieve complex fractions with an integral number of teeth. This leads to the high precision of the phase of the moon mechanism.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle

In his Sauterelle model, for the first time in a wristwatch, master watch maker Andreas Strehler offers a mechanical solution which filters nearly all technical and mechanical factors impeding the escapement. The constant and linear supply of energy to the balance is the ideal in watchmaking. It is the basis for precision.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle watch

Conventionally, the complication known in watchmaking as force constante is mounted on the escapement wheel. However, this is the point of least torque in the whole movement. By contrast, Andreas Strehler has placed his remontoir d’égalité on the seconds wheel. Every second, the visible satellite gear supplies the escapement wheel with exactly the same amount of energy.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle watch force constant mechanism

At the same time, the deadbeat or jumping seconds are indicated. The energy is accumulated in the course of every second by a star shaped satellite through the tensioning of a hairspring.

The mechanism is then released, the balance receives the energy stored in the hairspring and the satellite wheel again rests against the stopping jewel. This solution has the advantage that the complete escapement, including the escapement wheel, moves freely between two impulses, uninfluenced by the movement.

The remontoir d’égalité therefore leaves the Swiss anchor escapement unimpeded; an escapement type perfected over a period of more than 200 years. With the remontoir d’égalité, Andreas Strehler concentrates on the elimination of outside factors: Fluctuations in the supply of energy, flaws in the gear train uneven discharge of the spring, uneven running of the gear train or the wheels actuating the hands and variations in temperature viscosity of lubricants are filtered by the remon- toir d’égalité.

Different from a force constante with its fixed division ratio, the remontoir d’égalité can be used independently of the movement’s frequency. For this reason, the Sauterelle’s movement has a frequency of 21 600 A/h resulting in higher precision.

The name “Sauterelle” – registered as a trademark by Andreas Strehler in 2008 – was chosen deliberately, as the jumping of the satellite gear reminds one of a grasshopper.

On the one hand, the calibre Sauterelle by Andreas Strehler in all consequence follows the classic principles for the construction of watches and the traditions of finishing movements. On the other hand, the design and the execution of the movement are innovative: From the best technical solution grows the delicate and almost organic look of the movement.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle rose gold watch

To apply classic construction principals means that a movement by Andreas Strehler could have been built a hundred years ago, albeit using different tools and technology. Exotic materials are missing completely from his movements. In all probability, his watches can still be repaired in a hundred years’ time by a skilled watchmaker.

Many technical inventions are aimed at the movement’s longevity: The winding mechanism employs true conical gear wheels, the specifically designed profile of whose teeth guarantee their functioning without wear, reducing abrasion to almost nil.

The characteristic organic look of the movements with their central main plate, relating in their elegance to Art Nouveau, has valid reasons: To find the technically soundest solution means more often than not to choose the direct way.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle watch in rose gold

Andreas Strehler achieves this through very few but very large wheels. It takes a lot of technical understanding to design the space needed for these wheels. The synthesis of tradition and modernity is also made evident by the finishing of the individual components. The hand-bevelling and polishing may be very traditional, yet it reaches acute angles no other watchmaker dares to touch.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle watch movement case back view

This craftsmanship is also reflected in the 10:1 scale model of the remontoir d’égalité: All of the technical details of the intermediary winding mechanism are executed with the same meticulous care, including the decoration and the bevelled edges, as on the wristwatch.

Andreas Strehler Sauterelle functional remontoir d'égalité

This functional model, entirely crafted by hand, invites the observer to discover the functioning of the Remontoir d’égalité with its switching operations, the movement of the stopping jewel, the re-tensioning of the hairspring and the rotation of the satellite wheel. The functional model is being manufactured upon request and is exclusively available to collectors of Andreas Strehler watches.

Technical details

Model: Andreas Strehler Sauterelle

  • Case: 18 carat rose gold
  • Calibre: Sauterelle, hand winding:156 parts, frequency: 3Hz/21’600A/h,32.0×30.0mm, height: 5.9mm,25 jewels, patented remontoir d’ ègalité, double main spring barrel, edges bevelled and polished by hand, fully decorated movement
  • Dial: Massive silver/sapphire
  • Hands: Blue steel or gold
  • Strap and buckle: Hand sewn alligator leather strap, buckle made from 18K red gold

Andreas Strehler receives the Prix Gaïa by Musée international d’horlogerie (MIH, International Watch Museum), La Chaux-de-Fonds

Independent watch maker Andreas Strehler has won the prestigious Gaïa Prize in the category Artisanat-Création.

This year’s Prix Gaïa was awarded for the 19th time on 19th September 2013. This most distinguished prize in watchmaking is awarded by Musée international d’horlogerie (MIH, International Watch Museum) in three categories:

  • ­ Artisanat-Création (craftsmanship-creation) for exceptional achievements in watchmaking

  • ­ Esprit d’entreprise (spirit of enterprise) for entrepreneurial achievements in the watch industry

  • ­ Histoire-Recherches (history-research) or services to the history of watchmaking

The jury consists of 13 personalities from the world of watches; its president is Ludwig Oechslin. This year the jury has awarded the prize in all three categories. The jury does not necessarily award the Prix Gaïa each year and in each category but only if an exceptional candidate is presented to the jury by one of its members.

Andreas Strehler received the Prix Gaïa in the category Artisanat-Création for his ingenious, minimalistic mechanical movements which are conceived like true living organisms.

Ernst Thomke was honoured for his outstanding role in the development of the SWATCH and the reorganisation of the Swiss watch industry after the quartz crisis.

The prize was further awarded to Dr. Günther Oestmann of the Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin), a researcher and scientist, for his publications on the history of German watchmaking.

Stephen Forsey held a most entertaining laudatory speech for Andreas Strehler. Stephen Forsey is himself a Prix Gaïa laureate (2009, with Robert Greubel for Esprit d’entreprise) and an old companion of Andreas Strehler. Both at one time worked together at Renaud &Papi in Le Locle, today’s Audemars Piguet Renaud & Papi SA.

The prize, a crystal ball representing the earth, was presented by Ludwig Oechslin, curator of the MIH, in the great assembly room of the MIH in the presence of Michel Ditisheim, grandson of Maurice Ditisheim who was one of the first sponsors of the MIH and who inspired the Prix Gaïa.

After the formal prize giving ceremony, a reception was held at the MIH and the laureates of 2013 were toasted and welcomed to the exclusive circle of the Prix Gaïa by Paul Gerber (laureate 2007), Beat Haldimann (laureate 2009), Elmar Mock and Jacques Mueller (laureates 2010), Antoine Simonin (laureate 1995) and many other personalities from the watch industry. The reception was followed by a celebratory dinner.

Past Prix Gaïa laureates are, among others, Günter Blümlein, Nicolas G. Hayek, François-Paul Journe, Michel Parmigiani, Vincent Calabrese and George Daniels.

List of Prix Gaïa laureates since 1993

  • 1993 – Jean-Claude Nicolet: Artisanat-creation/ Henry Louis Belmont: Histoire-recherches/ André Margot: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 1994 – François-Paul Journe: Artisanat-creation/ François Mercier: Histoire-recherches/ Anton Bally: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 1995 – Michel Parmigiani: Artisanat-creation/ Ludwig Oechslin: Histoire-recherches/ Antoine Simonin: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 1996 – Vincent Calabrese: Artisanat-creation/ Jean-Luc Mayaud: Histoire-recherches/ Günter Blümlein: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 1997 – Richard Daners: Artisanat-creation/ Jean-Claude Sabrier: Histoire-recherches/ Jean-Pierre Musy: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 1998 – Philippe Dufour: Artisanat-creation/ Yves Droz and Joseph Flores: Histoire-recherches/ Luigi Macaluso: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 1999 – Derek Pratt: Artisanat-creation/ Estelle Fallet: Histoire-recherches/ Gabriel Feuvrier: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 2000 – René Bannwart: Artisanat-creation/ Kathleen Pritschard: Histoire-recherches/ Simone Bédat: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 2001 – George Daniels: Artisanat-creation/ Catherine Cardinal: Histoire-recherches/ Rolf Schnyder: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 2003 – Antony G. Randall: Artisanat-creation
  • 2004 – André Beyner: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 2006 – Luigi Pippa: Artisanat-creation/ John H. Leopold: Histoire-recherches
  • 2007 – Paul Gerber: Artisanat-creation
  • 2008 – Nicolas G. Hayek: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 2009 – Beat Haldimann: Artisanat-creation/ Robert Greubel and Stephen Forsey: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 2010 – Jacques Mueller and Elmar Mock: Artisanat-creation/ Jean-Claude Biver: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 2011 – François Junod: Artisanat-creation/ Pierre-Yves Donzé: Histoire-recherches/ Philippe Stern: Esprit d’entreprise
    2012 – Eric Coudray: Artisanat-creation/ Francesco Garufo: Histoire-recherches/ Franco Cologni: Esprit d’entreprise
  • 2013 – Andreas Strehler: Artisanat-creation/ Günther Oestmann: Histoire-recherches/ Ernst Thomke: Esprit d’entreprise

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ANDREAS STREHLER COCON

Introduced in 2012 by Andreas Strehler, Cocon is a technical masterpiece from the award winning independent Swiss watch maker.

In 2008, Andreas Strehler presented his own interpretation of an emotional, sensual watch-movement – the Papillon. His aim was to create a living organism that would hold the observer spellbound.

To produce this fascination, Andreas Strehler developed a technical language of his own in the form of the Papillon. He drew his inspiration from the elegance of the technical progress of the late 19th century, like the floral elements of the Art Nouveau.

ANDREAS STREHLER COCON
ANDREAS STREHLER COCON

Inspired by the art of traditional Swiss watch making, Andreas Strehler created his own methods to make the construction of his watch movements unique. First he broke with the classical link between the main plate and the bridge, the dial and the movement side, since this would have had a restricting effect on his ideas.

For Andreas Strehler, the most important aspect of his Cocon was the clarity of the dial, without neglecting a special elegance which is basic to all of his watches. His idea was to have a visible gear train allowing one to look deeply into the movement and see it working.

The supporting elements were to be kept to a minimum, but they should have an aesthetic form to captivate the observer. Andreas Strehler needed no more than three wheels to create his idea of a living watch-organism. The time is almost hidden above the two barrels, mystérieuse on two toothed glass discs, without the driving mechanism being visible.

Andreas Strehler‘s Cocon is a further development of the Papillon. Whereas the living technology was the main feature of the Papillon, Andreas Strehler now puts the emphasis on the readability of the time. Time, and its division, was to be emphasized, without diverting from his basic technological principles.

Andreas Strehler Papillon
Andreas Strehler Papillon

The gear train, previously so dominant, is now hidden beneath the dial, invisible to the wearer. The delicate butterfly shaped cage, formerly the visible hallmark of the movement, is now at the back of the watch, well protected, but still visible under glass. The butterfly, or Papillon in French, thus withdraws into the background, in its cocoon, hidden under the dial.

ANDREAS STREHLER COCON

Strehler opted against the classical layout of the dial displaying hours and minutes with a separate small seconds dial. Instead the breathing of the spirals is visible through the dial. This enables the beholder to immerse himself into the dial, his eye, caught by the seconds-hand, experiences the different steps of time as they are displayed at differing levels. The positioning of the small-seconds at 10 is a remarkable feat.

The Papillon was constructed with the aim of producing a harmonious movement with original ideas which can show the time, but need not do so necessarily. The most important aspect was to be the harmony of the mechanics, the elegance and aesthetic of form and the interaction of the wheels which beat the time. And although the movement is composed of metal, it should appear as something from nature.

ANDREAS STREHLER COCON

To achieve this, Andreas Strehler chose a totally new configuration for the construction of the movement, abandoning the traditional difference between the face and the back of the watch.

By this apparent break with tradition, Andreas Strehler introduced new ideas without dispensing with the traditional craftsmen‘s methods of decoration which underline optically the quality of his work. The bevelling in the internal edges was carried to the limit in the Papillon.

The movement is constructed in a different way to that of any other watch. Whilst Andreas Strehler is careful to construct his movement along classic lines, it must not be similar to movements of the past. At a second glance, this movement appears as his own and modern interpretation of the traditional watchmakers‘ craft.

For example, he manages without the classical main plate of a central plate with its various cut-outs. It was important for him to create an aesthetic movement.

The elegance of the central plate is enhanced by Côtes de Genève and appears as a mainspring bridge, rather than the central element. And in order to stress the optical impression of an organically formed movement, Andreas Strehler opted for a central bridge in the shape of a butterfly.

The construction of the movement, its shape, follows the technical necessities. In this way the position of the two barrels and the balance wheel form a basic slanted oval shape which corresponds with the shape of the watch-case.

The Papillon movement is a technical masterpiece. Its mechanics are reduced to the absolute minimum. For the Papillon, Andreas Strehler uses only three wheels for the transmission of power – the central wheel, intermediate wheel and escapement wheel.

The shape of the central wheel and the intermediate wheel dominates the appearance of the Papillon. And this impression is increased by the smooth rounding of the bevelled wheels.

Although the Papillon movement appears very simple, it manifests a number of nice details which will please the hearts of everyone interested in mechanics. The two barrels provide the Papillon with a guaranteed power reserve of 80 hours, although the energy stored in both barrels would enable a much longer power reserve.

They are connected in parallel and thus guarantee smooth winding and the even action of the two mainsprings. Besides the generous power reserve, the use of two barrels brings further advantages, for example the almost total elimination of bearing pressure on the central wheel – thus enabling optimal timekeeping precision.

A further special detail is the use of genuine conical gear wheels for the winding wheel and the winding pinion. As a result, these show no wear in the transmission of power and are therefore extremely long-lasting. In addition, their special gear tooth system enables the watch to be wound up smoothly and lightly.

ANDREAS STREHLER COCON

The movement of the Cocon is Andreas Strehler‘s further interpretation of a movement as a living organism.

But this time he places the emphasis on the clarity of the dial, whilst the mechanics are hidden beneath it and may only be viewed under the glass back of the watchcase. The hour and minute hands are complemented by a small seconds hand. But the movement of the Cocon was not to be any thicker than that of the Papillon despite this conventional dial.

Andreas Strehler ruled out a simple modification of the Papillon movement. That would have entailed too many modifications. Especially as the small seconds was to be in the direct flow of power. He did not intend the Cocon movement to be a simplified version of an existing movement. It was to be a unique, novel interpretation reduced to a technical minimum.

Once again Andreas Strehler diverted from the classical movement construction and chose instead a central plate on which he positioned the gear train with its additional seconds-wheel without altering the position of the barrels or the balance-wheel.

Although a completely new construction, the general shape of the movement was maintained. The cogged-wheels, now smaller, are still the same shape as in the Papillon. And the butterfly, as the shape of the bridge, is also to be found in the Cocon.

Here, however, it is faced towards the wearer of the watch and hidden from the public eye. It was the small seconds dial that made the decisive modifications necessary. And they demanded of Andreas Strehler an even greater degree of precision. It‘s true that the Papillon was renowned for excellent time-keeping. But Strehler‘s aim was to do even better with the Cocon with its clear dial and the seconds-hand, which is an invitation to check on the watch‘s precision.

In order to achieve this, the oscillation frequency of the balance was increased from 18 000 (2.5Hz) to 21 600 (3 Hz). This increase in the oscillation frequency brought about the greater reliability and time-keeping precision that the small seconds-hand deserved.

With its two barrels, the Cocon has a theoretical power reserve of between 90 and 100 hours. But because Andreas Strehler attaches great importance to time-keeping precision, the movement has energy for only 78 hours at its disposal.

A further unwinding of the mainsprings is prevented by means of an epicyclic gear set. This limitation enables Andreas Strehler to achieve an almost linear deployment of energy plus an optimal power flow and constant precision for the whole time that the watch is running, made possible by avoiding a strong reduction in torque as the mainsprings gradually unwind.

The use of an epicyclic gear set to limit the working of the mainsprings also reduces friction. And the parallel connected barrels are a further advantage. They guarantee a constant winding and unwinding of the mainsprings.

Aside from these modifications, Andreas Strehler retained the conically cogged conical gear wheel in the winding gear set because of the advantages they bring with them. This basic form was to be integrated into the watchcase and reflected in the materials used.

The form of the movement follows the technical necessities. The desired technology – two barrels, a relatively large balance-wheel – led to an optimal alignment with the slanting oval shape of the movement. Just as the proportions of the movement are determined by the technology, so is the shape of the watchcase determined by the movement.

Andreas Strehler‘s movement is an integrated product, specially developed and constructed for the watch. It is therefore instrumental in determining the shape of the watch. Andreas Strehler made the form of the movement an element for the configuration for the watchcase.

In this way the movement and the watchcase combine to form not only a unity of design, but a unity of technology as well. This thought goes on to the crown which is reminiscent of a flower and thus reflects the living interior of the watch.

As a result of this attentive dedication to form, the wearer is able to develop a personal relationship with his wristwatch. And in order to guarantee the restoration of the case of the Papillon or the Cocon to a condition as good as new, even after decades, Andreas Strehler paid special attention to the factor of durability during its construction.

That is why the case is a complex construction with no fewer than 12 elements. And the modular construction makes it possible for customers to choose their individual material combinations and so create their own, personal wristwatch.

The Coco has a slightly modified case with shorter lugs and even more harmonious proportions. In order to emphasize the organic form of movement and watchcase, Andreas Strehler opted for red-gold because of its particularly warm colour.

Technical details

Model: ANDREAS STREHLER COCON

Case, dial and strap
Case: Red gold (5N) or steel, 41 mm
Dial: Silver
Dial ring: Sapphire glass
Hour/Minute Hands: Steel blue or gold
Sec-Hand: Steel blue
Strap: Salmon leather gray
Water resistance: 3 ATM

Movement
Type: Mechanical (manual winding)
Power reserve: 78 hours
Double mainspring
Satellite gear stopworks
Conical winding gears
Shape and dimensions: Tonneau shape (l: 32.0 / w: 30.0 / t: 5.9 mm)
Frequency: 3Hz / 21`600 A/h
Jewels: 20

Andreas Strehler Papillon

In 2007, Switzerland based master watchmaker Andreas Strehler presented an emotional, sensual mechanical watch movement – the Papillon.

His aim was to create a living organism that would hold the observer spellbound. In contrast to many firms, Andreas Strehler regards his movements not as cold, technical machines but as living organisms whose elegance invite one to sense the time and the mechanics that generate it.

He deals with the aesthetics of time without the necessary domination of ease of reading the dial. Sometimes he even runs counter to it. For example, it is possible to regard the cosmos of a Papillon as a mere mechanical marvel, the only function of which is to fascinate the beholder by the sight of the functioning movement.

Andreas Strehler Papillon

To produce this fascination, Andreas Strehler developed a technical language of his own in the form of the Papillon. He drew his inspiration from the elegance of the technical progress of the late 19th century. In particular, it is the floral elements of the Art Nouveau, which perform basic functions in spite of their fragility that are to be found in the construction of the Papillon.

Inspired by the art of traditional Swiss watch making, Andreas Strehler created his very own formal expression which makes the construction of his watch movements unique. First he broke with the classical link between the main plate and the bridge, the dial and the movement side, since this would have had a restricting effect on his ideas.

Andreas Strehler Papillon

His idea was to have a visible gear train allowing one to look deeply into the movement and see it working. The supporting elements were to be kept to a minimum, but they should have an aesthetic form to captivate the observer.

Andreas Strehler needed no more than three wheels to create his idea of a living watch-organism. The time is almost hidden above the two barrels, ‚mystérieuse‘ on two toothed glass discs, without the driving mechanism being visible.

Andreas Strehler Papillon

The Papillon was constructed with the aim of producing a harmonious movement with original ideas which can show the time, but need not do so necessarily. The most important aspect was to be the harmony of the mechanics, the elegance and aesthetic of form and the interaction of the wheels which beat the time. And although the movement is composed of metal, it should appear as something from nature.

To achieve this, Andreas Strehler chose a totally new configuration for the construction of the movement, abandoning the traditional difference between the face and the back of the watch. By this apparent break with tradition, Andreas Strehler introduced new ideas without dispensing with the traditional craftsmen‘s methods of decoration which underline optically the quality of his work.

The bevelling in the internal edges was carried to the limit in the Papillon. Hardly any other watchmaker had dared to bevell such sharp edges by hand.

Andreas Strehler Papillon watch movement

The movement is constructed in a different way to that of any other watch. Whilst Andreas Strehler is careful to construct his movement along classic lines, it must not be similar to movements of the past. That may sound like a contradiction in terms. But at a second glance, his movement appears as his own individual, modern interpretation of the traditional watchmakers‘ craft.

For example, he manages without the classical main plate of a central plate with its various cut-outs. It was important for him to create an aesthetic movement. The elegance of the central plate is enhanced by Côtes de Genève and appears as a mainspring bridge, rather than the central element. And in order to stress the optical impression of an organically formed movement, Andreas Strehler opted for a central bridge in the shape of a butterfly.

Andreas Strehler Papillon

The construction of the movement, its shape, follows the technical necessities. In this way the position of the two barrels and the balance wheel form a basic slanted oval shape which corresponds with the shape of the watch-case. The Papillon movement is a technical masterpiece. Its mechanics are reduced to the absolute minimum.

For the Papillon, Andreas Strehler uses only three wheels for the transmission of power – the central wheel, intermediate wheel and escapement wheel. The shape of the central wheel and the intermediate wheel dominates the appearance of the Papillon. And this impression is increased by the smooth roundings of the bevelled wheels.

Although the Papillon movement appears very simple, it manifests a number of nice details which will please the hearts of everyone interested in mechanics. The two barrels provide the Papillon with a guaranteed power reserve of 80 hours, although the energy stored in both barrels would enable a much longer power reserve. They are connected in parallel and thus guarantee smooth winding and the even action of the two mainsprings.

Besides the generous power reserve, the use of two barrels brings further advantages, for example the almost total elimination of bearing pressure on the central wheel – thus enabling optimal timekeeping precision.

A further special detail is the use of genuine conical gear wheels for the winding wheel and the winding pinion. As a result, these show no wear in the transmission of power and are therefore extremely long-lasting. In addition, their special gear tooth system enables the watch to be wound up smoothly and lightly.

Technical details

Papillon Classic

  • Case: Palladium white gold 88g
  • Dimension: Width 41 mm, overall length 47.20 mm, height 10 mm
  • Dial: 2 toothed sapphire wheels, for hours and minutes
  • Strap: Black alligator with tang buckle in white gold
  • Movement: Mechanical, manual winding; mysterious hours and minutes displayed by the gears themselves; Power reserve: 78 hours, double mainspring; Size: tonneau shape: 32.00 x 30.00 mm, thickness 6.9 mm; Frequency: 2.5Hz / 18,000 A/h; Jewels: 19